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View Full Version : Codeblocks gets a new release



indigo0086
02-28-2008, 07:13 PM
http://www.codeblocks.org/

Recently put out Release 8.02, can't wait to check it out. I am wondering if I should stick with the nightlies since I rarely noticed the difference on my projects when downloading them. This looks pretty promising.

laserlight
02-28-2008, 11:12 PM
Finally. I did say that they should have had the guts to change their version numbering scheme, and they did. Kudos to them, even if this was long overdue.

DavidP
02-29-2008, 01:11 AM
Wow.....it must have been a BIG change in the version numbering scheme.

All I know is that I have Code::Blocks version 1.0 release candidate 2, and now I go to the website and it is version 8.02.....crazy.

laserlight
02-29-2008, 01:16 AM
As stated on the front page, they are now following the "Year.Month" numbering scheme like Ubuntu Linux.

From what I remember 1.0 RC2 is a far cry from 8.02. Now I cannot decide between Code::Blocks 8.02, Microsoft Visual Studio 2005 Express and Netbeans 6 :)

Code::Blocks and Netbeans are cross platform, but Microsoft Visual Studio is what my lecturer will be recommending next semester for my software engineering project. Code::Blocks feels faster than Netbeans, has the crucial line ending switching feature which Netbeans appears to lack (!), but apparently does not have built-in strip trailing space feature, and appears less clear about its configuration files. More importantly, it lacks Java support, so I cannot seamlessly switch between C++ and Java on one IDE (but then someone will tell me to use Eclipse, haha). Choices, choices.

CornedBee
02-29-2008, 03:32 AM
With Code::Blocks you can easily switch between MSC and GCC. Can NetBeans do that?

indigo0086
02-29-2008, 05:27 AM
The only thing with codeblocks is the creators have stated that the parser is "broken" and will probably not be fixed. It's no MS with intellisense but it's alright.

Mario F.
02-29-2008, 06:38 AM
err... they will not be fixing one of the most important features of today's IDEs?
How broken is it, or is just small bugs?

I'm happy for the folks at C::B. They have been working hard these past years and produced quiet a catch of an IDE. As CornedBee reminded, C::B greatest advantge (in my opinion) is its ability to switch between compilers and remain easy to use.

39ster
02-29-2008, 07:03 AM
Ahhh codeblocks. What more can you want in an IDE? Gotta love the free stuff.

indigo0086
02-29-2008, 07:14 AM
err... they will not be fixing one of the most important features of today's IDEs?
How broken is it, or is just small bugs?



I Misrecalled, it's the code completion that is broken

http://forums.codeblocks.org/index.php/topic,7799.msg58858.html#msg58858


It was said already two years ago that the bugs in code completion would not be fixed. It was repeated many times that code completion is considered pretty much FUBAR from the bottom and that we almost certainly won't address the well-known issues in this implementation.
People still keep adding bug reports (many of which refer to the exact same issues) even today. What is this telling you?

laserlight
02-29-2008, 07:32 AM
With Code::Blocks you can easily switch between MSC and GCC. Can NetBeans do that?
No, and I suspect it (the official plugin, that is) never will, due to political reasons (open source + Sun versus Microsoft). But I could be wrong. Ease of switching between C++ and Java benefits Java developers most as they can use JNI more easily. Ease of switching between GCC and MSVC benefits C and C++ programmers only. So if Netbeans wants to really attract pure C and C++ developers, the C/C++ plugin developers need to take this into account.

In my case I just happen to be in an academic environment where I need to switch between the two languages, so C++/Java is more compelling than GCC/MSVC. But it will be nice to have your cake and eat it too. Anyone tried out Eclipse and able to vouch for it in this respect?


The only thing with codeblocks is the creators have stated that the parser is "broken" and will probably not be fixed. It's no MS with intellisense but it's alright.
The Netbeans parser is good, but the lack of refactoring support is especially frustrating since the menu option is kept in place as there is refactoring support for Java. It's like... rubbing the lack of functionality in your face :p

indigo0086
02-29-2008, 08:04 AM
Switching ide's is a nonissue for me. I'd rather have a purely dedicated C++ ide and a purely dedicated Java/C# ide. They tend to do better with working with the language than plugins or the like.

Just to re-iterate, apperantly only the Codeblocks code completion is buggy.

Also, when did they throw in that threaded seach, works pretty quick. One step away from refactoring I suppose?

indigo0086
02-29-2008, 08:36 AM
Wow, the help plugin is great as well. I neglected a lot of these plugins but some of these are great.

