Thread: I need help debugging this entire Linux Kernel I wrote myself in about 2 weeks to on

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    I need help debugging this entire Linux Kernel I wrote myself in about 2 weeks to on



    I need help debugging this entire Linux Kernel I wrote myself in about 2 weeks to one month and I want to make a plain Linux distribution not tied to Redhat, SUSE, Debian or any other Linux Distribution and I want to prepare UNIX for the end of UNIX time in 2038 when 32-bit computers won't be able to count past January 1st 2038. However, want do these errors in the Errors folder aka directory mean in the My first Linux Kernel compressed folder. Also, I want to create a closed source fork of UNIX called Ultrix for my own upcoming planned computer company called Ultramicro. Please help as I can't seen to get the email to be recieved by GIT.
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    Registered User awsdert's Avatar
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    If you're planning a kernel replacement for unix why bother with hiding parts of the source code? All those ..... just make people think you're planning this to be private code. Anyways as side note I think the best way to protect against future time errors is to use a pointer to allocated memory, I been making a bignum project based on the ALU so you could just plug that in and let that handle the complicated stuff, on the other hand it IS slower than simply incrementing a counter and checking once a day if it needs to be reallocated (be sure to have 1 more node than using at least) and passing over to ALU when you need to do complex math for obtaining years, months, days etc.

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    and the hat of int overfl Salem's Avatar
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    This must be a troll, surely.

    > //Code Patvh:kernel/chr_dev/console.c:
    ...
    > register unsigned char a:
    Yeah, multiple lines ending with : and not ;

    > if (ORIG_VIDEO_MODE = = 7) /* Is this a monochrome display? */
    The space between = = shouldn't be there.

    > while (1) P
    More off-by-1 on the keyboard shenanigans.

    Got bored of reading after that.

    > Also, I want to create a closed source fork of UNIX called Ultrix
    Good luck in court - Ultrix - Wikipedia
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.

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    Quote Originally Posted by awsdert View Post
    If you're planning a kernel replacement for unix why bother with hiding parts of the source code? All those ..... just make people think you're planning this to be private code. Anyways as side note I think the best way to protect against future time errors is to use a pointer to allocated memory, I been making a bignum project based on the ALU so you could just plug that in and let that handle the complicated stuff, on the other hand it IS slower than simply incrementing a counter and checking once a day if it needs to be reallocated (be sure to have 1 more node than using at least) and passing over to ALU when you need to do complex math for obtaining years, months, days etc.
    I'm not hiding the parts of the source code. If you want to view them then download them. I didn't post the code because it's a lot of code and I don't know if it will fit in the the box to post it in.

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    Whatever I read that Wikipedia link and it doesn't say Ultrix was actually already an Operating System for DEC anyway. I'm not trolling, so stop acting like you know it all.

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    Registered User rstanley's Avatar
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    Salem is far more knowledgable than you give him credit for! You should listen to him.

    Linux experts are currently working on the 2038 problem.

    Some UNIXs are already corrected for the 2038 issue, if I remember correctly.

    Does your code compile without errors?

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    and the hat of int overfl Salem's Avatar
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    If you want people to seriously look at your code, then post a git repo link.

    Nobody is going to painstakingly reconstruct your code full of trivial typos and ... all over the place just to guess what you might have screwed up.
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.

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    The 2038 problem is already fixed on 64-bit arches on Linux (time_t is a 64-bit integer), and I believe it's been fixed on 32-bit arches recently too. The problem might still exist in some userland programs, though (NTP?).

    But, good luck reimplementing a Unix-like kernel by yourself. If you're technically competent, it's not at all unreasonable to get a basic kernel up and running within a few months and a fairly good kernel within a few years by yourself. It's been done by at least Torvalds, Thompson and Ritchie, Tanenbaum, and even myself. But getting a kernel working at anywhere near the level of Linux (or Free/Net/Open BSD) by yourself? Won't happen in a thousand years. Linux has been worked on by thousands of developers for nearly 30 years (BSD has been worked on by a roughly similar number of developers since the 1970s). I'm not sure how you can possibly think you would be able to do that by yourself. I'm not trying to be pessimistic or to rain on your parade; that's just the reality of the matter (especially considering the quality of code that you've shown so far).

