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h3ro
04-09-2007, 02:59 PM
I started to wonder, what language do people program in? I donít mean which computer language, but what language do you use on your comments and variables?

I am Norwegian, but still I write code in English. It feels more natural to me, and makes stuff so much easier when I need to show my code or ask for help online. But I went to an international school, so I am used to do everything in English anyway, so I guess that is the reason for me doing it in English.

So, what about you?

prog-bman
04-09-2007, 04:03 PM
English.

SlyMaelstrom
04-09-2007, 06:11 PM
leetspeak.

... make that reverse leetspeak... with a Canadian accent.

OnionKnight
04-09-2007, 06:40 PM
English, as well as for comments even though the code will only be read by other swedes and probably never be released to the outside. I prefer it this way as pretty much any documentation, message boards and so on will be in English so you're only making things worse for yourself by not being fluent in English. I also find that Swedish is a pretty crappy language when it comes to technical stuff, it all sounds so awkward.

Queatrix
04-09-2007, 06:40 PM
The only language I know. :( ..... English.

cerin
04-09-2007, 07:02 PM
This has been talked about before and everyone draws the conclusion that if you want to program english is basically the language you have to do it in and translated equivalents don't work out well or there just isn't the demand. I program in English.

indigo0086
04-09-2007, 07:21 PM
Engurisu!

Sentral
04-09-2007, 07:36 PM
Chinese.

laserlight
04-09-2007, 08:08 PM
English.

-JM
04-09-2007, 08:10 PM
igpay atinlay

Dave_Sinkula
04-09-2007, 09:30 PM
FWIW:

http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#writewell
If you are asking questions in a forum that does not use your native language, you will get a limited amount of slack for spelling and grammar errors — but no extra slack at all for laziness (and yes, we can usually spot that difference). Also, unless you know what your respondent's languages are, write in English. Busy hackers tend to simply flush questions in languages they don't understand, and English is the working language of the Internet. By writing in English you minimize your chances that your question will be discarded unread.BTW: English, my only language.

alphaoide
04-09-2007, 09:45 PM
English

VirtualAce
04-09-2007, 10:56 PM
English is that language I program in.

KONI
04-10-2007, 12:38 AM
I program in a ROT13 encryption of Mapudungun (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Mapudungun).

Since I know 5 languages perfectly well, I used to program in German several years ago but as soon as I had to show my code to others or started posting in forums, I switched to English.

CornedBee
04-10-2007, 02:07 AM
My native language is German, but I use English for several reasons.

1) I feel more comfortable talking about computers and everything computer-related in English, since that's the language I learned this stuff in.
2) German has diacritics like ä, and putting non-ASCII characters into source files is usually asking for trouble. Replacing the characters with their ASCII equivalents (ae) is ugly.
3) I hate mixing German comments with English function and variable names.
4) I hate mixing German variable names with English function and type names even more.

twomers
04-10-2007, 11:51 AM
English. I should be patriotic sometime and try it in Irish ... Heh. In fact I think I shall :)

SlyMaelstrom
04-10-2007, 12:40 PM
I dunno, twomers, I'd have to see your code before I'd accept you saying that... cause if I looked in those comments and saw "little" instead of "wee" or "budweiser" instead of "guiness", I'd be disappointed.

twomers
04-10-2007, 12:54 PM
I dunno, twomers, I'd have to see your code before I'd accept you saying that... cause if I looked in those comments and saw "little" instead of "wee" or "budweiser" instead of "guiness", I'd be disappointed.

FYI little = beag, guiness = Guinness, capitalisation is very important.

I guess I'd have to be drunk to do the whole patriotic thing justice ... Poitín (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Poit%C3%ADn) may have to replace the normal coffee. I may have to charge up my laptop and find a convenient field and make a thatched cottage before I get the real effect ... I'll keep a diary ... and in the spirit true Irish literature I'll keep it bleak, depressing and full of no hope.

edit: Why would I talk about Budweiser in a program ...
edit2: Oh. And spuds. Yes. How could I forget.

SlyMaelstrom
04-10-2007, 01:17 PM
// Will figure this out tomorrow... had too many Budweisers */
Commented like a drunk person, no less.

twomers
04-10-2007, 01:32 PM
// Will figure this out tomorrow... not feeling well
Or ...

// deanfidh mé é amárach ... táim breoite ... tá and baine ag damhsa!!
Not sure how much it would be appreciated on the boards ... I could say my English isn't good and get pity points though.

SlyMaelstrom
04-10-2007, 01:39 PM
// not feeling welland
// had too many Budweisersare conditionally inequivilent.

twomers
04-10-2007, 01:44 PM
You don't think one can lead to the other? Try mixing it with milk and tell me how you feel.

SMurf
04-10-2007, 04:35 PM
I did wonder a while back if people worldwide would be happier with a source code document format that specifies which language is used, so keywords like class, long, private, etc. could be written in the preferred human language and then translated.

At the moment is seems as if English is a prerequisite for programming, which I find slightly odd given that web pages have language identifiers and stuff (although tags are still English words and abbrev.).

Bearing in mind that the whole point of programming languages is to give people the ability to express their needs to a computer.

whiteflags
04-10-2007, 05:28 PM
At the moment is seems as if English is a prerequisite for programming, which I find slightly odd given that web pages have language identifiers and stuff

English is the second most popular language in the world, and it doesn't help that the earlist computers were invented and used by English speaking people. Thus we've had to deal with all sorts of technical issues when it comes to supporting other languages. (A necessary thing as the digital divide gets smaller and smaller.) To make my point, I still don't understand multibyte characters, multibyte streams, and Unicode that well. I don't think I will fully understand either of those until I start working and learn how they work exactly, because it seems to come coupled with platform-specific code. I'd rather not have to learn two things poorly. (And that's a big reason why I've never released anything. Working in ASCII seems pretty sad in the 21st century.)

Anyway, the real point here is supporting a basic ascii character set seems smart on the lower level. A char carries the weight of the whole set: it's small, simple to parse, and supported on all keyboards. So, you know, support for other languages comes way later after you've finished what the program does and need to start working on a user interface. You only start working on the user interface in any commercial product after you've figured out who's gonna be using it.

And communication tools like web browsers are a bit different since (at the time of this writing) the net is free for all, and everyone can choose to communicate. Web browsers should be able to load different character sets. Think of how disappointed the anime fans would be if they couldn't read pages in Japanese. ;)

Well... that was just a little poke at some of you. No offense.

MadCow257
04-10-2007, 06:07 PM
From what I've seen the only other programming langauge is japanese

Are there many japanese people here?

nvoigt
04-11-2007, 12:23 AM
My native language is German, but I use English for several reasons.

1) I feel more comfortable talking about computers and everything computer-related in English, since that's the language I learned this stuff in.
2) German has diacritics like š, and putting non-ASCII characters into source files is usually asking for trouble. Replacing the characters with their ASCII equivalents (ae) is ugly.
3) I hate mixing German comments with English function and variable names.
4) I hate mixing German variable names with English function and type names even more.


Aye!

KONI
04-11-2007, 12:27 AM
Are there many japanese people here?

Probably not, since given their working moral, they perform ritual Harakiri (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Harakiri) when their code doesn't compile.

As for declarative tags in english, feel free to write a localized DTD or XML Schema for your language and the corresponding XSLT to convert it to the standard english DTD.

-JM
04-11-2007, 06:48 AM
feel free to write a localized DTD or XML Schema for your language and the corresponding XSLT to convert it to the standard english DTD.
Right, I'm on it...

ulillillia
04-17-2007, 05:41 PM
I program in C for the main part, but as comments, it's always English since it's the only language I know.