Thread: C Programming Learning Curve

  1. #16
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    With the latest versions of C and C++ they have become totally different languages that only share some keywords and syntax.
    The more c you know the more you have to unlearn when moving to C++.

    Look at this hello world progs.

    Code:
    #include <stdio.h>
    int main()
    {
      printf("Hello world");
      return 0;
    }
    Code:
    #include <iostream>
    int main()
    {
      std::cout << "Hello world";
      return 0;
    }

  2. #17
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    This post is a bit of a follow up to this:
    Well... I do want to learn C++ Programming as well, but I'd just figured that I at least start with the C language and then slowly work myself right into C++; being that it's the "original" language sort of speak; right?
    I feel I should comment on this because I have been in this middle of C and C++ for the last year.

    The more c you know the more you have to unlearn when moving to C++.
    I don't find this to be true. The first language you learn always makes the second language easier, not harder.

    Speaking from the perspective of someone who has studied C++, then C, and plans to study C++ again - C++ is MUCH harder to learn as a first language. I know my C++ teacher I had in my college class believes there is no reason to learn C since C++ can do everything C can do and more, but I feel a lot of experienced programmers take for granted how difficult C++ is to learn as a first language. In my college C++ class, the only way the teacher could pass more than three students in 30-ish class size was to give out an unreasonable amount of extra credit during the last few weeks just for answering questions like "what is a prototype"? The questions had to be extremely simple even after a five-month semester. Half the students dropped by the time the class was over or just stopped showing up.

    You can learn C++ first, but based on what happened in my class, I can't imagine more than 10% of people who attempt it actually succeed. And of course, that is not to say that no one does or that there might be a lot of people on this forum that did, but this may not be a great test group population.
    Last edited by jack jordan; 11-12-2017 at 11:40 PM.

  3. #18
    C++ Witch laserlight's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by jack jordan
    Speaking from the perspective of someone who has studied C++, then C, and plans to study C++ again - C++ is MUCH harder to learn as a first language. I know my C++ teacher I had in my college class believes there is no reason to learn C since C++ can do everything C can do and more, but I feel a lot of experienced programmers take for granted how difficult C++ is to learn as a first language. In my college C++ class the only way the teacher could pass more than three students in 30-ish class size was to give out an unreasonable amount of extra credit during the last few weeks just for answering questions like "what is a prototype"? The questions had to be extremely simple even after a five month semester. Half the students dropped by the time the class was over.
    Did your teacher follow a pedagogical approach along the lines of that described by Stroustrup in Learning Standard C++ as a New Language (PDF)? A similiar approach was taken by Koenig and Moo for their academic course, later resulting in the book Accelerated C++: Practical Programming by Example, though sadly it is now outdated.
    Quote Originally Posted by Bjarne Stroustrup (2000-10-14)
    I get maybe two dozen requests for help with some sort of programming or design problem every day. Most have more sense than to send me hundreds of lines of code. If they do, I ask them to find the smallest example that exhibits the problem and send me that. Mostly, they then find the error themselves. "Finding the smallest program that demonstrates the error" is a powerful debugging tool.
    Look up a C++ Reference and learn How To Ask Questions The Smart Way

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