DavidP
02-29-2008, 09:27 AM
I have always had a thing against NetBeans. It has been several years since I have used NetBeans, and I am sure that it has changed a lot since last time I used it, but the fact is that first impressions really count. My first impression of NetBeans was that it was the absolute slowest IDE I had ever used in my life. It took ages to start up, and was still slow as I was using it. I have not used it since, and I don't think I ever will.

Code::Blocks is great, and I am excited to try out this new release. Although I really liked Code::Blocks v1.0 R2, I had a couple of issues with it. The debugger didn't seem to work very well. I couldn't seem to make it do anything - whereas Visual Studio's debugger is amazing. Does anyone else have any experience with Code::Block's debugger? I have yet to try using it in this new release.

I think both Visual Studio and Code::Blocks are awesome IDEs, and I use both. Since I rarely program in Java, that is a non-issue for me. I have Eclipse, but rarely open it.

indigo0086
02-29-2008, 09:41 AM
I've had a nice experience with Code::Blocks debugger, as long as you bring up the watches panel you can get nice functionality from it. The only times I've had problems with it are in rare nightly bug occasions where it ignores bookmarks within class definitions and you'd have to manually set a breakpoint at the call, and jump in it to get to the breakpoint in the definition. It doesn't do that now, but I've had a good experience with it in any project, wxWidgets, OpenGL etc.

And when I was taking java courses (the only time I used java in general) I started off with net-beans because it had a lot of features, most of which I didn't utilize, but I switch to eclipse about a semester in because it was so easy to pop up and play so to speak. It was fast at loading and had a debugger on par with netbeans.

and visual studio debugger is awesome as well, rather than present you with a call stack on an unhandled exception, it will jump right to the code and give you a nice explanation of it if you run the debug. In plain english too, not GCCese.

abachler
02-29-2008, 11:14 AM
A bit off topic, but does GCC support inline assembly for x64 yet? I'd switch to C::B if it did.

laserlight
02-29-2008, 11:22 AM
Code::Blocks is great, and I am excited to try out this new release. Although I really liked Code::Blocks v1.0 R2, I had a couple of issues with it. The debugger didn't seem to work very well. I couldn't seem to make it do anything - whereas Visual Studio's debugger is amazing. Does anyone else have any experience with Code::Block's debugger? I have yet to try using it in this new release.
Could that be related to the version of GDB used? The Netbeans installation instructions I followed said something about the current MinGW port of GDB being quirky, so it recommended a newer version. That might have been the problem with the version of GDB bundled with Code::Blocks 1.0 RC2. In my case I prefer my MinGW installation to be separate, so I pretty control what I have for my compiler toolchain.


A bit off topic, but does GCC support inline assembly for x64 yet? I'd switch to C::B if it did.
hmm... but why would that influence your decision, since you can use MSVC with Code::Blocks?

matsp
02-29-2008, 11:24 AM
A bit off topic, but does GCC support inline assembly for x64 yet? I'd switch to C::B if it did.

It "never hasn't" if that makes sense. - as in gcc has always supported x86_64 inline assembler since the first 3.x version of gcc that first had x86_64 support at all.

Since gcc is used to compile the Linux kernel, and the Linux kernel uses inline assembler, it is kind of critical to have this.

--
Mats

laserlight
03-01-2008, 12:15 AM
Oh, and I was wrong: Code::Blocks does have a strip trailing space feature. It is included and enabled by default under Settings -> Editor -> Strip trailing blanks.

I guess the only thing I find missing now that Netbeans has is lack of support for development in Java, but I guess I could live with more than one IDE :)

indigo0086
03-01-2008, 05:32 AM
It does have a java lexer, and you could set up the tools to a java compiler and have it compile it.

Mario F.
03-01-2008, 06:15 AM
And yet you would have to set up the compile options to individual files and set them up individually. I know, I did it ;)

Got quiet boring after a while. I don't think Java will ever be in their plans. I remember some thread on their forums some time ago where Mandrav or Thomas said exactly that.

Some support exist yes, but exists as a consequence of the open architecture of the IDE, not an actual effort to make it so. As such, some important details are left out.

In short, you can do it, but you won't like it.

indigo0086
03-01-2008, 02:36 PM
I'll stick with visual studio express and Code::Blocks. Haven't touched much java since I had my last course on it a couple of semesters ago.