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iain
02-19-2005, 12:34 PM
An industrial dye used in petrol has found its way into more than 350 foods from major brands and supermarket own brands. Sudan 1 is a carcinogenic, oops!

http://www.food.gov.uk/safereating/sudani/sudanlist

Salem
02-19-2005, 12:43 PM
Labels should be changed from "may contain nuts" to "maybe produced by nut-cases"

Brian
02-19-2005, 12:55 PM
Pot Noodle: Beef & Tomato Flavour

bollocks

iain
02-19-2005, 02:13 PM
i'm guessing that's a response to the (alleged) flavour, in which case you're damn right. no beef or tomato there. In fact pot noodle probably taste better with the dye.

According to the food standards agency website, the dye is used by some food plants in india to add to curry/chill powders but is banned in the EU.

Why would you put the same dye used in petrol and floor polish in food?

Salem
02-19-2005, 02:18 PM
Why is there even die in petrol?
I've no interest at all in the colour of petrol - I never sit and admire the wonderful hues it may have.

iain
02-19-2005, 02:33 PM
I expect it's for similar reasons that the artificial smell is added to gas (gas as in the gas pumped into homes, not petrol), so it can be noticed.

hk_mp5kpdw
02-19-2005, 02:39 PM
Why is there even die in petrol?
I've no interest at all in the colour of petrol - I never sit and admire the wonderful hues it may have.

In some areas of the US, farm owners get subsidized diesel fuel to run their tractors and stuff. This fuel is only suppossed to be used by farmers to run their equipment and is sold at a steep discount and it is dyed a different color to distinguish it from regular diesel fuel. Drivers of semis and unscrupulous truck companies will sometimes try to buy/steal this cheap fuel from farmers who often have hundreds of gallons of the stuff sitting in storage tanks on their farms. There is a huge fuel smuggling business in some areas. Police check the color of the fuel in the semi gas tanks to determine if it is illegally obtained fuel. If it is dyed fuel, you go to jail.

sean
02-19-2005, 02:45 PM
Why would you put the same dye used in petrol and floor polish in food?

Just because it's used in non-food substances doesn't necesarily mean it can't be used in food. Granted, said dye is actually carcinogenic, but still...

Brian
02-19-2005, 02:48 PM
i'm guessing that's a response to the (alleged) flavour, in which case you're damn right. no beef or tomato there. In fact pot noodle probably taste better with the dye.

According to the food standards agency website, the dye is used by some food plants in india to add to curry/chill powders but is banned in the EU.

Why would you put the same dye used in petrol and floor polish in food?

No it's a response to the fact that Beef and Tomato Pot Noodle is all I eat during long coding sessions.

kermit
02-19-2005, 02:56 PM
In some areas of the US, farm owners get subsidized diesel fuel to run their tractors and stuff. This fuel is only suppossed to be used by farmers to run their equipment and is sold at a steep discount and it is dyed a different color to distinguish it from regular diesel fuel. Drivers of semis and unscrupulous truck companies will sometimes try to buy/steal this cheap fuel from farmers who often have hundreds of gallons of the stuff sitting in storage tanks on their farms. There is a huge fuel smuggling business in some areas. Police check the color of the fuel in the semi gas tanks to determine if it is illegally obtained fuel. If it is dyed fuel, you go to jail.


Around here, construction companies, (or anybody really) are allowed to buy dyed fuel for their equipment and so on, but they are not allowed to run it in vehicles (trucks) on the road - the clear fuel costs more, as it is heavily taxed for road repairs. The interesting thing is that even if your tanks are clean of dyed fuel, they can still supposedly tell if you at one time ran it through the engine if they do a tear down and inspect certain parts of the engine.

Brian
02-19-2005, 03:02 PM
Around here, construction companies, (or anybody really) are allowed to buy dyed fuel for their equipment and so on, but they are not allowed to run it in vehicles (trucks) on the road - the clear fuel costs more, as it is heavily taxed for road repairs. The interesting thing is that even if your tanks are clean of dyed fuel, they can still supposedly tell if you at one time ran it through the engine if they do a tear down and inspect certain parts of the engine.

But how would they know you used it on the road?

kermit
02-19-2005, 04:23 PM
Good question - I guess there would need to be some other evidence to confirm whether or not the law had been broken.

RoD
02-19-2005, 04:40 PM
First they would need a very very good reason to tear the engine apart. Then they need to prove YOU did it. They take the pistons out because you can tell by the combustion colors on the piston, rings, and soemtimes the cylinder wall what fuels have been run in it.