Thread: Debian Stable, with Unstable Repo

  1. #1
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Debian Stable, with Unstable Repo

    At the office we are in the process of migrating to Linux. Most of our development has migrated towards Linux. The few remaining windows projects are going to be maintained through virtualization.

    I'm considering the Debian stable distribution. But I need some bleeding-edge applications (postgre, python 3.4.x, libraries) and a few more recent versions of other software, since the stable distribution of Debian is too conservative (MATE, nvidia drivers, and Git come to mind).

    For this effect I'm thinking installing the stable distro and then enabling/disabling the unstable repo (main, contrib and non-free) when installing or upgrading that software I need to stay more up-to-date. Writing some scripts to automate this process might be a good idea.

    Is this a common Debian setup? Is there anything I should be aware of?
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    Is this a common Debian setup? Is there anything I should be aware of?
    O_o

    You should just throw "partial rolling release Debian" at your favorite search engine.

    You'll find all the information you need, scripts for multiple managers, and even packaged releases configured to do what you are talking about.

    So yeah, the setup is very common.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

  3. #3
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    You should just throw "partial rolling release Debian" at your favorite search engine.
    That eventually got me here. Thanks.

    Debian is pretty new to me. I need to study further the consequences of choosing stable+unstable over testing+unstable as was suggested over there. Also, what may have changed about that post since 2007. But this pretty much puts me in the right track.

    In any case I'll be digging up some more. You are right. After all, what I'm after is a "partial rolling release". The idea of using something like Chakra or PCLinusOS is also a possibility...
    Last edited by Mario F.; 09-18-2015 at 10:24 PM.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
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    Debian is a good choice for this, but if you're willing to put more work in on your setup script, take a look at Arch for consideration. It's very bleeding edge, and in spite of being a rolling release, is amazingly stable (in my anecdotal experince it's proven to be more stable than Ubuntu and Fedora, "stable").

    An, the proprietary nVidia driver is provided through a vanilla package, as opposed to Debian and Red Hat based systems that need to compile a DKMS module for each install or update.

    Congrats on the migration.

  5. #5
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    The idea of using something like Chakra or PCLinusOS is also a possibility...
    O_o

    I have nothing against independent distributions, but you seem to be making a business decision so I'd strongly suggest learning to get what you need from "Debian" or "Arch" depending on which side of the edge you want to land. At the very least, find your list of candidate software and make sure the independent distribution community supports all the relevant packages. You really don't want to be stuck maintaining too many packages just to get the updates to software you need.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

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    I am trying Linux once more and I wonder what you think of my solution of the problem.

    I am just enabling the source repo for the unstable repos and compiling my own deb packages; not sure if its a method that would work for the OP or not.
    I am currently only using a small number of unstable packages; so, not much work.
    On the plus side, I have used this method with Ubuntu packages and it seems to work OK under Debian stable.

    Tim S.
    "...a computer is a stupid machine with the ability to do incredibly smart things, while computer programmers are smart people with the ability to do incredibly stupid things. They are,in short, a perfect match.." Bill Bryson

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Yarin View Post
    Debian is a good choice for this, but if you're willing to put more work in on your setup script, take a look at Arch for consideration.
    I've been running Arch at home for the past 2 or 3 years. It's no doubt my favorite distro and perfect for rolling releases. But it's not suitable here since I need something more easy to setup and maintain. Arch is demanding on the administration side of things. Particularly during the initial setup. I'm considering Arch for the server back at the office though. But for the developer machines and the CD we will eventually prepare for our customers, it must be something else.

    We are all more or less comfortable around Linux. But our *collective* experience still only amounts to a decade or so. We will very likely run into trouble trying to adapt Arch.

    Quote Originally Posted by Yarin View Post
    Congrats on the migration.
    We've been planning on this since late last year. It was long overdo. I'm glad we finally are in a position to remove ourselves entirely from Windows. And couldn't have come at a better time too, considering what's been coming to light concerning Windows 7 and 10.

    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    I have nothing against independent distributions, but you seem to be making a business decision so I'd strongly suggest learning to get what you need from "Debian" or "Arch" depending on which side of the edge you want to land.
    Indeed. I was just thinking out loud. I'm still planning, looking at things and trying to come up with something I don't regret. The actual migration will only happen early November and on this I'm not taking the decision alone. I'm involving everyone.

    Quote Originally Posted by stahta01 View Post
    I am just enabling the source repo for the unstable repos and compiling my own deb packages; not sure if its a method that would work for the OP or not.
    Actually it would. It's a splendid idea in fact, since we really only tend to need a relatively small subset of up-to-date deb packages. There's a bit more work involved, but it is perfect solution at least for the version we intend to distribute to our customers. And since there is always someone involved in the process of building from the sources, it is easier to catch any conflicting libraries and whatnot. Hmm...
    Last edited by Mario F.; 09-19-2015 at 06:52 AM.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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