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siavoshkc
07-28-2006, 02:51 AM
My information about Linux is so limited. Can somebody lead me to a site about Linux versions, coparison, documentation, etc about it, please?

cboard_member
07-28-2006, 03:07 AM
www.linux.org
They have like a huge list...

siavoshkc
07-30-2006, 01:01 PM
Thanks for the link.

Ideswa
07-30-2006, 01:40 PM
SUSE linux 10.1 works fine for me, and you can keep windows and linux at the same time, with a boot loader.

siavoshkc
07-30-2006, 02:18 PM
What is the difference between Redhat and SuSE?

twomers
07-30-2006, 02:23 PM
Or you could take your own advice ( from here (http://cboard.cprogramming.com/showpost.php?p=577112&postcount=37)) and ... vola (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Linux). Or sometimes google has good things. Wow, first hit (http://www.google.co.uk/search?hl=en&q=linux&btnG=Google+Search&meta=)!!

Aran
07-30-2006, 03:32 PM
Does SuSE offer widescreen support for laptops? I've been considering dual-booting winxp and some distro on this laptop. It's got a 17" widescreen monitor that's very nice, and I don't want to use linux if it doesn't support 1440x900 and other like resolutions.

Perspective
07-30-2006, 03:45 PM
What is the difference between Redhat and SuSE?


Far too general a question to answer. The "free" redhat distro is Fedora Core. Its a nice easy distro to use.


And, yes.. you can use linux in a widescreen resolution.

FillYourBrain
07-30-2006, 03:47 PM
driver support (for laptops especially) is hit and miss sometimes. Fedora / Mandake / SuSE are pretty good best bets though.

joeprogrammer
07-30-2006, 04:25 PM
In my experience, the "big" distros, (Fedora, Mandrake, SuSE, Ubuntu), all run to slow on my machines. Not all that bad on a fast computer, but I like all the performance I can get. Here are the distros I would recommend for speed:
- Debian (http://www.debian.org)
- Slackware (http://www.slackware.com)
- Gentoo (http://www.gentoo.org)

FillYourBrain
07-30-2006, 04:27 PM
you just have to choose less of the fluff to get it to run better with the big distros. The big distos have the advantage of better hardware support though.

joeprogrammer
07-30-2006, 04:31 PM
you just have to choose less of the fluff to get it to run better with the big distros. The big distos have the advantage of better hardware support though.
Not always. One of the biggest factors in speed is that the big distros bloat their kernels to support all that hardware, when maybe you only need a fraction of it. The best thing to do on a huge kernel is to build your own. You'll notice performance gains imediately.

As for "better hardware support"? Very likely, but not always. For example, Red Hat has yet to add SATA support to their kernels. That renders Red Hat useless on the newer computers where SATA is becoming more popular. Or, you have to grab a precompiled kernel (with SATA support) before you burn the disc, and add it to the disk image.

FillYourBrain
07-30-2006, 04:36 PM
yeah, I am mostly shooting for the safest option since Aran was looking to put it on a laptop

valis
07-30-2006, 04:52 PM
If you search google for "linux", debian is the first free distro in the list.
I would recommend staying as far away from fedora as you can, I used it a number of months ago and was thoroughly dissatisfied. The nvidia driver wouldn't load so I went to recompile my kernel (which is unnecessarily complex compared to just untarring the thing) and found I needed a development version because the current one broke proprietary drivers (at least the development one worked). I also had trouble mixing apps I built from source with those installed by yum. My last frustration was the lack of some packages available via yum (although I installed it near it's release).

I second joeprogrammers selections except I would replace the word speed with goodness.

joeprogrammer
07-30-2006, 07:16 PM
The reason why these big distros are so popular is that they solve people's biggest fear: Hard to install. SuSE and Red Hat are almost easier than installing Windows XP, so it's an easy Linux experience. That's only if they support all your hardware, however. Once they start having hardware issues, then these big distros are no good.

