PDA

View Full Version : lcd tv as monitor?



doubleanti
01-20-2008, 11:34 AM
Does anyone here use an LCD TV as a computer monitor? I'm thinking of buyin ga 42 inch 1080p LCD TV, which would be like four times bigger than my 22inch LCD, basically, and also to watch TV =)

Just wondering if this has been tried by you folks before. If I get a 720p, is that going to be too low-res on such a big screen?

Thanks for any advice!

CornedBee
01-20-2008, 11:47 AM
I have used my LCD TV as a screen on occasion. The main problem I found is that it is easily confused by resolution changes. Basically, even though the laptop was widescreen and the TV was widescreen, I couldn't convince the TV to display the widescreen resolution as widescreen.

abachler
01-21-2008, 01:31 PM
Monitor > TV.

Youa re better off getting an LCD monitor adn using it as a TV via capture card. TV's have horrible resolution.

Elysia
01-21-2008, 02:18 PM
Not FULL-HD TVs, though, but they're pretty expensive.

Neo1
01-21-2008, 03:07 PM
Not FULL-HD TVs, though, but they're pretty expensive.

So are big LCD monitors...

SlyMaelstrom
01-21-2008, 03:59 PM
Yeah, once you get over 24" or so, monitors are pretty much as expensive as TVs. To the point that if you were to utilize any of the TV's other features (like the TV tuner), then you're better off getting the TV, even though a comparable monitor will have a larger max resolution. Many people like to hook PCs up to the Sharp Aquos, and to tell you the truth, games look beautiful on it.

doubleanti
01-22-2008, 03:39 PM
I think per screen area, LCD TV's are worth more even if you don't get the high resolution. A 28 inch LCD will run you about 700ish, or 600ish, whereas you can get a 32 inch LCD TV for that much.

Anyway I don't think I need much bigger than 1920 by 1080, besides the point of me getting this is so I can watch it from a distance, and also make my room look more geeky, and productive!

Okay what about this, plasma or lcd? I like plasmas because they are easier to clean, but I heard they have less better blacks. Any ideas?

Elysia
01-22-2008, 03:45 PM
Each has their pros and cons, but LCD typically has higher resolution, so you'll find a lot more LCD with FULL-HD than plasma. Plasma vs. LCD is a hot debate and I don't think you'll get a straight answer.

zacs7
01-22-2008, 03:52 PM
Depends where you live, but a plasma will make your room hot :)

Not to mention, they need to be re-gassed which is expensive :s -- so it really depends on 'how long' you want to be geeky.

Perspective
01-22-2008, 03:58 PM
Plasmas will burn-in, LCDs won't. So if you want to use it regularly with your computer I think LCD is the way to go.

doubleanti
01-22-2008, 04:19 PM
Yeah there is the issue of burn-in, but I've heard they have this pixel-shift technology which moves the pixels slightly so that burn in isn't so much an issue, I think I've heard something like that.

In which case, also, I will use my screen saver =) But does anyone know more about that particular issue?

brewbuck
01-22-2008, 05:18 PM
Does anyone here use an LCD TV as a computer monitor? I'm thinking of buyin ga 42 inch 1080p LCD TV, which would be like four times bigger than my 22inch LCD, basically, and also to watch TV =)

Just wondering if this has been tried by you folks before. If I get a 720p, is that going to be too low-res on such a big screen?

Thanks for any advice!

The problem is that the screen is so large, you have to sit far away from it. This presents some interesting ergonomic issues. Don't try to sit on the couch with a wireless keyboard/mouse and try to use it. You'll kill your wrists, neck, back, and other things. Lying down is also a bad idea.

You'll need some kind of legitimate workstation to sit at.

(I know all this because I've done it.)

SlyMaelstrom
01-22-2008, 08:16 PM
Plasmas will burn-in, LCDs won't. So if you want to use it regularly with your computer I think LCD is the way to go.LCDs burn in as well for the first X amount of hours and I do believe any LCD that is designed to have a constant image on it (like a computer monitor, for example) is generally run past the burn-in stage by the manufacturer before it is sold. I wouldn't quote me on that, though. Either way, if you're gonna go for the TV option, LCD or Plasma, you should keep the contrast down for the first few weeks. However they definitely face burn-in (or something similar to it) issues and Apple has taken a lot of heat in the past for this.

