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View Full Version : Is it just me, or is the polynomial program popular?



CaptainMorgan
10-04-2006, 10:04 PM
I now have to write one for a course, and I did one in C last year. I don't see the joy in them to be honest. I'd much rather develop something more business oriented, such as a database(using C/C++) with company info for just one example. So why do a lot of programming courses impose this program? What's your opinion? Is it just a mathematics thing? I understand that to Calculus, the polynomial is a nice function... but...

-Cheers

laserlight
10-05-2006, 03:02 AM
What exactly is "the polynomial program"?

lilrayray
10-05-2006, 04:23 AM
Im going to assume it is a program that solves polynomials. The programming courses at my school tend compliment the math courses so it isnt that unusual.

CaptainMorgan
10-05-2006, 02:20 PM
Sorry about that, must've overlooked the General Discussion section.

Ya, polynomial programs in general. So that's it, it's just a compliment to mathematics? Why isn't limits, trig identities and radical conjugates implemented? I dunno, it's no big deal, just curious.

-Cheers

dwks
10-05-2006, 05:13 PM
Why isn't limits, trig identities and radical conjugates implemented?
Perhaps the creaters of the course thought you'd have your hands full with a polynomial program. :) Maybe it's a tradition, like "Hello, world!" and a calculator and hangman.

System_159
10-05-2006, 05:42 PM
Perhaps the creaters of the course thought you'd have your hands full with a polynomial program. :) Maybe it's a tradition, like "Hello, world!" and a calculator and hangman.

Never done a single one of those :p.
I was flipping through my Calculus II book today, and saw in like the 3rd to last section they said that computer scientist love polynomial functions because of their simplicity.
Yeah, they didn't look so simple in the back of a Calculus book.

webmaster
10-05-2006, 08:10 PM
Well, one thing that's nice about polynomials from a pedagogical perspective is that there are a lot of different ways to represent them (e.g., represent the exponents implicitly as positions in a list), so depending on what you have to do, they give you some design choices to think about.