Thread: Your latest projects

  1. #16
    Registered User MutantJohn's Avatar
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    I actually went to that iMechanica site and got in contact with a professor there looking for PhD candidates. Unfortunately, my GPA was waaaaaaaaaay too low to ever be let into their school, especially as a PhD candidate without a Master's.

    But I did learn what's marketable in the work that I want to do and it's physics, GPGPU computing and, ironically enough, web development.

    This actually inspired me to pick up CUDA again and now that I've had time and about 8 months of professional experience in something I knew relatively little about, I find myself having a much easier time. Hopefully, I'll be able to actually be the first person to write a "degenerate" GPU-based version of a Delaunay triangulation that isn't horrendously slow. At least, I think I would be the first. I've tried googling this so much that if there's someone out there, tell me!!!!

  2. #17
    [](){}(); manasij7479's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by algorism View Post
    For a home project I'm designing an evolution simulator. In a 2D world, the shapes and actions of the animals will evolve. Some will be herbivores, some carnivores, some a combination. The shapes and motions of their limbs will evolve as would their overall patterns of movement. The herbivores will probably just eat dots that are scattered every now and then. When I get that working I may add some senses.

    I want to do it in C++, which I don't know very well, and SDL.
    I have wanted to something like this for a long time!
    If you decide to make it open source, I would be interested in brainstorming and helping out with the C++ part!

  3. #18
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    Quote Originally Posted by manasij7479 View Post
    I have wanted to something like this for a long time!
    If you decide to make it open source, I would be interested in brainstorming and helping out with the C++ part!
    Cool. I'll try to get an initial version up on github in the next couple of weeks.

  4. #19
    Make Fortran great again
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    Speaking of the RTU project I had been working on -- about to restart my efforts on that. Someone over on the RPi forum somehow found a place in Thailand that has already made exactly what I need to make things simple yet perfect: ERE Company Limited.

    DI/DO/AI/DO boards controlled by I2C, every one of those boards is well-designed with circuit protection and a bit of filtering, the right voltages, the right resolutions, etc. Just need to pick out an MCU to go with it all really. Super-stoked.

  5. #20
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    O_o

    I've been working on something simple for once.

    I've glued a scanner to a database instance with a Raspberry Pi, Python, and Javascript so my mom can scan and tag her inherited photographs from her tablet.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

  6. #21
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    Interesting projects!

    I have a couple I am working on currently. One is a electrical circuit simulator, dedicated to the circuits in electric guitars and basses. All of the various circuit parameters are selectable from preset lists, and the output is in the form of a frequency response plotted on a log/log graph - decibel vs frequency. In addition to the parameter selection controls, the control panel also includes sliders to operate the potentiometers (volume and tone controls) in the circuit. The simulation also generates a schematic diagram of the circuit being simulated.

    The other, somewhat related project is a network analyzer (not computer networks, but electrical networks). I actually began this project to collect some electrical component data for the circuit simulator project. Electrical components typically have rated values. Musical instrument pickup coils typically do not. So I needed a way to measure those values, as they are needed in the simulator program.

    I tried using the PC audio line in and line out with electrical buffering of the input and output, and I found surprisingly good frequency response at 44.1 K sample rate, 20 Hz to 20 KHz. I expect even better performance at 96 K samples, if available. And of course any deviations can easily be calibrated out in software.

    The output of the network analyzer is, like the simulator, in the form of a decibel vs frequency graph. It also provides an oscilloscope display for monitoring signal levels and phase.

    -
    Last edited by megafiddle; 06-09-2016 at 08:53 PM.

  7. #22
    Registered User MutantJohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    O_o

    I've been working on something simple for once.

    I've glued a scanner to a database instance with a Raspberry Pi, Python, and Javascript so my mom can scan and tag her inherited photographs from her tablet.

    Soma
    So... I can kind of ​see why there'd be a Raspberry Pi and Python but what's JavaScript doing in that mix?

  8. #23
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    I can kind of ​see why there'd be a Raspberry Pi and Python but what's JavaScript doing in that mix?
    O_o

    Raspberry Pi: I see no reason to buy a new scanner with Android support, and I see no reason to lend her a laptop just so she can use a scanner.

    Python: The code behaves as a server driving the scanner, performs database operations, and links the scanned images.

    Javascipt: The Javascipt, living in an HTML page, provides the actual interface to the scanner and database.

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

  9. #24
    Registered User MutantJohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    O_o

    Raspberry Pi: I see no reason to buy a new scanner with Android support, and I see no reason to lend her a laptop just so she can use a scanner.

    Python: The code behaves as a server driving the scanner, performs database operations, and links the scanned images.

    Javascipt: The Javascipt, living in an HTML page, provides the actual interface to the scanner and database.

    Soma
    That's pretty cool.

    So how's the actual user interface with the program? By that I mean, how do they start up the application? Did you write a script that starts the Python server and opens the HTML page?

  10. #25
    Master Apprentice phantomotap's Avatar
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    So how's the actual user interface with the program? By that I mean, how do they start up the application? Did you write a script that starts the Python server and opens the HTML page?
    O_o

    We are getting off-topic a little... maybe. With respect to others, and Epy in particular, I'll go elsewhere if desired.

    One part of the Python code is a bit of purposeful server, started by a `systemd` service file with a user and group having permissions to access the scanner hardware, which reads jobs from a domain socket and knows how to complete transactions with a HTTP POST request.

    The other part of the Python code is a bit of "RESTful" (I do so very hate the word.) FCGI server, also started by a `systemd` service file but with a user and group which only has permissions to write to the domain socket and database, handles the database stuff and is responsible for requesting a scan as well as receives responses when the scan is finished.

    [Edit]
    I didn't just use CGI because I didn't want to run the HTTP server as an account with hardware permissions and the scanner may take a very long time.
    [/Edit]

    The user just opens a page up from a bookmark and Javascript throws a POST at the HTTP server.

    Just short of literally: http://address:port/scan?pid=whateve...r&res=whatever

    Soma
    “Salem Was Wrong!” -- Pedant Necromancer
    “Four isn't random!” -- Gibbering Mouther

  11. #26
    Make Fortran great again
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    By all means, discuss. Would be cool if this thread could get stickied so we could just have a permanent "projects roundtable" where we can ask questions and comment on each others' projects.

  12. #27
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Epy View Post
    By all means, discuss. Would be cool if this thread could get stickied so we could just have a permanent "projects roundtable" where we can ask questions and comment on each others' projects.
    +1

    ... now I'm going to beat myself mercilessly for having done that which I hate the most in posts anywhere.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

  13. #28
    Registered User MutantJohn's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by phantomotap View Post
    O_o

    We are getting off-topic a little... maybe. With respect to others, and Epy in particular, I'll go elsewhere if desired.

    One part of the Python code is a bit of purposeful server, started by a `systemd` service file with a user and group having permissions to access the scanner hardware, which reads jobs from a domain socket and knows how to complete transactions with a HTTP POST request.

    The other part of the Python code is a bit of "RESTful" (I do so very hate the word.) FCGI server, also started by a `systemd` service file but with a user and group which only has permissions to write to the domain socket and database, handles the database stuff and is responsible for requesting a scan as well as receives responses when the scan is finished.

    [Edit]
    I didn't just use CGI because I didn't want to run the HTTP server as an account with hardware permissions and the scanner may take a very long time.
    [/Edit]

    The user just opens a page up from a bookmark and Javascript throws a POST at the HTTP server.

    Just short of literally: http://address:port/scan?pid=whateve...r&res=whatever

    Soma
    That's pretty cool! I was wondering how you'd do it. Thanks for taking the time to explain.

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