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HunterCS
07-23-2007, 01:35 PM
Ok so I am fairly good at math, but unfortunatly in high I never went past basic allgebra and geometry.

What I'm wondering is, how important is a good knowledge of mathematics to being able to program well? Do I need to pick up some text books and greatly extend my knowledge?

mike_g
07-23-2007, 01:41 PM
That depends entirely on what you want to code.

dwks
07-23-2007, 01:41 PM
Math always helps, but you can program without knowing much about it. It depends on the types of programs you want to write, of course. I can think of several people who started C or C++ programming before they were even in high school, so post-algebra math is by no means an ironclad requirement. :)

HunterCS
07-23-2007, 02:33 PM
Well I don't plan to make a big career out of programming. It was more like, I didn't know how too, and that irritated me. So I'm learning. Basically I plan on just making basic programs, maybe a game or two when I get better.

IdioticCreation
07-23-2007, 03:23 PM
You should probably know some geometry and trig if you want to work on games. I didn't really know much trig when I started. I just learned the stuff as I needed it.

francoissoft
07-23-2007, 05:48 PM
Been programming for a while but I have never used much math. If you get into 3D games it is likely that you will be using some library with functions that do the math.

Rashakil Fol
07-23-2007, 09:07 PM
Knowledge of mathematical facts is not important at all. Aptitude for formal reasoning seems important, though. Note that I mean "aptitude," not that you've ever done it before. You'll end up thinking in that pattern when writing programs. Unless you write code randomly and pray...

The fact that math ability correlates with programming ability has to do with this. It's the ability to _think_ that matters.

Brad0407
07-23-2007, 09:39 PM
Knowledge of mathematical facts is not important at all. Aptitude for formal reasoning seems important, though. Note that I mean "aptitude," not that you've ever done it before. You'll end up thinking in that pattern when writing programs. Unless you write code randomly and pray...

The fact that math ability correlates with programming ability has to do with this. It's the ability to _think_ that matters.
Unless you are programming a math engine, you won't directly be using much math. However, like Rashakil Fol says, it is a way of thinking. The reason that Calculus is required for majors that would otherwise need very little math is that Calculus trains your mind to think in a specific way that helps with that major.

Dave++
07-24-2007, 02:07 PM
Well I don't plan to make a big career out of programming. It was more like, I didn't know how too, and that irritated me. So I'm learning. Basically I plan on just making basic programs, maybe a game or two when I get better.

Hunter, when I first learned about "flowcharts" in third grade...I flowcharted everything. "How to sharpen a pencil" and even "How to take a c___". That was 1970. And so there sat a bunch of boxes and questions that branched to multiple states (didn't even know what a state was) on a 11x8.5 paper that kept me from getting bored in school.

Programming is inherently more mathematical in and of itself than people give it credit. So in some ways when your really doing a good job at programming you're doing math using "graphs". Its just more topographical than algebraic.

Something like that...

Dave++

VirtualAce
07-24-2007, 10:56 PM
Moved to GD.