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Maragato
08-31-2007, 04:41 PM
Folks hallo, I´m up to graduate and I wonder which books are the must haves. I wont have a library so easily at my disposition out of university so I started to buy some books, So far I got:
C Programming Language, C++ Programming Language.
The books from Aho Compilers Principles and Tools. Are there any other MUST haves? I wonder about things like Advanced Programming in the Unix Environment or the Sedgewick algorithms book, if those should I get in C or C++? Anyway thanks a lot for the attention :)

Rashakil Fol
08-31-2007, 06:28 PM
Structure and Interpretation of Computer Programs

The Emacs Lisp manual :-)

Artificial Intelligence: A Modern Approach

The Art of Computer Programming, Vols. 1-4

ssharish2005
09-01-2007, 12:51 PM
If you thinking of to buying a book, it would be better after you join the uni, by the time you should be knowing what you would be studying in the uni.

Perhaps your lecture would give you some guidance, which book to buy. This gives you mode idea. Rather if you could buy and random books.

But so far the books which you have bought is a good choice.

ssharish2005

Maragato
09-01-2007, 01:24 PM
If you thinking of to buying a book, it would be better after you join the uni, by the time you should be knowing what you would be studying in the uni.

Perhaps your lecture would give you some guidance, which book to buy. This gives you mode idea. Rather if you could buy and random books.

But so far the books which you have bought is a good choice.

ssharish2005

Man Im graduation in Computer Science Im getting OUTTA UNI :P

ssharish2005
09-01-2007, 02:00 PM
Ohh sorry, thought the other way around....

ssharish2005

matsp
09-01-2007, 04:32 PM
I would say these things:
1. You can never have too many books.
2. Buy books that interest you - not ones that other people think you should have.
3. If you are looking for a job in a particular area, look into books in that area.

--
Mats

Maragato
09-01-2007, 07:22 PM
I would say these things:
1. You can never have too many books.
2. Buy books that interest you - not ones that other people think you should have.
3. If you are looking for a job in a particular area, look into books in that area.

--
Mats

Man Im brazilian money is an issue I cant buy many books.

ssharish2005
09-01-2007, 07:47 PM
The points which Mat has stated is all right. Make up your mind and think on which topic are u interested in and on whcih topic you wanted to master.

It all depends up on you

ssharish2005

indigo0086
09-02-2007, 05:52 AM
Just don't buy a bad book that looks interesting, thereby wasting your brazilian money.

Maragato
09-02-2007, 10:08 AM
Just don't buy a bad book that looks interesting, thereby wasting your brazilian money.

That is why I ask. I think the Sedgewick´s books are also must haves right?

indigo0086
09-02-2007, 12:40 PM
according to the second rule we shouldn't be giving advice ;b

I was just highlighting that one should take advice from others about what books they should buy on certain subjects being that you don't have the experience to recommend a "good book" to yourself.

matsp
09-02-2007, 04:29 PM
Sorry, my previous answer was perhaps a little bit brief. To expand:

It is of course not a bad idea to ask "If I want a book on the subject of <some subject> which one should I choose?" - particularly if you are looking at two that seem similar from what you can find, which to choose can be hard, but if you just ask "which book should I buy", then people will list their favourite books/authors - but those are not necessarily the subjects you want to buy in the first place.

There is far more computer science (and related subjects) out there that it is almost impossible for ANYONE to master all of it. Do you think you need a book on Open Source Licensing - I've got one, I have browsed it, but I haven't read it thoroughly, because I don't really see a need for it - I'm not about to release any major projects as Open Source any time soon... I have books about OpenGL which I willl need to understand soon, as my new work is about that.

I have books about Pascal - not a very "modern" subject, so I doubt ANYONE would be interested in that. Likewise on Wirth's Modula2 version of "algorithms+datastructures" - not a bad book, but certainly not for a C-programmer.

If you are interested in Real-time OS's, there's books about that - but if you're not going to work on RTOS code (or code on top of RTOS), then it's a waste of money and time to buy and read even a single one of those books - because you can get much more relevant information from books closer related to the subject you DO need to work with.

And, no, I don't have infinite budget for books. [A friend of mine had to turn off his "one-click-buy" at Amazon because it was eating too much of his wages - I'm not THAT bad].

--
Mats

Maragato
09-03-2007, 05:46 PM
Well I ask cause despite the amount of books being enormous there is a given set of them which surely are must haves, like the Bible for the catholics omfg I hope no one is offended on this comparison I could not find a better, yet there are "infinite" books there is always a "fundamental set" that is why I ask :)

whiteflags
09-03-2007, 07:10 PM
Well I ask cause despite the amount of books being enormous there is a given set of them which surely are must haves, like the Bible for the catholics omfg I hope no one is offended on this comparison I could not find a better, yet there are "infinite" books there is always a "fundamental set" that is why I ask :)

Well I think Mats second point is his brightest:


2. Buy books that interest you - not ones that other people think you should have

In the same vein, I never buy books on recommendation alone. You should take the time to peruse a book's content before you purchase it, so that you know the material is accessable to you. Recommendations are good: consider them first. But it won't do you any good if you just can't read or understand the material. Trust me, there are plenty of experts who can't write on technical subjects.

