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RobR
05-23-2004, 11:48 AM
No prompting Kermi3 ;)

Thantos
05-23-2004, 11:54 AM
Long live the proper format of Month Day Year!

maes
05-23-2004, 12:07 PM
>>Month Day Year
where's the logic in that :p

day month year: now that's logic :D

kermi3
05-23-2004, 12:12 PM
I'm not prompting anyone, but I would like to encourage all the smart people here at cp.com to vote......



And maes is wrong.

Thantos
05-23-2004, 12:34 PM
Actually the best system in the world

YYYYMMDD.

DDMMYYYY makes as much sence as the 4 digit system: Last digit in the year followed by the day of that year.

Lurker
05-23-2004, 01:07 PM
Month day year! Month day year!

JaWiB
05-23-2004, 01:08 PM
I go with MMDDYYYY because it doesn't sound as good to say "The twenty-third of May" or "twenty-three May" as it does to say "May twenty-third" or "May twenty-three"

golfinguy4
05-23-2004, 01:34 PM
Month Day Year.

Biggest to smallest with the most static (year) moved to the end.

RobR
05-23-2004, 01:41 PM
Month Day Year.

Biggest to smallest with the most static (year) moved to the end.
:confused: Yay for logic! :D

Russell
05-23-2004, 01:44 PM
Numbers work from right to left, therefore logically it's: YYYYMMDD

whackaxe
05-23-2004, 02:02 PM
DDMMYYYY owns

first of all, when looking at the date you can track instantly day to day instead of having to look in the middle of the thing. same goes for YYYYMMDD. MMDDYY is also unlogical because it goes from 2nd biggest, 3rd biggest, biggest

gcn_zelda
05-23-2004, 02:57 PM
MLA is 23 May 2004, so that's what we have to use in school...


I use May 23, 2004...

eth0
05-23-2004, 03:39 PM
AFAIK, only Americans use MMDDYY and they didn't invent the English lanuage, so their way can't be correct. :)

Yoshi
05-23-2004, 03:48 PM
May 23, 2004
23 of May 2004
23-04-2003
2003-04-23

DavidP
05-23-2004, 04:37 PM
You are all wrong. Everyone knows the proper way is as such:

YMYDMYDY

Russell
05-23-2004, 06:56 PM
Is there a point to this poll anyway?

ZakkWylde969
05-23-2004, 06:59 PM
AFAIK, only Americans use MMDDYY and they didn't invent the English lanuage, so their way can't be correct. :)

I do believe the American English is a mixture of French and English.

Thantos
05-23-2004, 07:06 PM
And Greek, Latin, Russian, etc. Basically every culture has added to the language so its really hard to say it came from one or two spots.

Thantos
05-23-2004, 07:06 PM
Is there a point to this poll anyway?
Why does there have to be a point? This is the GD forum afterall.

Perspective
05-23-2004, 07:16 PM
AFAIK, only Americans use MMDDYY and they didn't invent the English lanuage, so their way can't be correct. :)

I see MMDDYY quite a bit in Canadian english and our english is even closer to english english then american english is.



english english english. (does it sound funny yet?)

DavidP
05-23-2004, 08:03 PM
I do believe the American English is a mixture of French and English.


French?!?!?! An insult!!!!


j/k :D

adrianxw
05-24-2004, 02:06 AM
Day-Month-Year always done it that way, and it's "Twenty Third" not "Twenty Three" - the twenty third day of the month, not the twenty three for heavens sake.

RobR
05-24-2004, 02:29 AM
>>You are all wrong. Everyone knows the proper way is as such:

>>YMYDMYDY



So, today is 20025044? Cool!

(BTW, you win Kermi3, you win. You're still wrong, but you win).

RobR
05-24-2004, 02:32 AM
Is there a point to this poll anyway?
Yep.

http://flashdaddee.com/forums/showthread.php?s=&threadid=9961

ober
05-24-2004, 05:50 AM
Heh. Americans 1. British 0.

whackaxe
05-24-2004, 09:39 AM
I do believe the American English is a mixture of French and English.


hrm.... how about... NO. i am fluent in both and can say that there are no signs of french in american english. american english is just a perversion of the queens english.



*exception made to dubya who asks "whats the french word for entrepreneur?"

DavidP
05-24-2004, 10:21 AM
Actually modern English does have a lot of French influence (sadly), but we can ignore that fact and say it is Latin influence instead, because French really comes from Latin.

Latin influence comes mainly from when the Romans ruled England.

French influence (which is just MORE Latin influence) comes from when Charlamagne came into the picture.

Germanic influence has been come in from several different tribes.

Then there are also still elements of old English and Gaelic of course.

Overall 70% of English is from Latin roots (that includes the French part). 30% is Germanic in nature. However, I have heard that even though English is 70% Latin/30% Germanic, most of the most commonly used words in English are from Germanic origins. That makes sense I think. Because if I was using the 70% Latin part of my vocabulary, instead of saying "That makes sense I think", I would have said, "That rejuvinates my cognitative partition." Or something weird like that....

RoD
05-24-2004, 10:23 AM
Influence /= mixture;

major_small
05-24-2004, 10:23 AM
DDMMYYYY
or
YYYYMMDD

just makes more sense...

maes
05-24-2004, 01:56 PM
That may change once Florida votes. :p :D
ROFL :D

This poll proves only one thing: there are to many damn Americans/Canedians here :p :p :p

j/k



BTW: Kermi, I'm never wrong :D.

UnregdRegd
05-24-2004, 02:24 PM
Well, I'd write it May 23, 2004, because I'm all about correct punctuation and such. I pronounce that, "This, the Twenty-Third Day in the Month of May, in the Year of the Lord, Two Thousand and Four." Every time. I wonder why some people avoid talking to me.