Thread: Lol @ Microsoft

  1. #1
    Make Fortran great again
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    Lol @ Microsoft

    Reviewing Microsoft's Automatic Insertion of Telemetry into C++ Binaries

    Seriously, with all the crap I've been hearing about Windows 10 (forced installs, tons of data sent back to MS by default, etc), never been a better reason to ditch Windows completely. MS is lucky that there are important business applications that are Windows only to keep its worthless ass alive.

  2. #2
    and the hat of copycat stevesmithx's Avatar
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    M$ seems to be desperate for a technological breakthrough, that they seem to do all sorts of nonsense, off late. Their phone business is dead thanks to their crappy design of their phone OS (They took down one good company with them that would have had a chance if they had opted for Android). Win 8/8.1 didn't go well with the public.

    Running any antivirus tool in Win10 would be a joke because that OS *IS* spyware. Now all they have is the Office suite and non-technical users, to survive. Balmer must have seen it all coming while throwing his CEO chair to his successor. Don't know why old Bill is not doing anything about the very widespread criticism.

  3. #3
    Unregistered User Yarin's Avatar
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    The ensuing controversy and conversation about the discovery of this function led to a response from Microsoft’s Steve Carroll, Development Manager for the Visual C++ team. First and foremost in his response is the unequivocal statement that this functionality will be removed in Visual Studio 2015’s Update 3.
    Where "remove" means "do a better job at hiding", I'm sure

  4. #4
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epy View Post
    MS is lucky that there are important business applications that are Windows only to keep its worthless ass alive.
    If they keep it up with the current trend, not for long. It is just an universal inevitability that any action calls for a reaction. And so many actions can only sustain a trend for so long until something changes.

    Look at what it did to me and my company... 5 years ago, if you had claimed that in 3 years I would be using Linux exclusively at home and had changed my business entirely to be based on the linux ecosystem, I would call you nuts, lunatic, a raving mad troll. And while some may be too quick to call my experience simply anecdotal, I would advise against it. In Asia, in particular, Linux adoption rates by corporations have been steadily increasing over the past decade. And my own experience here in a 3rd world country shows the clear advantages of staying away from Microsoft increased costs in infrastructure, constant training, and bandwidth footprint (remember, one 1Gb upload or download in Africa can cost you as much as 7 USD).

    Meanwhile I've been getting feedback on many companies who simply don't want, plan, or predict, they will upgrade to Windows 10 in this decade, or next. Microsoft, once again fractured its market and is poised to turn Windows 7 into the next XP. At least for corporations, government and public systems (like ATMs and whatnot). All these attempts at forcing Windows 10 down people's throats are exactly their way of trying to counter what they knew they were starting with Windows 10.

    This telemetry disease that caught hold of Microsoft, this immense desire of the company to create a data backbone that can eventually get it into Google's market, this forceful push towards a core technology that will move the Microsoft software ecosystem into a walled online market, all of this is being done at the expense of their operating system. They obviously trust that the market, with the help of advocates and apologists the likes of Peter Bright on Ars, will adapt and slowly cede its natural tendency to resist these type of invasive changes. They are right in a way because the years have shown us that conformism is the real weakness of consumer rights. But other changes are taking place that may affect Microsoft in ways that it couldn't expect. Projects like Vulkan, for instance, have the power to take a large nab of the current DirectX market, with the potential to remove from Microsoft a large group of the one community that has remain loyal to it (out of lack of other choices); PC gamers.
    Last edited by Mario F.; 06-10-2016 at 12:20 PM.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  5. #5
    Make Fortran great again
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    I was kind of hoping for that reaction 10 years ago, but here we are still. Hope you are right though. Things like AutoCAD, SolidWorks, RSLogix keep our work using Windows unfortunately. The applications are so big and complex that I don't even want to try wine with them.

  6. #6
    Make Fortran great again
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    Was just thinking, really should be a law that says that file format specifications have to be open and made available, perhaps after a period of time if not immediately. Pretty much the only thing that keeps these applications living. AutoCAD became the de-facto standard for 2D CAD work in the 90s-ish, and the software gets crappier with every release, REALLY crappy since 2009. 20 years later, still the case. Only reason we don't have decent open-source options is because of the complicated file format.

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    Lurking whiteflags's Avatar
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    Well, I don't think we're headed in that direction in general. It's only getting more complex with the advent of 3D printers and whether the files those printers use to produce objects can be copyrighted.

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    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epy View Post
    I was kind of hoping for that reaction 10 years ago, but here we are still. Hope you are right though. Things like AutoCAD, SolidWorks, RSLogix keep our work using Windows unfortunately. The applications are so big and complex that I don't even want to try wine with them.
    There will always be a market for Windows. Not just those corner cases, but even in the mainstream PC market. Microsoft is however taking a path that has the potential to lead to a loss of market that may dramatically change the current PC OS pie chart.

    And that is a good thing. Because the Microsoft operating system does not offer anything special that forces specialized software into it. It's its history and its culture that has kept companies from developing similar and equally powerful software on other operating systems. Naturally, a loss of market by Microsoft can change all of that. Linux software already operates nuclear power plants, submarines, nuclear weapons, CERN, FAA traffic control, the NYSE. It's just the commercial market that is still historically dependent on Windows. Not technically dependent, but simply culturally and economically.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  9. #9
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    Wow.

    I wonder if Microsoft will next change the dynamic linker to report every time a module loads.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

  10. #10
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    The amazement never stops. If there was an alternative to Windows, I'd change to it in a heartbeat.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  11. #11
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    The amazement never stops. If there was an alternative to Windows, I'd change to it in a heartbeat.
    Lol...

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    Its hard... But im here swgh's Avatar
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    > The amazement never stops. If there was an alternative to Windows, I'd change to it in a heartbeat

    You should look into OSX and use Xcode. We (work company) used it last year to build part of
    a tool set for an application in C. Loved the speed and stability of the application. Yes I know
    Macs are still over-priced but they are so worth the additional cost.
    Double Helix STL

  13. #13
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    I will never put my hands on an Apple product. Ever.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  14. #14
    Tweaking master Aslaville's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    I will never put my hands on an Apple product. Ever.
    You sound *sooooooo* determined. Would you mind explaining why ?

  15. #15
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    * Becuase I don't like their UI
    * Because I don't like how overpriced their products are
    * Because I don't like how they physically design their products
    * Because I think it's a disgusting company (the way they treat their employees, or have treated them in the past)
    * Because they're lagging behind in innovation (well, at least on the mobile side)
    * And more I probably can't recall at the moment

    * Becuase I vehemtely disagree with their business practices (locked down ecosystem, controlled app store, etc). Anything that takes away our freedom of expression is evil. For example, there's just no way to get nudity onto their mobile platform. Nudity is a form of an expression, but because they say so, it's not allowed. It isn't illegal, so what gives them the right to dictate what we can and can't do in this regard? Or maybe I just made a messenger program, and Apple has their own. Now I'm actually competing with their built-in messenger, so I'm suddenly not allowed to publish said app because Apple thinks it might compete with them (yeah, they use this excuse all the time).
    Last edited by Elysia; 06-20-2016 at 08:30 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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