In reality the difference between LCD and Plasma these days are very minor and nothing like what it used to be. The technologies have become pretty similar and generally face the same problems.

EDIT: Looking into it, what happens with LCDs seem to be consider "image retention" rather than "burn-in." It is similar effects from similar causes but for dissimilar reasons.

doubleanti
01-23-2008, 12:24 PM
I see. Oh and what's this thing about re-gassing? I hadn't heard of that.

Well, about the ergonomics, yes I don't intend to use a wireless keyboard and mouse, that is so uncomfortable as it is I don't see why people do it. I have a corner-desk setup, with a 22 inch lcd on one side and a 17 on the other, I intend to put the LCD-TV on the wall aside the edge of the desk, so I'll be using desk-space for keyboard and mouse-age, not to mention I'll be using it for a TV. The room is rather large, so.... maybe I should do something crazy like... put a couch and a coffee table in there... okay that'd be pretty packed.

Does anyone have any recommendations as to which particular brand I should buy? Visios are inexpensive and I think tigerdirect had one for cheap. If I hear enough good things about them, there's a 42 inch 1080p I'll be looking at. Though it is refurbished, maybe I should avoid that. Any tips would be greatly appreciated.

zacs7
01-23-2008, 02:17 PM
Further research shows that re-gassing plasmas is a myth, it can't be done. However, some people are still convinced that it can be done. So believe what you like ;), either way -- everyone seems to agree you'll get about 30,000 hours of use out of a plasma TV before it starts to deteriorate.

Personally I'd go with LCD, since it's 'familiar' technology -- my screen seems to work fine!

matsp
01-23-2008, 02:27 PM
30K hours -> nearly 3.5 years at 100% duty cycle. If you "only" use your computer/TV for a few hours a day, that shouldn't be a problem at all. If you use it all 24/7, then maybe it's not the best solution.

--
Mats

Elysia
01-23-2008, 02:28 PM
The problems with LCD and Plasma are different.
Plasma can suffer from burn-ins simply because the high temperature. The layer (whatever material is used) can be "burned" with the pixels, thus always displaying them.
For LCD, it's different. They mostly suffer from "ghosting," since they build from liquid crystals. These crystals has to align to let through or block light to the screen, thus creating the image. If they crystals can't realign fast enough, you get some parts from the previous frame and some from the current, which is known as "ghosting."
Still, many of today's TVs don't have either of these problems.
Oh and LCD TVs may require replacing the back lightning bulbs if they break and it costs a fortune. But neither my LCD TV nor computer screen has required such a thing yet.

As for that, LCDs and Plasma how about the same life length I think.

SlyMaelstrom
01-23-2008, 05:46 PM
Oh and LCD TVs may require replacing the back lightning bulbs if they break and it costs a fortune. But neither my LCD TV nor computer screen has required such a thing yet.

As for that, LCDs and Plasma how about the same life length I think.I've had the backlight inverter replaced on a monitor. It's wasn't that expensive, maybe $60 for the part and $40 for the install, and replacing the bulb would be even cheaper (though the bulb is rarely the problem). You can even do it yourself if you're kind of handy. A large screen TV may be a different story, though.

zacs7
01-24-2008, 03:34 PM
Have you considered waiting for a 'digital projector' or whatever they're called?
I've heard about them, just as good as the analog projectors, except there's no globes that die every 100 hours or whatever.

Once again, Urban myth or truth -- Only research would give the answer.

Elysia
01-24-2008, 03:39 PM
That will probably cost even more.
It's best not to buy the newest advancement in science since it's usually not worth the cost.
But even so, there's another question: which one is best - TV or projector? :)

SlyMaelstrom
01-24-2008, 07:08 PM
But even so, there's another question: which one is best - TV or projector? :)In terms of what? Picture quality? If that's what you're asking then the answer is projector, by far. Could I tell you why? No. However, I know plenty of video experts that would agree unanimously on that statement.

However, if you're asking about cost and maintenance, then the answer is TV. And by that... in my own opinion, overall TV is better for any kind of home theater because I, like most, don't have time for the maintenance that projectors require.

Elysia
01-25-2008, 04:35 AM
Indeed, and as we see, there is a heated discussion there, as well.
You'll have to take factors into mind to have a proper place to project the image, as well, for example.
So it depends on if you want a projector really...