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Dino
01-10-2008, 02:15 PM
I've been looking at some different colleges for courses in C++. Two immediate problems with this approach:

1) They all want you to follow a career path. I have a career.
2) With the career path, courses are $400+ per credit hour, and there's all these courses in front of (prereq-ing) the ones I want to take.

If you wanted to get hooked up with a C++ programming course, what would YOU do?

Todd

mike_g
01-10-2008, 03:07 PM
First off: what do you want the qualification for?

I did C++ as a free external module, as the foundation degree I am doing does not cover it. Although I wasent around for any classes it wernt hard, just had to write a simple prog and sit a test.

That said it dosent necessarily mean I can create anything useful with the language. IMHO the best way to learn is just read about, and experiment with stuff. You don't need a college course for that, unless you want some sort of certification. Theres tons of stuff on the net. Also as far a programming ability is concerned I think a completed project would say a lot more about someones ability than any college course would.

Personally I wouldn't waste my money :)

Dino
01-10-2008, 03:20 PM
Well, I'm coming at this from 2 different perspectives.

First, I want in-depth C++. Everything I've done so far with C++ is self-taught:


start a project ;
while(1) {
define my next coding objective ;
do {
read the book ;
hack up a solution ;
} (while testing still fails) ;
if (finished) break ;
}


I'm looking for best practices, advanced techniques, etc. Unix and/or Linux systems programming (aka, leveraging the operating system). I also want to get into some GUI's.

And, while C++ is a target of mine, I also want to bone up more on C and Java too.

Second, I never went to college, and if I am going to "pay for education", I might as well have it applied to a degree.

I'm considering pulling the trigger on an online course through a college in Florida, and have even ordered the required textbooks, but it's $1,500+ for the one class, and it's just a pre-req about the importance of information systems. Geez. I've been in the industry for 28 years - I think I understand that one already.

Todd

mike_g
01-10-2008, 03:38 PM
Unfortunately for me theres non 'in-depth' programming courses in my college; nor in the county that I live in it seems.

But anyway, if you have a career you want to keep what good is a piece of paper going to do for you? I would just find something I take an interest in and have a bash at it. Theres nothing a teacher is going to tell you that you cant find on the net. If you want to make GUI apps just focus on that. Maybe you could make a perfect MS paint clone for Linux? That would be useful and doable by one person. Even if it turns out a hideous mess you learn from your mistakes.

whiteflags
01-10-2008, 04:11 PM
1) They all want you to follow a career path. I have a career.

If you want to get out of pre-requisites, ask the college about the CLEP exam and take that. You may have to wait a while for the next exam, but it will allow you to apply your work experience towards your academic career.


2) With the career path, courses are $400+ per credit hour, and there's all these courses in front of (prereq-ing) the ones I want to take.

Holy crap, why not just take a course at a community college where you live? In-district tuition is always cheaper. This is how I'm going to college right now.


But anyway, if you have a career you want to keep what good is a piece of paper going to do for you?

One reason to continue education is that, at least in other fields, you get to stay employable.

Sang-drax
01-10-2008, 05:24 PM
Prerequirements are not set in stone at all. Talk to the professor or the department secretary and they will be able to help you.

DavidP
01-10-2008, 07:43 PM
Why don't you attend a local community college? They usually cost much less, and even though they might not be as intense as a university, many community colleges still provide a good education. Then, if you want to apply it towards a degree, you can transfer your credits to a university and work towards a degree.

I know where I live there is an excellent community college with 2 or 3 C++ courses.



woah woah woah. I just saw that you (Todd) are from Katy Texas. When I said "where I live" I meant exactly that...because that is where I am from too.

Dude...

Check out Cy-Fair Community College just off of West Road and Barker Cypress. They have C++ courses.

Dino
01-10-2008, 07:52 PM
lol!

I just signed up at Houston Comm. College (Fry & I-10). Decided to take a College Algebra course first. $326 is a whole lot better than the equiv Univ. course for $1500+. I may try Cy Fair next go round. Thanks!

Todd

indigo0086
01-14-2008, 09:39 AM
Go to comm college and let the state pay for most of your tuition.

Prelude
01-14-2008, 10:03 AM
Buy a good book and save the rest of your money. ;)

Dino
01-14-2008, 10:11 AM
Well, I work out of the house. Most of my days are in front of the computer or in a technical book. I think interacting with other humans at a technical level, face to face, is a good thing. :)

Class start tomorrow night. I hope I'm not bored out of my gourd.

indigo0086
01-14-2008, 10:15 AM
you're one of THOSE programmers...who like people. be lucky you're getting a purely C++ course , near the last days of my C++ course my teacher was already handing out course flyers on java which was the "new think in programming".

But enjoy the class anyway, you'll like C++. She's not the prettiest thing on earth, but has a great personality.