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Magos
05-04-2005, 03:22 PM
Read the text below and count the number of F's in it (the letter F).



FINISHED FILES ARE THE RE
SULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTI
FIC STUDY COMBINED WITH
THE EXPERIENCE OF YEARS...



Ok, how many did you count? 3?
WRONG! Count again? It should be 6.

Reasoning further down:







































The brain cannot process "OF".

Mysterious, or what? Go back and look again!! Anyone who counts all 6 "F's" on the first go is a genius. Three is normal, four or more is quite rare.

Dante Shamest
05-04-2005, 03:34 PM
Thank you!!! I've been trying to find this quiz for a long time. I first saw it many years ago, and I've been unable to see it again until today. :)

The first time I took it, I indeed counted 3. Now I know better, so I spent a few more seconds finding the other 3.

Sang-drax
05-04-2005, 03:53 PM
Wow. Both me and my friend counted 3.

I don't know if I'd call a person who counts 6 a genious though. A 6-7 year old or a person who has just learned to read would probably count 6.

Perspective
05-04-2005, 04:00 PM
go away, you frighten me.

Thantos
05-04-2005, 05:19 PM
Interesting I got 3 and I had to read it a couple more time to see them all.

However I wouldn't really say it's an intelligence test. Anyone who's ever taken any type of speed reading course would probably only see 3. Reason being is that you learn to ignore words that don't matter. "OF" rarely matters.

MadCow257
05-04-2005, 05:26 PM
Does way the text wraps matter?

Micko
05-04-2005, 05:29 PM
I also counted 3 at first. It's wierd. :cool:

axon
05-04-2005, 05:58 PM
I've counted 6 the first time - but thats because someone told me of something similar some years ago in a psych class :)

Quantum1024
05-04-2005, 06:43 PM
I got 6 the first time but this test seams familiar so I've probably done it before. I wonder if it has something to do with "OF" being prenounced "OV".

Hunter2
05-04-2005, 06:45 PM
6 for me, because I went through it letter by letter instead of just reading it ;)

misplaced
05-04-2005, 06:57 PM
yea, i was about to say, there's a bug difference between reading it and scanning it...

i actually got 4 the first time...then somehow i got stuck on 5 even after knowing there was 6... i don't think getting 4 makes me a genius, just more astute ;)

Zach L.
05-04-2005, 07:00 PM
I got 6 the first time but this test seams familiar so I've probably done it before. I wonder if it has something to do with "OF" being prenounced "OV".

I have a feeling you hit it. The /f/ and /v/ are different phonemes in the English language, so just reading through, you'll "pronounce" the words in your mind, and only catch the three. I think Sang-drax has got it too. And someone who is not fluent in English is probably more likely to be paying attention to subtleties like that.

And yes, I only got 3.

elnerdo
05-04-2005, 07:34 PM
I've seen it before so I got 6.. ( I got 3 the first time )

But I'm gonna agree with the majority here, I don't think getting all 6 is genius.

Glirk Dient
05-04-2005, 07:50 PM
I got 3...so to regain my ego I decided to try it on a friend. She got 6 almost as soon as I sent it to her and she never saw it before...she thought it was a joke not a trick. I'm going to go sit in the corner now rocking back and forth while singing "Jesus Loves Me".

elnerdo
05-04-2005, 08:12 PM
Think of it this way, it can possibly show that you speak English more fluently than her.

gcn_zelda
05-04-2005, 09:27 PM
I counted 3 :(

People learn to read when they're 6-7?

I could speed read and comprehend by the time I was four...

major_small
05-04-2005, 09:50 PM
I counted 3 :(

People learn to read when they're 6-7?

I could speed read and comprehend by the time I was four...at least where I live kindergarden (the first real grade) begins at age 5, where you're taught learn the basics: the alphabet, colors, shapes, etc...

I counted 3 and I wasn't even reading it... I was scanning the letters only... I also think it has to do with the f/v thing, because I didn't even see the of's... even when I knew there was supposed to be six...

sand_man
05-04-2005, 11:33 PM
I counted 0 because I just can't read.

jverkoey
05-04-2005, 11:42 PM
That's sad.



Really sad.

prog-bman
05-05-2005, 02:18 AM
wait if you can't read how do you know what you are posting or what keys you are pressing ;)

Felix
05-05-2005, 02:44 AM
wait if you can't read how do you know what you are posting or what keys you are pressing ;)
It's the theory of probablity or whatever; put 1 million monkey behind typemachines and eventually they type out a shakespeare play. Same here.

nickname_changed
05-05-2005, 05:50 AM
I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
"zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
then
"one-zero one-one one-two"...
ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.

Can anyone from these countries or who speaks these languages confirm it?

Brain Cell
05-05-2005, 08:30 AM
i found 12 F's the first time. Am i abnormal?




nah , just 3.

