Thread: Career Help Advice

  1. #1
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    Career Help Advice

    Hiya,

    I currently work as an embedded c programmer in a rural area in the UK and employment has dried up. I really like programming and am thinking of moving over to c++ full time as I like programming. I dont want to move to a big city as I have family now. Is it posdible to work from home over the internet in this day and age? Can you advice any websites. And what areas would you say are currently in most demand if any in C++?

    Look forward to your replies.

    Rocketman46

  2. #2
    (?<!re)tired Mario F.'s Avatar
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    I don't think working from home offers a stable career in programming. There are success stories, I know. But those opportunities usually find you; you don't search for them.

    The most likely reason for someone to be hired at a distance is because they already know your skills. Since you wish to move to a new programming language, that is not going to happen.

    I don't know your age. But if you are young, I would probably advise that instead you start your C++ study as planned, but give it one or two years working in a different area outside of programming in your local community. During that time participate in as many open source projects as you can and give it a try at websites like Rent a Coder. Establish your resume and publish it on LinkedIn stating your intention to work at a distance and stay in your area. But state your readiness to travel when the need arises.

    The plan is essentially to build a strong resume based on collaborative development, and establish yourself as a reliable and hard working developer that will deliver regardless of the distance.

    Some folks here are from UK and can advise you probably better. But I know the country well myself, having lived there briefly, going there regularly, and having a great deal of friends there. I hear Scotland is hiring like the world is going to end, for instance and that Ireland is no longer the tech mecca it used to be, but is still strong. Try to establish online friendships or relationships with tech people from around these places.
    Originally Posted by brewbuck:
    Reimplementing a large system in another language to get a 25% performance boost is nonsense. It would be cheaper to just get a computer which is 25% faster.

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    Hi thanks for your reply.

    I have been in electronics/ embedded programming for 20 years, and I am now 40. I was just half thinking c++ maybe more stable. Otherwise its is 200 mile commute each day which is not my cup of tea for work.

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    Well, choice of language is really second ... the first question is, what do you want to program?

    Do you want to continue embedded programming in C++? Or are you looking to develop applications? Or something in-between?

    If you're looking for a new (though related) career, we don't need to know what languages you know or should learn ... we need to know what you want to actually do.

    Once you know what you want to do, then the choice of language(s) comes into play.

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    Hi,

    Thanks for your reply.

    My honest answer is I don't really mind the language, I would like a bit of stability in the next 20 years of employment wise. I feel embedded jobs in the UK is quite hit and miss, and are declining. However on the job sites there seems to be more windows/ desktop programming/ banking jobs etc etc.

    So I know this is quite hard to answer but what language is here for the long haul and will be in high demand. I was guessing C++. Do you agree disagree? And what areas. Yeah I understand this is hard to answer.

    Thanks,

    Rocketman46

  6. #6
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    I can't give specific career advice myself, as I am also an embedded programmer by trade. But I can offer some general advice.

    1. Learn several languages. Different jobs might require the use of different languages, so it would be good to know several. And also, the more languages you learn, the easier it will be to learn other languages if required for a position you're seeking. I'd also suggest looking up programming jobs in your area to see what kind of qualifications they're looking for, to help determine where you should aim for in your studies.

    2. Master general programming concepts, such as standard data structures, algorithms, etc. These concepts are independent of any specific language, and very important to know.

  7. #7
    l'Anziano DavidP's Avatar
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    Is there a university near you? Research labs are often looking for coders of any kind. Email any professor in a science or enginnering department and ask if they are looking for coding help.

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