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hdragon
05-10-2006, 12:30 PM
Well, i'll be in college this year and just wonder: what are the requirements for a programmer to work for a software or game company? People said you should know everything (networking, SQL database, graphic, ...) are these true?

Govtcheez
05-10-2006, 12:46 PM
100lb>Body weight>400lb

Beyond that, it's all semantics.

Rash
05-10-2006, 02:23 PM
If anybody has a body weight less than 100 lb and greater than 400 lb, I'd be very impressed.

SlyMaelstrom
05-10-2006, 02:41 PM
Check a website like monster.com. They'll have listings for entry level programming jobs.

For the lowest of low level, sometimes just a little programming experience is all you need. You'll get hired, they'll teach you what you need to know, and then you'll probably sit on a maintenance team with about 5 people that know better than you. From there, you pretty much look on and learn while you get paid.

For the most part, programming jobs can range anywhere between really calm and relaxing to moderately calm and relaxing. There are some jobs where they have big deadlines and are swamped with work. But in the places I've worked, I've found it's usually the operations side that stays overtime while the programmers cut out no later than 5:01 PM.

hdragon
05-11-2006, 09:18 AM
Do i have to pay on monster.com ?

Govtcheez
05-11-2006, 11:28 AM
Nope.

VirtualAce
05-11-2006, 12:31 PM
Well so far on Monster it seems most have abandoned C++ in favor of VB, C#, or Java and all it's associated acronyms.

Very depressing.

My favorite is when they say 5 to 10 years of experience developing in .NET when .NET hasn't been around that long....thank goodness.

Perspective
05-11-2006, 12:38 PM
Being a 403 lb programmer, i take offense to your criteria cheez, I'm suing you for descrimination :mad:

BobMcGee123
05-11-2006, 12:55 PM
Live in India.

VirtualAce
05-11-2006, 01:18 PM
Live in India.


:)

Actually there are a ton of jobs here in the U.S. However, only 372 out of 1000 on Monster were for C++, C, and/or MFC. Most were for VB with second being Java. Some of the requirements were ludicrous to say the least and if a person knew all of that, they could never pay them enough. You can't know and understand every technology and be an expert in every area so I think they are just trying to cover their bases.

As far as game programming over on www.gamasutra.com and www.gamedev.net most were in the United States and most, if not all, of the postings were at least attainable by most of us here who frequent the game programming forum.
They don't want linked list samples, DirectX wrappers, etc, etc. They are looking for hand-crafted engines that do more than just provide a front-end to DirectX/OpenGL. Personally I think a good front end is hard to develop in and of itself, but I do understand this does not really show what you can do. They are looking for rendering techniques like Perspective's implementation of Rottgers, your tank game complete with physics and the like, the UberTube samples that have been posted here, etc, etc. They want concrete examples that you understand the mechanics of game programming.

This is why we should all join forces (muahahahahaha) on the game programming board and create something together. We have enough talent to do so and with shaders and the like, we could produce something up to par with current production standards. It's not impossible. Most modern games are using shaders for lighting effects that are readily available in just about every ShaderX(#) book, Game Programming Gems and/or Graphics Gems books. Personally to me it is beginning to look like overkill on the shaders and most of them just simply annoy me so I turn them off.

Thread=hijacked.

:D

Govtcheez
05-11-2006, 01:20 PM
Being a 403 lb programmer, i take offense to your criteria cheez, I'm suing you for descrimination :mad:
Fatty.

SniperSAS
05-11-2006, 01:52 PM
^^ haha ^^

Also this is somewhat related:

a few people on another board i go to are saying that computer science majors will be oversaturated or are already

is this true

Perspective
05-11-2006, 02:01 PM
^^ haha ^^

Also this is somewhat related:

a few people on another board i go to are saying that computer science majors will be oversaturated or are already

is this true

This is a common misconception that makes me happy to be a com sci major. There was a US study done recently that shows the enrollment in com sci is down and the number of jobs is increasing. There will be a shortage of qualified programmers in the next 5 to 10 years.... and I'm gonna benifit :p

After graduating this year I received 2 job offers without even applying, I turned them both down for grad school.

and if your worried about "all the jobs being outsourced".. don't be. A recent interview with an IBM exec claims for every outsourced job there are 7 new jobs available. I dont know if i buy that exact stat but I believe there are many jobs for those who are qualified.

SniperSAS
05-11-2006, 02:02 PM
that's good, i got worried because i planned on doing CS

jverkoey
05-11-2006, 05:41 PM
Most important thing is to get experience under your belt. If you can't land a job, don't putz around: spend your free time learning, tinkering, and creating. Learn html or heck, learn php and make a website showing off your projects. If you can show that you are a competent programmer, you will get hired eventually.

major_small
05-11-2006, 05:52 PM
I agree with jverkoey... don't expect to get hired into a good job right out of school, especially if it's anything less than a master's.

SlyMaelstrom
05-11-2006, 06:25 PM
I agree that school and practice are key to success, I just don't want that misunderstood. Keep in mind that jverkoey said "eventually" which I'm sure implies that you're looking for a job almost "constantly". Don't look for a week, get nothing and decide two more years of school and you'll be ready.

Many of the higher level jobs want 3-5 years experience. That 3-5 years doesn't usually include tinkering around in your bedroom. If you can get a nice portfolio together for them from home, great, but they want to see field experience. If you want a programming job, look for it. Apply to anywhere you want to work and if you don't get it apply somewhere else. Keep working at getting a job just don't let it interfere with your schooling and on the side learning. Besides, as I said, if you land the right low level job, you'll learn quite a bit from the other programmers. It's an excellent learning experience and you get paid for it, too.