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View Full Version : VS.NET Meets The Standard



Witch_King
09-02-2001, 01:25 AM
It works perfectly fine. I'm reading a C++ book written by an author who only had access to a Unix OS. It is supposed to adhere to the standard (the book). Anyway I've been able to get all the programs thus far to run on VS.NET. I had a little trouble on VC++6 and had to do some work around but not to much. Wow, what a great help interface VS.NET has. It kicks on VC++6. I have both compilers on my OS because VS.NET is a beta, but this thing is fully operational. I might never have to get the final release.

mithrandir
09-02-2001, 01:51 AM
Well seeing as how it's only a beta version, there are probably some bugs in it you haven't yet found to be a problem. If they added Java support to .NET I might want to use it.

Esss
09-02-2001, 05:15 AM
> If they added Java support to .NET I might want to use it.

Rational will sell a Java compiler, and there will be a translator from Java to C# (JUMP).

nvoigt
09-02-2001, 05:59 AM
>I might never have to get the final release.

I hope the final release is way faster, or else I can
finish my project in VS6 while VS7 loads the default
template for new projects :p

Witch_King
09-02-2001, 06:10 AM
It takes about 15 seconds to register the main menu, than you have to wait another 15 seconds before it is fully operational. But after that, you have total power! And what an interface. The interfaces saves me a hell of a lot of time because I can navigate between open documents so proficiently. I also appreciate the sophisticated help system. There are a lot of features that I don't have a clue about yet. The IDE is loaded with features, including live features.

Dissata
09-02-2001, 10:22 AM
ok lets see


There are a lot of features that I don't have a clue about yet. The IDE is loaded with features, including live features.

It seems to me that a feature that you cannot use a don't use is not a good feature. I.e. If you'll never use it why pay for it?

Glad to hear you love .net but, com'on no one wants to hear about things that are awsome but they will never use!

Witch_King
09-02-2001, 10:34 AM
I'm testing the compiler out and learning how to use the hundreds of new features, waiting for more literature to surface. This is a beta. In 2002 the literature will be everywhere and I will be very proficient with VS.NET. Use your head.

gamegod3001
09-02-2001, 01:14 PM
because VS.NET is a beta, but this thing is fully operational. I might never have to get the final release.

I asked if I could get the beta and just keep it till I could use it, but someone said that after a while it would not work. So should I order it and have it, or not? (let me guess It's no longer available.)

Fool
09-02-2001, 02:18 PM
You can still get it in the latest issue of MSDN mag. Get it quick cause the new should be out soon.

-Fool

nvoigt
09-03-2001, 01:19 AM
I asked if I could get the beta and just keep it till I could use it, but someone said that after a while it would not work. So should I order it and have it, or not?


You can still get it. You can download it from MS, order a CD,
or look for any magazine that comes with VS .NET Beta.

It should not expire. However, the first Version of Beta 2 had
a bug in it which disabled it after a certain amount of days
like shareware. One day you would start it, and you are told
you exceeded the 30 days. What 30 days ? :p
But MS fixed that real quick. The latest version should not
be limited, and if you have a buggy one, go to Software->Add/Remove
in Windows, select MS.VS.NET and choose 'Check for Service
releases'. MS has one for download. Just select that, and it
will be downloaded and installed automatically.

gamegod3001
09-03-2001, 04:11 AM
Thanks.

Witch_King
09-03-2001, 04:17 AM
VS.NET Beta 2 works quite well. I have not noticed any bugs however I'm only working with Win32 console applications. It is a huge compiler. It would take me a year just to test everything out.

Esss
09-03-2001, 03:49 PM
> I have not noticed any bugs however I'm only working with Win32 console applications.

Well, when you use the rest of the system you'll find plenty of them. VS.NET is a nice environment and a great compiler - but I won't use it for production work until it's a lot more stable...

For instance, the resource editor is bug-ridden, it loads far too slowly, and creating non-UI .NET components kills it (try this: create a class library, derive a class from System.ComponentModel.Component, and compile it. Then add this component to the toolbox, and try to add it to a Windows Form). Not to mention that debugging a mixture of managed and unmanaged C++ is a nightmare, managed C++ classes mix very badly with unmanaged code (__pin is horrible) and the documentation has more holes in it than Swiss cheese.

Don't get me wrong; I want this compiler - but I want the final release of it.

gamegod3001
09-03-2001, 07:39 PM
I just thought of something How well does it work with diriectx since I may use that a lot.

Witch_King
09-04-2001, 09:26 AM
VS.NET meets the standard better than *NIX. I have been working from this *NIX book and it is easier to use VS.NET because more library functions are grouped under one library. I don't have to use as many headers as the book dictates. For the most part, all C libraries are under stdafx.h

The mother does take a while to load though.