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pianorain
08-08-2007, 10:12 AM
...but not a computer language. Seeing as people generally prefer to read syntactically correct sentences, I was hoping someone could help me out with a grammar problem.
Dying but not yet fallen on the lush grass below...I really don't think 'fallen' is the correct verb tense there, but I'm not sure. Anyone got a copy of the standard for English or at least know of some sort of grammar rule that can help me out?

brewbuck
08-08-2007, 10:56 AM
...but not a computer language. Seeing as people generally prefer to read syntactically correct sentences, I was hoping someone could help me out with a grammar problem.
Dying but not yet fallen on the lush grass below...I really don't think 'fallen' is the correct verb tense there, but I'm not sure. Anyone got a copy of the standard for English or at least know of some sort of grammar rule that can help me out?

It's correct. I can't rigorously say why, but as a native speaker, it sounds right to me.

EDIT: By the way, there's no standard for English :)

twomers
08-08-2007, 11:10 AM
It sounds a little bit akward, if you know what I mean. I think putting a "having" somewhere might make it ring better - dying but having not yet fallen on the lush grass below. And maybe a ',' after the dying might work too. The former point is dependant on what comes after "..." really. Well, MS Word doesn't complain about it :rolleyes: good reassurance, eh? ;)

siavoshkc
08-08-2007, 11:21 AM
I think the phrase is correct. Dying and Fallen are both adjectives there not verb.

robwhit
08-08-2007, 11:39 AM
I'd use "Dying but not yet fallen onto the lush grass below..."

QuestionC
08-08-2007, 12:54 PM
I guess it is a little ambiguious, since you can't decidedly parse it out between

((dying but not yet fallen) on the lush grass below)
or

(dying but not yet (fallen on the lush grass below))
And it would be nice to see the noun being modified.

But the verb tense is appropriate. I believe you almost always use the past participle to modify nouns... consider another word with an odd past imperfect...

eat/ate/eaten
Which sounds better,

decomposing but not yet eaten

decomposing but not yet ate

Perhaps the problem is that 'fell' is not appropriate, but 'felled' -is- because 'fell' has two meanings.


Dying but not yet felled on the lush grass below...
Does work

h3ro
08-08-2007, 04:47 PM
I guess it is a little ambiguious, since you can't decidedly parse it out between
Quote:
((dying but not yet fallen) on the lush grass below)
or
Quote:
(dying but not yet (fallen on the lush grass below))

Hahaha, would love to see teachers do that :D

pianorain
08-08-2007, 09:22 PM
But the verb tense is appropriate. I believe you almost always use the past participle to modify nouns... consider another word with an odd past imperfect...

Perhaps the problem is that 'fell' is not appropriate, but 'felled' -is- because 'fell' has two meanings.Thanks for that. That sounds technical enough to work for me.

brewbuck
08-08-2007, 10:54 PM
I guess it is a little ambiguious, since you can't decidedly parse it out between
((dying but not yet fallen) on the lush grass below)
or
(dying but not yet (fallen on the lush grass below))


There is a third parse, namely:



((dying but not yet fallen on) the lush grass below)


Of course, "fallen upon" would be more correct that "fallen on," but the latter might be used colloquially, as in:



Dying but not yet fallen on, the lush grass below quivered in the wind.


I.e., the subject of the sentence is the grass, which is dying, and has not yet had an object fall on it. If you still can't see it, substitute "trodden" for "fallen."