In my opinion, Linux's biggest problem is adapting to hardware. The hardware makers don't have Linux in mind--it's not that Linux is a bad operating system, or that Linux Torvalds had a flaw in his code--it's because the hardware manufacturers only are thinking about Windows. So they write drivers for Windows, but nothing else.

These problems would go away if Linux were more popular than Windows. *Sigh*

MadCow257
07-30-2006, 07:55 PM
We took a poll here on favorite linux distro, I can't find it though...which one won?

Richie T
07-31-2006, 08:39 AM
Maybe this (http://cboard.cprogramming.com/showthread.php?t=38288&highlight=favorite+linux) poll?

Sorry the following is so long!!! The disc burning software referenced in the
following is CD Burner XP (http://www.cdburnerxp.se/), which I absolutely cannot recommend, just from my
experience.

>>SuSE and Red Hat are almost easier than installing Windows XP, so it's an
easy Linux experience. That's only if they support all your hardware, however.
Once they start having hardware issues, then these big distros are no good.

Too true - I'm a linux noob, having used it ever so slightly for my intro class in C
over a year ago (for some reason our lecturer just wanted us to use it). We
were shown how to log in, open a text editor and compile with gcc, and that
was pretty much it. We didn't have to use it after first year (just finished
second year now), but I figured that studying an engineering degree I might
want to have a bit more experience with UNIX/Linux systems, so I downloaded
SUSE 10.1 (we had used SUSE 8 or 9 in college, so I figured I'd stay in "familiar"
teritory).

After a 4 hour download of a 3.5 GB ISO, (broadband rocks :D ), I discovered
that I couldn't burn the ISO to DVD, I had to download a plugin for Windows
to write the disc. Eventually I had to download a burning suite with ISO
support. I burned the disc as instructed, and started my install. The boot froze
while loading the installation guide! Tried and retried again, but it kept on
freezing. Fearing that I had a faulty download, I got the checksums,
downloaded some checksummer recommended by opensuse.org, whose readme
was more than a little cryptic. Eventually I ran the checksums and they showed
up ok, so I figured it was a bad disc.

I burned a new disc, exactly as before, and retried. Got much further this time,
and actually completed a minimal install, and finally had linux! I tried it out for a
while, but I hadn't set up my broadband correctly, and I eventually restarted
and booted windows to read up on linux (how to set up broadband). When the
time came to restart, low and behold, it wouldn't read my video config - no UI
to fix it!

Went back to windows, read opensuse's forums and discovered that this was a
common enough problem, and read a number of solutions involving Sax2.
None of these worked, so I eventually read the man page for sax and found a
-c flag - which was described as sax attempting to find a working config on its
own - it worked!!!

Unfortunately, my user had somehow gotten screwed up, and I couldn't log in
normally! I decided to try and run the repair tools, but they kept on crashing,
so I eventually tried a reinstall - and that froze!!! Repeated the disc burning,
finally reinstalled, configured my install with the programs I wanted, and the
install failed on adobe acrobat. Restarted again, took acrobat off the list and
finally it got through, configured my broadband, had to sort out my display again
as before but I finally got it up and running!

It's running now on a generic video configuration because I haven't gotten
drivers for my graphics card yet, but that's because I'm afraid to do more
damage! I lost 3 days on that installation! That was about a month ago, and
I've barely touched it since, partly because of the comforts of my dad's laptop
(installed Linux on the home computer), but partly because I'm not feeling
up to it just yet, waiting for the battle wounds to heal.

From the number of catastrophes that happened, it probably sounds like I've
never had a serious install before, but I've been around windows more times
than I can count. I ran windows 98 virtually without AV and firewall for a good
while and kept it very clean, I think I only had 2 reinstalls over the course of
4 years, which IMO is not too shabby, but I've never had an experience like
Linux. Undoubtedly, a large part of the problem was the software I used to
burn the discs (unless maybe the discs themselves were dodgy, but they
were brand new), but it was still ridiculous.

Cheeze-It
07-31-2006, 08:43 AM
Aw, it's nice to see there's another person that has the same
moral objection to wordwrap that I do. Right on, Richie T. Right
on! Wordwrap is evil! Don't let nobody tell you no different,
comrade!

