Thread: hello, cboard members

  1. #1
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    hello, cboard members

    Hi everyone, I just became a member of this forum. Its my goal to become a security researcher. At the moment I lack the required skill sets. Hence becoming a member.

    I do plan to learn from the vast amount of knowledge that is provided by this website and its devoted members.

    I am currently learning Unix and at the same time C. My search for a practical C Code base lead me to this awesome website.

    I hope my stay is welcomed and i hope i do enjoy the learning process.

  2. #2
    Informer -Adrian's Avatar
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    Welcome! There are some really experienced users here that I'm sure can help you with C and systems programming.

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Welcome! Do note that we actually have a rule that might be relevant to security research with respect to C:
    6. Messages relating to cracking, (erroneously called "hacking" by many), copyright violations, or other illegal activities will be deleted. Due to the overlapping boundaries of code with malicious intent, and other legitimate uses of it, the moderators will assess each potential infraction on a case by case basis.
    I'd say that research is certainly legitimate, but such discussion may call for prudential judgement in a public forum like this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjarne Stroustrup (2000-10-14)
    I get maybe two dozen requests for help with some sort of programming or design problem every day. Most have more sense than to send me hundreds of lines of code. If they do, I ask them to find the smallest example that exhibits the problem and send me that. Mostly, they then find the error themselves. "Finding the smallest program that demonstrates the error" is a powerful debugging tool.
    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

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    Welcome to cboard! While the learning process is a very personal journey, you can really gain a lot of knowledge by hanging around here.

    Best of luck with your studies!

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    Hi Matticus, I like the way you put it that
    the learning process is a very personal Journey
    . Can you please elaborate if you do not mind.

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    Quote Originally Posted by splitfunc0 View Post
    Can you please elaborate if you do not mind.
    You can learn a lot from books, and from other people. But most of your programming skills will be developed from repetitive practice you do yourself.

    And after you master the basics, there are many different directions you can go. What you choose to learn next, and actually learning it, is a largely self-guided exercise.

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    What you choose to learn next, and actually learning it, is a largely self-guided exercise.
    Well I have always had strong interest in Learning C and Unix. What i find difficult is the length of time it will take me to pick up the basics and move on to other interesting things.
    Like you rightly said it is a self guided exercise, this is where i am having problems. I do not have the staying power and motivation to start reading a Book and actually finish reading the book. why this happens i do not know. But since i started reading Beginning C things have been going pretty well for me and i am hoping to read it through till the end. Is this common among other programmers.

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    I currently have five programming/computer books I've started and then fizzled out on. It happens.

    It's not uncommon for people to drift away from a skill they're trying to learn, and there are many reasons for this: responsibilities, life situations, shifting interests, lack of self-discipline, and so on. If you find this happening to you, do not despair - just get back into it and keep on going. Taking extended breaks is not always a bad thing.

    It's also important to truly enjoy the subject you're trying to learn. Rather than feeling like you must practice, you instead do it out of sheer enjoyment.

    Set clear short-term goals for yourself so you have something to aim for. The excitement of reaching a goal, and the pride of seeing something you made working, can inspire you to keep going to the next level.

    Try to limit time-wasting activities. Time spent watching the television, or dawdling on social media, can be better spent learning. Don't push yourself too hard though, or it will become more of a chore and harder to continue. As long as you spend a decent amount of time studying, unwinding with a mindless activity can be refreshing.

    Spending time in communities such as this can also be very motivating.

    Keep at it and be sure to have fun.

  9. #9
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    Hi Matticus, thank you so much for this piece of advice. I find it very informative. You touched on areas that i have experienced difficulties in the past. Thanks for this post.

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