Thread: Backdoor All The Things!

  1. #1
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    Backdoor All The Things!

    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

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    Programming Wraith GReaper's Avatar
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    This is the only response that order deserves and that it'll get:
    Quote Originally Posted by Rapnel
    Sorry, haven't quite read the piece yet, but....

    Ahhhh-hah-hah-hah-hah-hah-haaah-ha-heh-hoo-hoo-hehh. gasp.

    omfg, it hurts a little..
    Devoted my life to programming...

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    Make Fortran great again
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    Yeah, didn't like that either.

    Been watching a lot of documentaries lately, I was under the false impression that Russia had been pretty much chill since the break-up of the USSR, but then part of Ukraine gets annexed 2 years ago, and seeing his policies and whatnot in these docs...not all that "good" of a country because of him.

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Wonder if we'll see services leaving Russia en-masse? They're shooting themselves in the leg here. The reactions should be interesting to see...
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    The new “anti-terrorist” laws require all “organizers of information distribution” that add “additional coding” to transmitted electronic messages to provide the FSB with any information necessary to decrypt those messages.
    That to me spells like, criminals will love this. And non-criminals will have in here a real incentive to become one.
    The icing on the cake of a society that has just lost all hope to privacy or security is a rise in criminality.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Make Fortran great again
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    Those politicians sure like the back door...
    What can this strange device be?
    When I touch it, it gives forth a sound
    It's got wires that vibrate and give music
    What can this thing be that I found?

  8. #8
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    More of a sad: UK gov says new Home Sec will have powers to ban end-to-end encryption • The Register

    I'm beginning to think I've managed to overestimate the intelligence of politicians.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Indeed. The terrorists are the smart ones here; they really are making the life in the West miserable. Congratulations!

    But this is one of the fallouts of the brexit. This is one of the laws that was not possible to pass if UK had remained a member of the EU. Enjoy your independence.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  10. #10
    Registered User taazz's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Mario F. View Post
    Indeed. The terrorists are the smart ones here; they really are making the life in the West miserable. Congratulations!

    But this is one of the fallouts of the brexit. This is one of the laws that was not possible to pass if UK had remained a member of the EU. Enjoy your independence.
    that is false. EU has nothing to do with Russian legislation.

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    Lurking whiteflags's Avatar
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    I wonder how they're going to manage this in any meaningful way. To me it's kinda like trying to get toothpaste back in its tube. Strong encryption exists and it's not like it can go away. We know how to do it and its backbone is one-way mathematics. Encryption algorithms get old, not its principles.

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    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    I wonder how they're going to manage this in any meaningful way.
    O_o

    The easiest way is brute force.

    I don't mean algorithms... I mean the political equivalent of a pipe to the knees.

    To me it's kinda like trying to get toothpaste back in its tube.
    Retubing toothpaste would be extraordinarily simple by comparison.

    The toothpaste would not fight back with subterfuge and disobedience.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap
    The toothpaste would not fight back with subterfuge and disobedience.
    Having tried to get toothpaste back into the tube, I beg to differ.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjarne Stroustrup (2000-10-14)
    I get maybe two dozen requests for help with some sort of programming or design problem every day. Most have more sense than to send me hundreds of lines of code. If they do, I ask them to find the smallest example that exhibits the problem and send me that. Mostly, they then find the error themselves. "Finding the smallest program that demonstrates the error" is a powerful debugging tool.
    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

  14. #14
    and the hat of int overfl Salem's Avatar
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    Good ole uncle sam getting in on the act as well.
    FBI says its malware isn't malware because 'we're the good guys' | ZDNet
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.

  15. #15
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by whiteflags View Post
    I wonder how they're going to manage this in any meaningful way. To me it's kinda like trying to get toothpaste back in its tube. Strong encryption exists and it's not like it can go away. We know how to do it and its backbone is one-way mathematics. Encryption algorithms get old, not its principles.
    That's been on my mind too. But I think the play here is different.
    A ban on encryption is not the objective. What governments are wanting to do is to ensure a select and representative group of top service providers and manufacturers to become accessible to them, providing them a measure of control. Those others living on the fringes, offering strong point-to-point encryption, will always get some manner of pressure but will not become primary targets of backdoor enforcement until they grow to the size of a business that needs to provide the government that control.

    Whether they will succeed is something that troubles me. I think in the end they will, because societies tend to numb down their reaction and lose the ability to complain and demand as a block, when changes are made progressively and in such a way that each steps doesn't disturb to much. That's how you eventually move from a free state to a police state with the blessing of your people.

    Another aspect that troubles me greatly is how much of this can be done behind closed doors in private and secret agreements, without the knowledge of consumers. The technology itself and the way it must be managed,makes it very hard for a large company to hide it is collaborating with secret services or providing encryption keys. But the very nature of that participation, means there's very few people involved and there's numerous ways a company can PR their way out of it, making whistleblowing difficult and ineffective, while always providing companies a measure of reasonable doubt. This reasonable doubt is the only weapon they need, considering how consumers seem to be addicted to technological products and services, forming even strong opinions and preferences among them.

    It's likely to me that governments will not stop in this quest of theirs. And we will be progressively be pushed down that road. Eventually a marginal culture will emerge with solutions that will allow individuals to move underground. And the public, controlled and supervised internet will share its space with the underground internet.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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