Richie T
07-31-2006, 09:00 AM
Thanks ethic - high praise!

I took up the format after seeing too many newbies posting code with what I
like to call "ultra comments" - somewhere in the region of 150 - 300 characters
in the same line. Then when they type their question, it just keeps on going and
going and going and going and................ and cos I'm on the laptop I hate
horizontal scrolling!

siavoshkc
07-31-2006, 11:32 AM
Only 22 voters in the poll, not enough to conclude anything.

psychopath
07-31-2006, 11:59 AM
...Linux Torvalds...

5 posts since, and no one has called him on this yet? :p

Wraithan
07-31-2006, 12:15 PM
One thing to keep in mind is a vast majority of linux users that I have met are elitists, bordering on being ..............s. I use linux as a hobbist, a bit at work, but since we write stuff in java/php/perl it all runs fine on windows/linux without any problems. A lot of them think and are willing to openly say that windows creates idiots. While they don't understand it is mostly the level of abstraction that windows allows, and most distros of linux can't come close to, that makes it the supirior product for the masses. And if Linux was in the majority, the viri/spyware would be written for it and suddenly a lot of these people would find their systems not as secure as they think it is.

http://www.ctrlaltdel-online.com/comic.php?d=20060513 replace mac with linux and add a little bit of security...

EDIT: Sorry, I was just coming from working on my new box for the last couple hours and finally got it working. I have found a lot of linux users to be elitist, and if you aren't part of their club they don't have time for you, but I also have found some who have really helped me and I did them an injustice with this message.

twomers
07-31-2006, 03:18 PM
RichieT<< I took up the format after seeing too many newbies posting code with what I
like to call "ultra comments" - somewhere in the region of 150 - 300 characters
in the same line.


// Hmmm ... well I agree with you Richie! It's sheer arrogance the way people do that isn't it? We have feelings too!!! Like, most of the time when they do it too, the code makes complete sense, and there is no need to comment it at all! I mean arrogance insofar as they thing they are the only ones who can understand it

however (sorry, this rant is to prove something), I think it's only really necessary to 'self wrap
your posts', if you are using the somewhat dodgy 'ultra comment library', and at the same
time, using code tags. If (and I hope I'm right), when I post this, you will see that the posts
before me and after me will be wrapped to the width of the screen, even though this post will
not be (so I'm a gonna self wrap)

valis
07-31-2006, 04:43 PM
I think no one called him because it's a single letter.

I am going to go make a new poll because that one is 3 years old and redhat is winning which isn't even free.

Perspective
07-31-2006, 05:20 PM
>redhat is winning which isn't even free.

umm, yes it is. you can go to ftp.redhat.com and download Red Hat Enterprise Linux as well as Fedora Core in their entirety.

valis
07-31-2006, 05:22 PM
Wow, I should probably work on not just making things up.
Why did fedora split off, I always thought it was because red hat became a thing that had to be purchased.

Perspective
07-31-2006, 06:34 PM
>Why did fedora split off

Because having one distro for enterprise businesses (who need stability) as well as home users (who want all the latest and greatest) became too dificult. So they made Fedora the distro that gets the newest of everything, and as software matures it gets pulled into RHEL. Each RHEL release is usually behind the Fedora release by one version.

Red Hat sells support for RHEL, fedora is entirely unsupported.

kermit
07-31-2006, 06:54 PM
One thing to keep in mind is a vast majority of linux users that I have met are elitists, bordering on being ..............s

Funny, I always thought that of Mac people.. ;)

It seems to be something that happens a lot though for people trying to learn Linux - I have often got the feeling that some people were born knowing all about Linux, and that is why they cannot understand why someone else might not have such an easy time with it. I have known a couple of people turned off by that sort of attitude. On the other hand, sometimes its just a whole lot of work to explain something - maybe that is why some people don't seem to want to help.

Wraithan
07-31-2006, 07:11 PM
Most of my questions were something like... hey I have been googling and searching forums for like 20 mins... anyone have a good guide for *****