Thread: Creating software

  1. #1
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    Creating software

    Hey everyone

    i program with C language in general, and i finished my project.
    so i have a question - how to create a software? how to design a software? how to connect between algorithm (which i built) to software?
    i want to create one.

    i know that java and other languages are more easy to create, but i don't like thease languages. i'm connecting just to C.


    Thanks and good week

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    Registered User rstanley's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by Krewella View Post
    ...i program with C language in general, and i finished my project. ...
    If you program in C, and have finished a "Project", then you should already know the answer to your own question.

    You might want to check out, Developing Applications For Linux.

    You might want to study some of the links through the Google search, Data structures and algorithms in C

    Similar Google searches would lead to other sites, or related documents.

    Good luck.

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    Quote Originally Posted by Krewella View Post
    Hey everyone

    i program with C language in general, and i finished my project.
    so i have a question - how to create a software? how to design a software? how to connect between algorithm (which i built) to software?
    i want to create one.

    i know that java and other languages are more easy to create, but i don't like thease languages. i'm connecting just to C.


    Thanks and good week
    It depends on what compiler you use. Back in my school days 20 years ago the compiler would create programs only for a mainframe. So you could not run it on Windows. You sat there at these terminals black and green screen and it gave you an answer in text mode.

    That was for training.

    However Borland has many languages out like Paradox, DBase, etc. that creates softwares for Windows.

    If you're working in Apple/Mac you would work with something like Xcode.

    I'm not sure what platform you want to create for, but Windows has Borland and Microsoft to be the top competitors in the market. These days Borland has new softwares out that compete with 64-bit products and not the toys that I've been showing. Borland has C++ builders these days. Microsoft has like Visual C++ and its platforms, etc. that I've heard about. Talk to Embarcadero and see for Borland C++ that builds for 64-bit platforms of Windows. They also do Androids, iOS, etc. too.

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    Registered User rstanley's Avatar
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    Back in my school days 20 years ago the compiler would create programs only for a mainframe. So you could not run it on Windows.
    Not true. 30 years ago in 1986, I was learning C, and programming small C programs on and for a DOS PC, on a Lattice C Compiler, which Microsoft bought and used to create their first MS C compiler also Aztec C.

    There were other compilers for and on DOS at the time, but the names escape me at the moment.

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    Quote Originally Posted by rstanley View Post
    Not true. 30 years ago in 1986, I was learning C, and programming small C programs on and for a DOS PC, on a Lattice C Compiler, which Microsoft bought and used to create their first MS C compiler also Aztec C.

    There were other compilers for and on DOS at the time, but the names escape me at the moment.
    Thank you for righting my mistakes. I was only like 10 years old at that time. I first started on machine language programming numbers at that time. However it was like enterring all numbers in and letting the machine operate on them natively. I wasn't any good at it then. And I continue to struggle with them now. I have to go through these manuals and calculate all the opcodes and lookup tables. Ah what fun for an old timer wanna be hehe

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    Quote Originally Posted by Tien Nguyen View Post
    Thank you for righting my mistakes. I was only like 10 years old at that time. I first started on machine language programming numbers at that time. However it was like enterring all numbers in and letting the machine operate on them natively. I wasn't any good at it then. And I continue to struggle with them now. I have to go through these manuals and calculate all the opcodes and lookup tables. Ah what fun for an old timer wanna be hehe
    Just keep on it and do some more research. You'll figure it out in no time, even with your eyes closed! LoL

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    Usually creating / designing an algorithm is more complicated than converting it to a programming languages. Which language is "best" depends on what you're trying to do. Generic console programs don't need anything more than C. If working with a database, then use a database oriented language. If creating dynamic graphs and charts as part of a user interface, Visual Basic will allow you to create the user interface screens using visual drag and drop like tools, then generate the user interface part of the code for you. C++ and Microsoft Foundation Class makes some types of windows programming easier. For engineering type math, Matlab is good (but expensive, unless you're a student).

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    Quote Originally Posted by rcgldr View Post
    Usually creating / designing an algorithm is more complicated than converting it to a programming languages. Which language is "best" depends on what you're trying to do. Generic console programs don't need anything more than C. If working with a database, then use a database oriented language. If creating dynamic graphs and charts as part of a user interface, Visual Basic will allow you to create the user interface screens using visual drag and drop like tools, then generate the user interface part of the code for you. C++ and Microsoft Foundation Class makes some types of windows programming easier. For engineering type math, Matlab is good (but expensive, unless you're a student).
    There are PROs and CONs to each one though. The modern languages are really bloated. If you have the time Borland Turbo C 2.01 and Borland Turbo Assembler 4.1 are good enough. Speed is not an issue since these programs can run on NTVDM on XP that is previously discussed. Microsoft Windows XP 32-bit versions can run on QuadCore and up these days. So if you have 12 GHz systems you're going to be really flying even with a language that is obsolete like Borland Turbo C 2.01 and Borland Turbo Assembler 4.1. The CONS is you really need to study everything. That is NOT an exaggeration!! For instance if you wanted to create a pie chart you need to know algebra, VGA display programming, C and even assemlby for speed. So if you like to create from scratch and start from designing from the bottom up your way then you need to take the time and energy to study five thousand pages of texts or so.

    Modern softwares for instance like NVIDIA graphics display for texturing and shading for games are nice. However they tend to be blocky and I saw were it was modeled on a person's movement. So the major points of movements are made. This can also be done in Borland Turbo C 2.01 and Borland Turbo Assembler 4.1 and that has been proven by myself last year.

    I'm going against the masses by sticking with an outdated language however thank you JESUS CHRIST! Bless GOD, Jesus Christ, Mary, and The Holy Spirit# Then bless my real mom Huong Thi Thuyen Vu. Honours to my real mom Huong Thi Thuyen Vu. Honours to my real dad Nguyen Binh Thuy. Congratulations to my real two sisters Nguyen Khoa Thi and Nguyen Khoa Thuyen. In fact 3D simulation is also possible with Borland Turbo C 2.01 and Borland Turbo Assembler 4.1. Also, that has been proven last year too by me. So the only drawback is Microsoft might be asking for an arm and a leg for their NTVDM so you could run the 16-bit .EXE on their 64-bit Windows. Plus you have to study for years before you can handle some things. Thank you Jesus Christ.

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    When Microsoft first had NTVDM out they were easily downloadable and part of the upgrade process. However they have taken it out. If you look carefully you notice it is now in the hands of Microsoft. You have to pay a heavy price to find it again.

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