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VirtualAce
12-27-2004, 03:31 PM
Ok so I send off my resume to a company who needs OO architects for certain projects. They mention C++ which, of course, is my primary language and so I think no biggie.

Now I get the questionaire back and they ask questions like whats the difference between an OO object vs. a class. I'm assuming they are talking about COM vs. a class - but to say that a class is not an OO object is a stretch in my mind.

Also stuff like knowing Java containers - but I'm not going for the Java stuff so of course I'm not going to know that. But if they want me to name some C++ STL containers no biggie.

I'm quite confused as to some of the other things like MVC or model view container, blah, blah, blah. Then they also ask what tools I'm familiar with as in debuggers and testing code. I dunno about you guys but I don't often use third party testing tools with my code. The ones that most IDE's provide suit my needs just fine. It's not that I couldn't figure out how to use the other ones, because it'd be a snap...but c'mon I don't know everything.

Perhaps companies need to clarify a bit more on what they really need instead of what they would like to have.

I can learn anything and if I don't know about something in computers it is not because of lack of understanding but lack of exposure.

Anyone else encounter this same stuff out there in the job market?



Perhaps I won't send it back, eh?

Prelude
12-27-2004, 03:39 PM
>whats the difference between an OO object vs. a class.
Strictly in C++ context, a class is a blueprint for an object, just like int is a blueprint for a variable of type int. I get the feeling the questions were worded poorly. ;)

>Anyone else encounter this same stuff out there in the job market?
Yes. The trick is to ask for everything at the offer of nothing so that they can get the most out of their money. If an applicant fits the requirements then that's a big win, but for the most part the company will "settle" for someone with fewer skills than they had "hoped for". :rolleyes:

jlou
12-27-2004, 03:43 PM
Perhaps I won't send it back, eh?Of course you send it back. Nobody knows everything, and they know that. As long as your resume and interview(s) show your ability to pick things up easily, it is ok to not know all the answers.

Darkness
12-27-2004, 04:33 PM
Best of luck to you.

Salem
12-28-2004, 01:30 AM
The person best suited for the job is typically the person who just left it :)
Unless they were sacked :D

Which brings up an important question, which is "Why do you have this job vacancy?"
It might reveal a company with morale and staff turnover problems.

nvoigt
12-28-2004, 05:06 AM
Companies are looking for people with 10 years experience, a university degree and maximum of 25 years old. You cannot get all three of them, but you can ask for it and take the candidate that fits best. It also helps weeding out candidates who are not that fit.

I guess the questions were just poorly worded :D