Functions

This is a discussion on Functions within the C++ Programming forums, part of the General Programming Boards category; Okay I really hate making multiple threads, but I was wondering how to create functions. Like my own functions that ...

  1. #1
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    Functions

    Okay I really hate making multiple threads, but I was wondering how to create functions. Like my own functions that are like

    fry()
    beat()
    distort()


    You get the idea. Just examples of verbs that I don't think are real standard functions.

  2. #2
    Sweet
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    Function:
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    
    void fry(std::string &food)
    {
         std::cout<<"You fried "<<food;
    }
    
    int main()
    {
        std::string chicken = "Chicken";
        fry(chicken);
        return 0;
    }
    Woop?

  3. #3
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    What does this mean? (std::string &food)

    And that void fry() at the beginning... were you declaring the function perhaps?
    I guess I just don't understand the whole "std::string" thing. Sorry I'm a noob (as if you couldn't tell already .

  4. #4
    Sweet
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    std::string is the string class provided by C++. I was defining the function if I wanted to prototype it I would have wrote just void fry(std::string &food) and defined it after main(). As for what std::string &food does it is passing the string object itself not a copy so it is "faster" if you wanted you could just write it as void fry(std::string food) and for this function it would produce the same results.
    Woop?

  5. #5
    Registered User mrafcho001's Avatar
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    also you can replace the return type (void for the example above) at the begining to something else
    Code:
    int add(int int1, int int2)  //the int can be replayed with any type
    {
    return int1 + int2;
    }
    
    int main()
    {
       cout << add(2,2) << endl;  //this will display 4
       int integer = add(1, 3);  //integer is now 4
    
    return 0;
    }
    My Website
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  6. #6
    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    Also you can include <iostream>.
    dwk

    Seek and ye shall find. quaere et invenies.

    "Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it." -- Alan Perlis
    "Testing can only prove the presence of bugs, not their absence." -- Edsger Dijkstra
    "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing." -- John Powell


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  7. #7
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    Here is a common way to use functions..

    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    #include <string>
    
    int mult(int x, int y)
    {
    return x * y;
    }
    I'm a beginner C++ programmer, but I have studied HTML and Java. So if you need to help me I should catch on fast =)

  8. #8
    *this
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    Code:
    void fry () 
    {
       //put code here
    }
    
    void beat ()
    {
       //put code here
    }
    
    void distort ()
    {
       //put code here
    }
    
    // Here is where your programs "heart" is... When you run the 
    // .exe it starts with the first line from main as you probably know...
    // so we can call your functions right here
    int main ()
    {
       fry ();
       beat ();
       distort ();
    
       return 0;
    }
    The void means it has no return type.
    A return type is when a function can return a value like lets say your function does 5 + 5 and returns 10 because its the sum. Then you can have a variable like...

    "int sum = function(); "
    function returns an integer that is assigned to sum.

    This will give you a good explanation:
    http://www.mvhs.fuhsd.org/bob_vanhoy/pdfs/lesson06.pdf
    http://www.mvhs.fuhsd.org/bob_vanhoy/pdfs/lesson07.pdf
    Last edited by JoshR; 07-22-2005 at 03:37 PM.

  9. #9
    Frequently Quite Prolix dwks's Avatar
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    You can call your functions multiple times, too.
    dwk

    Seek and ye shall find. quaere et invenies.

    "Simplicity does not precede complexity, but follows it." -- Alan Perlis
    "Testing can only prove the presence of bugs, not their absence." -- Edsger Dijkstra
    "The only real mistake is the one from which we learn nothing." -- John Powell


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    Unofficial Wiki FAQ: cpwiki.sf.net

    My website: http://dwks.theprogrammingsite.com/
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