Perspective
05-05-2005, 09:03 AM
i dont think its because of the phones. I counted three by scanning letters, not reading. I think it has something to do with all of the 'f's that you count come at the begging of a word or line. The 'f's in "of" come at the end of a word. Maybe that makes them more likely to be skipped? :dunno:

Welshy
05-05-2005, 10:03 AM
Those things are cool, it took me five or so attempts to count all six, lol

MadCow257
05-05-2005, 03:03 PM
i dont think its because of the phones. I counted three by scanning letters, not reading. I think it has something to do with all of the 'f's that you count come at the begging of a word or line. The 'f's in "of" come at the end of a word. Maybe that makes them more likely to be skipped? :dunno:
I agree, I went letter by letter and got three anyway.



Does way the text wraps matter?

Maragato
05-05-2005, 07:01 PM
I got five at first :p

DeepFyre
05-05-2005, 09:07 PM
well, it is on ebaumsworld.com. so how can it have anything to do with intelligence ;)

vasanth
05-06-2005, 04:35 AM
I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
"zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
then
"one-zero one-one one-two"...
ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.

Can anyone from these countries or who speaks these languages confirm it?


yep you are some what correct...

And for ppl who dont know me.. I left this board some time back.. Decided to come back now.. :)

axon
05-06-2005, 09:29 AM
yep you are some what correct...

And for ppl who dont know me.. I left this board some time back.. Decided to come back now.. :)

as rod predicted...or someone.

Thantos
05-06-2005, 12:29 PM
I'm pretty sure it was RoD
Edit:
Yep RoD http://cboard.cprogramming.com/showthread.php?p=419383#post419383

BTW Welcome back

Dante Shamest
05-06-2005, 04:31 PM
I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
"zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
then
"one-zero one-one one-two"...
ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.

Can anyone from these countries or who speaks these languages confirm it?

Not sure about Japanese, but what you say is true for Mandarin Chinese.

Hunter2
05-06-2005, 09:34 PM
I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
"zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
then
"one-zero one-one one-two"...
ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.Not sure about other dialects, but for Mandarin it goes:
Zero, One, Two, Three, Four, Five, Six, Seven, Eight, Nine
Ten, Ten-one, Ten-two, Ten-three, Ten-four, Ten-five, Ten-six, Ten-seven, Ten-eight, Ten-nine
Two-ten, Two-ten-one, Two-ten-two, Two-ten-three, etc...

treenef
05-07-2005, 01:22 PM
Yeah that's strange, even my program has difficulties.


#include <iostream>
#include <string>

using namespace std;

int main()
{

char array[120]={" FINISHED FILES ARE THE RESULT OF YEARS OF SCIENTIFIC STUDY COMBINED WITH THE EXPERIENCE OF YEARS..."};

int size=strlen(array);

int counter=-3;
for(int i=0 ; i <size; i++)
{
if(array[i]=='F')
{
counter++;
}
}
cout<<counter;
int stop;
cin>>stop;
}

paul_uk
05-07-2005, 02:38 PM
Aoccdrnig to rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a toatl mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit a porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

Queatrix
05-12-2005, 01:34 PM
I understood what you said MW_PAUL_UK. Scarry thing!

Lurker
05-12-2005, 04:31 PM
One reason besides the sound differences in of might be the fact that quite a few languages get by without a word filling the space of "of" at all - it is a case, like in Latin.


I heard children from asian countries (especially Japan) find the first few years at school very easy as far as maths goes because their counting system goes
"zero one two three four five six seven eight nine"
then
"one-zero one-one one-two"...
ie, they only have to remember the first 10 numbers, while us English speakers have the first 10, then we get into "teens", then "twenties", then "hundreds" etc etc.

Can anyone from these countries or who speaks these languages confirm it?


Languages have many different ways of counting numbers. Japanese's system is essentially 0-10, then 10+1, 10+2 etc. At 20, it is (2 x 10), (2 x 10 + 1), etc. This pattern is continued for a while. This is because Japanese borrowed from Chinese.

My favorite (and the most complex IMHO) is in Nimbia, a dialect of Gwandara spoken in Nigeria. It is a duodecimal system, so it goes from 1-12 and then gets more complex. It goes 12 + 1, 12 + 2, until 24, which is (12 x 2), then (12 x 2 + 1), etc. 70 is "gume biyar ni gwom" (12 x 5 + 10). This continues up to 144 ("wo"), or "12 squared".

Hindi is similar to our counting system up to 100. I don't want to spend time going into it now, but here's an example:

baaruh karor chauntees lakh chhuppun hazar saat sau nuwaasee
12 10000000 + 34 100000 + 56 1000 + 7 100 + 89

123456789

FlameZ
05-13-2005, 11:29 AM
Good God, I counted it 6! Yey!