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axon
02-21-2004, 03:15 PM
I'm wondering if there is a command in unix that would chack if someone has copied a file from me. for example, if I had set my permissions so that everyone can read a particular file, and then someone actually coppied that file using cp command, to their own directory.

Is there any way I can check that they did it?

okinrus
02-21-2004, 06:14 PM
No, I think most unix kernels will only store the modification date and the last access date.

linuxdude
02-21-2004, 07:26 PM
It is on the tip of my tongue so you might have someone come up with an epiphany if I say it. I know that it is kept in a file somewhere. Either /etc/blah or /var/blah. I can't think of it. It tells you who logged in at what times and everything. I hate mind blocks. try using grep on those files?? If you are extremely lucky you have linux administration for dummies with you it is in there.

axon
02-21-2004, 10:42 PM
>>Either /etc/blah or /var/blah. I can't think of it. It tells you who
>>logged in at what times and everything. I hate mind blocks. try
>>using grep on those files?? If you are extremely lucky you have
>>linux administration for dummies with you it is in there

this is on a university network, so I don't have acces to /var or /etc....and grep doesn't do anything for me either....

any other suggestions?

-KEN-
02-22-2004, 01:29 AM
Originally posted by axon
>>Either /etc/blah or /var/blah. I can't think of it. It tells you who
>>logged in at what times and everything. I hate mind blocks. try
>>using grep on those files?? If you are extremely lucky you have
>>linux administration for dummies with you it is in there

this is on a university network, so I don't have acces to /var or /etc....and grep doesn't do anything for me either....

any other suggestions?

edit: :bonk: never mind. Answer being, no. Not possible.

okinrus
02-22-2004, 12:35 PM
Well, I'm certain that there are system adminstrator tools that will log which user executes, writes, and modifies certain files. But I don't think the non-root user can do that.