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View Full Version : VB .Net : is it worth the trouble?



Brain Cell
11-28-2004, 10:35 AM
Is this language worth spending time on? im having it in college but i don't know if i should sharpen my skills in it or just study it to pass the exam.

let me know what you guys think :)

nvoigt
11-28-2004, 02:07 PM
VB is the dark side. It's easy, it's tempting and it will lead to frustration, hate and anger. VB.NET is the same thing with a .NET marker tagged on. If you need a rapid development language, use C#. If you need power, use C++.

CornedBee
11-28-2004, 02:09 PM
I agree. C# and VB.Net offer you the same capabilities, but C# makes better use of them.

Brain Cell
11-28-2004, 02:19 PM
VB is the dark side. It's easy, it's tempting and it will lead to frustration, hate and anger. VB.NET is the same thing with a .NET marker tagged on. If you need a rapid development language, use C#. If you need power, use C++.
actually i hate it in every single way. The compiler just won't leave me alone and interrupts me in almost everyline.

Our college doesn't offer a C# course. But if C# is that good then maybe i take a course from somewhere else.

What im asking is , is it popular nowadays (talking about companies) and do you think it can really help in my career?

im planning on bieng a C\C++ and Java programmer so i don't know if Vb.Net will add anything to my career.

linuxdude
11-28-2004, 02:23 PM
<rant>Yeah. I have to take it right now also. I freakin' hate it. Every time you want to change something above or below the line you are in and didn't finish that line, a syntax error will come up. Then you were intending to go over after you hit up, and viola a freaking help tutorial thing comes up. If you mispell something it thinks you created a new variable without initializing it and(not only that) it automatically assignes it 0. Then your whole code doesn't work, instead of just telling you to declare you variables(I know I can change it but our teacher won't let us, and why should I have to type Option Explicit at the beginning of my code. I hate its indentions also. Rediculous. I never use that much space in my code.</rant>

spoon_
11-28-2004, 05:00 PM
actually i hate it in every single way. The compiler just won't leave me alone and interrupts me in almost everyline.


So you would rather wait until you hit compile and then go sifting through code to find the errors rather than having it pointed out to you as you type?

Odd fellow.

CornedBee
11-28-2004, 05:06 PM
So you would rather wait until you hit compile and then go sifting through code to find the errors rather than having it pointed out to you as you type?

Odd fellow.
Perhaps he'd like something sensible, like the C# IDE underlining whatever is wrong without further comment. The popups from VB made me crazy the short time I used it, too.

Brain Cell
11-28-2004, 05:12 PM
i actually don't like bieng notified of errors while im coding because sometimes i move between incomplete lines in C\C++ but when i do that in VB.NET it just won't leave me alone and the code will be either underlined (shows an error) or replaced by assumptions. I've been through every single thing linuxdude said :D

axon
11-28-2004, 05:26 PM
>>will be either underlined (shows an error) or replaced by assumptions<<

you could turn this feature off in properties

B0bDole
11-28-2004, 06:28 PM
Visual C++ .NEt !

Brain Cell
11-28-2004, 07:00 PM
>>will be either underlined (shows an error) or replaced by assumptions<<

you could turn this feature off in properties
never knew that , thanks. But the language is still ugly to me :)

i just wanna know if it really serves my career or not (i know it would help but i ment like would it make a big difference or not)

xddxogm3
11-28-2004, 07:06 PM
I think the only good reason for VB is for people that know nothing about programming to learn a basis of code. This basis provides them a stepping stone into the more complex languages or a way to stop themselves before they fail the harder languages. But beyond that, I feel VB is weak in power (compared to other languages), and not worth the M$ price tag. It also is not available on the *nix platform ( if it is I have been unable to find it).

alphaoide
11-28-2004, 08:35 PM
For your information, from software development magazine http://www.sdmagazine.com/documents/s=9411/sdm0411a/sdm0411a.html


The 2004 Software Development salary survey collected nearly 5,000 responses from staff and managers with titles ranging from programmer/analyst to chief architect and technical officer.....

Technology and Tools, 2000Ė2004

Over the last five years, some application trends have become obvious: Not surprisingly, given the buzz and simplicity of the technology, Web services have mushroomed from comprising 23% of respondentsí applications in 2002 to 31% in 2004. Despite a similar level of hype, application service providers havenít fared as well, rising from 17% in 2000 to 22% in 2004. The client/ server model has fallen from 74% in 2000 to 64% in 2004, and n-tier applications have dropped from 40% in 2000 to 24% in 2004. Real-time/embedded software has dropped slightly in popularity from 24% in 2000 to 20% this year, and its cousin, mobile and wireless software, has grown from 7% to 11% over the same period.

The most common languages or platforms? Oracle or other database, at 67%, Java at 64%, C++ at 63%, Perl or other scripting languages at 53%, .NET at 50%, C at 48%, J2EE at 40%, JavaBeans at 35%, C# at 34% and SOAP at 30%. At the opposite end of the spectrum, legacy technologies Cobol and Delphi have fallen steadily in popularity over the past five years: Their 2000 standings were 28% and 65%, respectively; they stand today at 20% and 8%. CORBA/COM/middleware has also dropped from 2000ís 36% to 2004ís 18%. For the first time, Java 2 Mobile Edition (J2ME) made the list at 7%.