Really there is no bible - you're going to have to find your own material to live by: it is different for almost everyone. I am not aware of any book that is always a positive experience for everyone that reads it. I think Rashakil Fol and some others mentioned good books. You should actually get to a book store and look at them.

DavidP
09-03-2007, 07:59 PM
Unix Network Programming - Volume 1: Networking APIs - Sockets and XTI

This is pretty much the Bible on network programming (even if it says Unix, everything applies to other platforms as well). It is a must have.

Code Complete

This is a good book on using good coding standards.

Assembly Language Primer for the IBM PC & XT

This book is really old, but I think it is the best Assembly language book out there, to be quite honest. It teaches things very clearly. If you can find it, get it - but it might be hard to find.

Along with these...pretty much any good C/C++ reference is good to have, as well as some sort of Java reference.

Maragato
09-03-2007, 08:14 PM
This one?
http://www.amazon.de/UNIX-Network-Programming-Sockets-Networking/dp/013490012X/ref=sr_1_3/302-5348722-9679237?ie=UTF8&s=books-intl-de&qid=1188871909&sr=1-3
Also anyone here ever bought this used books on ebay maybe I can save some dimes on those. Are the books oki?



In the same vein, I never buy books on recommendation alone. You should take the time to peruse a book's content before you purchase it, so that you know the material is accessable to you. Recommendations are good: consider them first. But it won't do you any good if you just can't read or understand the material. Trust me, there are plenty of experts who can't write on technical subjects.

Thanks a lot for the reply, the point is I have already read most of these books so Im using the recommendations as a confirmation of my previous intents, it is more about not rushing in a not so must have book, if people give me the advices and names I have time and feed back to think about what Im getting.

DavidP
09-03-2007, 10:26 PM
yep that one :)

Maragato
09-09-2007, 07:57 PM
And what about the compiler book from Aho Im wondering about buying the second edition from (Januar 1986) I used it in my compilers class and googled a lot and it seems a very famous book, the new edition from 2006 is like 6x more expensive Im not sure if it is worthy can someone give me a light on this?

matsp
09-10-2007, 02:46 AM
And what about the compiler book from Aho Im wondering about buying the second edition from (Januar 1986) I used it in my compilers class and googled a lot and it seems a very famous book, the new edition from 2006 is like 6x more expensive Im not sure if it is worthy can someone give me a light on this?

Until you actually need a book like that, the new version may be "better", but if you are not writing compiler type code, what use is the book.

--
Mats

Maragato
09-12-2007, 05:34 PM
Until you actually need a book like that, the new version may be "better", but if you are not writing compiler type code, what use is the book.

--
Mats

Man sorry I couldn`t understand your post can you please maybe use a different way to express your idea :/
Thanks a lot for the reply.

matsp
09-13-2007, 01:56 AM
Man sorry I couldn`t understand your post can you please maybe use a different way to express your idea :/
Thanks a lot for the reply.

That may be part my fault, re-reading the post, it is a bit cryptic (it was very clear in my head - but my fingers obviously didn't do it justice when typing it in :-) ).

Anyways, my point is that it's very little good in buying books unless you actually are going to use the book. I doubt that the subject matter of the book has changed much, but it may be slightly extended and most likely updated to use more modern tools and such - but that's still minor details.

--
Mats

Maragato
09-13-2007, 07:49 AM
Oki, and what about the books from sedgewicks and cormen? I think sedgewick more hands on but cormen is more complete as far as Ive read.

Cheeze-It
09-13-2007, 08:05 AM
Every Computer Scientist should have this in their library. It's a must.

http://www.amazon.com/Easiest-Way-Meet-Pick-Girls-Ever/dp/1419644513/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2_s9_rk/103-8103885-2443017?ie=UTF8&s=books&s9r=8a5801be1145d82801115f098db303e4&itemPosition=2&qid=1189692175&sr=8-2


ZING!

(lol i rule).

Maragato
09-13-2007, 08:10 AM
Every Computer Scientist should have this in their library. It's a must.

http://www.amazon.com/Easiest-Way-Meet-Pick-Girls-Ever/dp/1419644513/ref=pd_bbs_sr_2_s9_rk/103-8103885-2443017?ie=UTF8&s=books&s9r=8a5801be1145d82801115f098db303e4&itemPosition=2&qid=1189692175&sr=8-2


ZING!

(lol i rule).

I just ordered it! :p
Or maybe I should go for the Design Patterns book from Gamma ? :/