    IMO, OP is either full of wishful/delusional thinking or a troll.

    PS. Are you reading The Art of Linux Kernel Design and typing it in by hande? I see many mistakes like using "1" (one) instead of "l" (lowercase L) that can happen from being typed by hand (or bad OCR).

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    Unfortunately, it doesn't LOL. Sorry it was very hard to follow the book and write all that code myself. I knew experts were probably working on the year 2038 problem too, but I didn't know what they needed help with and I wanted to try to write at least the kernel myself to see if that would help because I don't know what they actually need help with. I do know that I have AT&T's UNIX System V downloaded from Win World PC too, but I can't get it to do much as all I've been able to do is mount the floppy drive images an do the ls command that caused it to show a very long directory path and lock up the first time I tried to use it and the other times it won't mount the floppy disk images. I know Linux is not an independent Operating System with a flood of different distributions though and there are somethings that I don't like about that as well as somethings that I do like about that. I already email AT&T to ask how much it costs to buy a more current version of UNIX to get certified in instead of Linux especially with having to use CentOS to get Redhat Linux certified and all the major distributions to get Linux+. Sorry I should have been more specific in my initial post that I don't know what they actually need help with to regardless if I've experienced a lot of what Linux is already like to see what the Linux community needs help with and I got AT&T's Unix System V to see what that was like to see how much help they need back then to get it to what I haven't seen in modern AT&T UNIX too, but I did actually write all this myself in about 1 month during July 2020 and no it doesn't compile without bugs either and that is why I need help especially if it actually does anything to help the Linux/UNIX community. I do know that at least Linux is not as user friendly as Microsoft Windows or even Mac OS X, but Mac OS X is slow and not exactly as well designed for use with commands that Linux has like rsync as the rsync on Mac OS X has always copied everything from a specified directory even if I say I use the append option --append with the verbose option --verbose and the progress option --progress and I don't know why. As for Linux not being as user friendly as Microsoft Windows or Mac OS X I mean it doesn't have that familiar point and click feel or look to just checking a box instead of having to remember directives sometimes to turn on a feature that can sometimes be very difficult to remember directives, but I still like Linux and the same goes for all BSD or FreeBSD UNIX forks or distributions. As for AT&T's UNIX I hope it's a lot better to use once it's installed and configured properly on a system capable of running it. I spent a whole semester off in 2017 to try to learn how to program in Assembly too and wrote all the sample code in the Modern x86 Assembly book myself to, but I haven't tried to compile it yet and I know how to now too except I don't know what practical use those Sample Assembly programs from that book have by Daniel Kussworm either as know of it is geared toward writing the other half of the kernel in Assembly either and due to Assembly being Acronym hell I've had difficulty understand that code too. I'm a U. S. citizen though and a U. S. Military veteran, so I can assure you that I'm not trolling and that I just don't know if anything I did actually did anything to help the community though.

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    and the hat of int overfl Salem's Avatar
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    Is the return key on your keyboard broken all of a sudden?
    If you dance barefoot on the broken glass of undefined behaviour, you've got to expect the occasional cut.
    If at first you don't succeed, try writing your phone number on the exam paper.

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    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by LoneKernelWrite
    I don't know what they actually need help with to regardless if I've experienced a lot of what Linux is already like to see what the Linux community needs help with
    You could have asked around in mailing lists or something. But no, you had to go do your own thing then talk about how you hope it would help even though you don't know.

    Quote Originally Posted by LoneKernelWrite
    I'm a U. S. citizen though and a U. S. Military veteran, so I can assure you that I'm not trolling and that I just don't know if anything I did actually did anything to help the community though.
    I can assure you that plenty of trolls are US citizens, that members of the US military have no special protection against being trolls, and that your work has done nothing whatsoever to help the Linux or any other community. After all, they already have a kernel that works, whereas yours doesn't.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjarne Stroustrup (2000-10-14)
    I get maybe two dozen requests for help with some sort of programming or design problem every day. Most have more sense than to send me hundreds of lines of code. If they do, I ask them to find the smallest example that exhibits the problem and send me that. Mostly, they then find the error themselves. "Finding the smallest program that demonstrates the error" is a powerful debugging tool.
    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

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