B0bDole
11-28-2004, 09:08 PM
what does that^^ have to do with vb?

VirtualAce
11-28-2004, 09:25 PM
I've only coded in VB6 but several of my friends have coded in VB.NET. Essentially not much has changed. The one thing that still sticks out is that BASIC in its purest form was not designed to be a structured language. No amount of tweaking or hacking on MS's part to the core of BASIC or the IDE used to program it will ever change that fact.

Your class objects simply 'USE' controls, but they are really not actual controls. It would be like writing a class in C++ but not being able to have member variables or member functions. Useful up to a point. All you do is connect the visual elements to your code via ID's and then use those controls via methods and properties. Let's say you have a button. In MSVC you would probably derive from a button class and put relevant member variables in your derived class relative to the type of button. Of course this is just one example and there are a million different approaches, but let's just pretend for a moment.

In VB6 or VB in general you can still put a button on your form, but you cannot add methods to it or add properties. They have set methods and set properties. So what VB really comes down to is this:

1. Create GUI object in form editor and give it a name to ID it in code.
2. Use control 'similar' to class objects in C btnOk.Push(), text=btnOk.GetCaption()
3. Act on your actual data based on the status of the button.

As you can see your class that actually needs the button is so far removed from the actual object it's almost ridiculous to call it a class. It's more like you have two classes. One you can't touch and one you can.

Button --------------- Class that uses button to change it's data

So truly the button is merely an interface tool which is not all bad, but it becomes a pain in the arse eventually because everything is so disconnected. C++ is much more elegant and efficient.

I'm not saying VB is terrible because it serves its purpose, but it's still not really an object oriented language in my mind. More like an object-oriented interface or front-end that you can use to make changes to the actual data in the code.

alphaoide
11-28-2004, 09:32 PM
what does that^^ have to do with vb?
Hmmm....after second thought, my quote does not really show accurate info on popularity of programming languages out there. I was just trying to answer original poster's question


i don't know if Vb.Net will add anything to my career.

Brain Cell
11-30-2004, 10:12 AM
Well i didn't quite get what i was looking for , but thanks for participating guys :)

jwenting
12-01-2004, 06:07 AM
Wow, VB isn't even listed and Java is used by 139% (I know, I know, but you know how reporters think) of respondents.

CornedBee
12-01-2004, 07:31 AM
146%, if you include the J2ME count.

xddxogm3
12-01-2004, 10:02 AM
I believe it is only worth it if you are in a non-programming position.
this would probably be good if you were in a general non-code producing position where compiling and writing code is not your primary job objective. example would be if you had microsoft office and wanted to manipulate it using the macro editor. or if for some obscure reason they wanted you write a vb stand alone.
but if you are in the profession of coding, i do not believe it would be the most valuable tool in your tool box, but maybe there is some company that writes mainly in vb (maybe vbscript for the web.) ... this is just ramblings of an opinion from a student that has no real grasp of what is done in the real world.

major_small
12-01-2004, 12:25 PM
I've only coded in VB6 but several of my friends have coded in VB.NET. Essentially not much has changed.

I've coded in both, and while I only learned a little about VB.NET and alot less about VB6, they're syntax seems pretty different. other than that, like you pointed out they seem the same.

VB is nice to play with every once and a while and is good to learn if you want to interface with Access or Excel or something, but other than that, it's not really worth much IMO.

There are a good amount of companies looking for VB programmers, though.

I've learned C++,PHP,JAVA, and VB, and I would use them in that order. C++ and PHP both have completely different uses, JAVA is kinda messy and very slow IMO, and VB is just a windows thing.

bookworm
12-04-2004, 01:47 AM
VB.net has gone a step further than its parent, VB6 by becoming an object oriented language. It focusses on ease of use while allowing the power of OOP. However, obviously,not all powers could be handed over, and according to me , a c++ programmer will invariably find it irritating when he finds features like Operator Overloading and Vector programming missing. Also, stupid VB programmers who are not acquainted with OOP will find it mind-boggling. VB.net is meant only for intelligent VB6 programmers who have the capability of easy migration.

nickname_changed
12-04-2004, 10:12 AM
...In VB6 or VB in general you can still put a button on your form, but you cannot add methods to it or add properties. They have set methods and set properties. So what VB really comes down to is this....


Lets not confuse Visual Basic 6 with Visual Basic .NET.

VB.NET is object oriented, so to do what you are describing you would simply inherit from Button to create BubbasButton, and add your methods and properties to it.

To the OP: I would give it a shot. While actually knowing Visual Basic .NET in itself may not be very beneficial in the long run, you will learn a lot about the .NET framework, and once you know VB.NET picking up other .NET languages like C# and Managed C++ (as you already have a background in C languages) should take all of a few days.

A few of the opinions here seem to stem from experience with Visual Basic 6 or previous, and to those people I reccomend at least glancing over the features new to VB.NET. It is not just an upgrade to VB6 with a ".NET tag" on the end, but an entire rewrite of the language around the .NET framework.

Rez
12-04-2004, 10:27 AM
Bah! Y'all should study MS Quick Basic 1.1 instead. Or COBOL perhaps ;)