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darsunt
09-28-2006, 07:45 PM
I was planning to download Red Hat Enterprise for my new computer, but I find that minimal cost is $164. The cost of Windows XP professional edition is $190

What gives? When did Red Hat get so expensive?

CornedBee
09-28-2006, 08:54 PM
It has always been. With the enterprise version comes a full support contract.

Get Fedora Core for a RedHat-associated free Linux distro.

Of course, this has nothing to do with Linux programming and should go to Tech or General Discussion.

maxorator
09-29-2006, 06:18 AM
So Linux has lost it's only advantage?
I thought it's free.

CornedBee
09-29-2006, 06:20 AM
Sure, Linux is free. The Red Hat Enterprise package is not. Get a different one.

maxorator
09-29-2006, 06:25 AM
I will. Soon I will format my HDD and squeeze Tux into it.

Perspective
09-29-2006, 08:46 AM
So Linux has lost it's only advantage?
I thought it's free.

Just for the record, I've always considered stability and security to advantages too.

darsunt
09-29-2006, 11:15 AM
I know you alway paid for redhat, but I think I remember a time when you could buy it for alot less than windows.

I really like working with Redhat Enterprise, but it still is a shock that it costs so much, especially since linux has such an open source reputation. Are we paying for things like Oracle support? I don't think Oracle has documentation for installing it on any other form of linux. I have done alot of work with Oracle on RedHat. I'm afraid installing and using it on a free version of linux would be without documentation support, which would mean a ton of trouble.

Mario F.
09-29-2006, 11:19 AM
You are paying for Red Hat support of their distribution. You are also paying for the manuals, box and CD. If you don't want to pay for that you can still download Red Hat for free.

laserlight
09-29-2006, 11:29 AM
I really like working with Redhat Enterprise, but it still is a shock that it costs so much, especially since linux has such an open source reputation.
Open source does not mean zero price.

lilrayray
09-29-2006, 01:47 PM
Why dont you look at other distos? There are plenty of good free ones. I would recomend Ubuntu. From my experience, it has the best driver support and is quite easy to use/install. In addition to that, it has a great community.

SMurf
09-29-2006, 02:18 PM
It's interesting to note that Windows' price does not include proper support. I wonder if it's always been like that.

darsunt
09-29-2006, 04:58 PM
So maybe redhat is a better deal after all.

But definately, if I want to use oracle, I'm stuck with Redhat and have to pay the $160. Right?
Even though oracle is powerful on Redhat, it is also really touchy if you don't stick exactly to the oracle documentation. Installing it on other distros would probably be a disaster?

Jaqui
10-12-2006, 09:14 AM
I really like working with Redhat Enterprise.

sick puppy, that's what you are ;)



, but it still is a shock that it costs so much, especially since linux has such an open source reputation. Are we paying for things like Oracle support? I don't think Oracle has documentation for installing it on any other form of linux. I have done alot of work with Oracle on RedHat. I'm afraid installing and using it on a free version of linux would be without documentation support, which would mean a ton of trouble.

got one word for you:

CentOS


the (unofficial) FREE open source version of Red Hat's Enterprise Linux.

Perspective
10-12-2006, 11:14 AM
got one word for you:

CentOS


the (unofficial) FREE open source version of Red Hat's Enterprise Linux.


Actually RHEL is free too, you can go to ftp.redhat.com and download all the source for RHEL. They just don't supply installable ISOs unless you sign up for a subscription (and compiling an OS is more complicated than one might think :) ). CentOS is a redistributer of RHEL that targets the small/medium business. They freely distribute their ISOs and offer support like the old red hat distro.

maxorator
10-12-2006, 01:45 PM
Open source does not mean zero price.
That means, if you are skilled enough to compile the source code, you'll get it free, otherwise you have to buy it. :D

Jaqui
10-13-2006, 02:33 AM
Perspective,
I know that RHEL is free for the source version. I also know that CentOS uses that to get thier own distro together, that was my point, CentOS is RHEL for all intents and purposes when it comes to 3rd party commercial software.
The 3rd party may not support CentOS officially, but they do not need to be told CentOS, you can tell them RHEL and get a real usefull response to issues with their product.