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Silvercord
11-08-2003, 12:56 AM
I'm looking into taking Electromechanical Engineering at theWentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. It's a five year degree (for a bachelors), here's the description:

http://www.wit.edu/prospective/academics/belm.html

It involves lots of math and heavily relates to computers, which is why I chose it.
Does anybody have any comments (your opinion of the course , personal experience, etc)

Perspective
11-08-2003, 03:16 PM
seems like an interesting degree. If your expecting to do alot of programming though, it will be mostley c and assembley. you wont get much high level API stuff like graphics and games (which your known to be interested in) unless you take some CS courses while your there.

overall, i say go for it. electrical and mechanical engineering degrees are two of the best for getting jobs in todays industry.

Silvercord
11-08-2003, 06:38 PM
The only thing I'm worried about is EM Eng being TOO difficult of a course. Just because I'm good at graphics programming doesn't mean I'll be a swan in everything (esp a degree that takes five years to get a bachelors). I'm hoping to continue working on my graphics projects and high level API stuff to get good enough to get a job as a software developer if I choose to go that route later in life, but i want to take something new in college.

ZerOrDie
11-09-2003, 02:33 PM
The only thing I'm worried about is EM Eng being TOO difficult of a course.


:cool: Engineering is pretty much the hardest degree... Expect to cross through hell in that first year. ;) At my university 800 students enter first year engineering(B+ average to get in first year in math, physics, english, chemistry, calculus) 400 make it to second year :eek: It is pretty competitive ;)

Silvercord
11-09-2003, 03:38 PM
Well, I'm applying to Wentworth and I'm checking the little box that says Electromechanical Engineering. I think i'm making a good choice by trying to take it.

ZerOrDie
11-09-2003, 08:35 PM
Are you sure that is a real engineering degree?

http://www.wit.edu/prospective/academics/overview.html



Civil Engineering Technology
Construction Engineering Technology
Architectural Engineering Technology
Mechanical Engineering Technology
Computer Engineering Technology
Electronic Engineering Technology


Because the above are definitely not engineering degrees... Note the "technology" in other words you are not a real engineer. Anyways be cautious about such things... You dont want to graduate and find out you dont have a degree in Engineering.

Even if that is a real Engineering degree i would be careful about going to a college where there is only one Engineering degree offered.

Silvercord
11-09-2003, 11:14 PM
Elec Mech is the only engineering degree offered at that school.

Silvercord
11-12-2003, 11:28 AM
evidently that's not true. You can take the fundamentals of engineering exam no matter what course you take, but electromechanical engineering is the only course where the force you to take it (along with civil engineering).

we called the school and you can still become a licensed engineering even if you take one of the 'technology' courses. So they are actually engineering degrees.

ober
11-12-2003, 02:09 PM
I call BS. You can't take a "technology degree" and all of a sudden call yourself an engineer.

Unless you're getting a Bachelor's of Science degree in some engineering major (mechanical, computer, electrical, etc.), then most places won't consider you an engineer.

And I think the test you're talking about is the Professional Engineers test... which is a freakin hard test and without a SOLID engineering background, you'd be hard pressed to pass it. BTW, if you're going into the computer field, you won't need a PE license/certificate in most cases. My professors and another PE that I know said that I shouldn't even bother going for my Masters (I'm a Computer Engineer) because it's pointless.

Do yourself a favor. Go for Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering. "Electromechanical" sounds like a EE/ME double major or like a robotics engineer which is pretty much suicide unless you're a genius.

Just my 2c.

ober
11-12-2003, 02:11 PM
>>Elec Mech is the only engineering degree offered at that school.

Also not a good sign. If you plan on being an engineer, you better pick a school that knows how to give you a solid engineering background, not just the specifics for your field. Find a school that offers a variety of engineering degrees and has been doing it for at least 10-15 years, preferrably longer.

joshdick
11-12-2003, 02:16 PM
If you're looking for a good engineering school, might I suggest Drexel University in Philadelphia? :p

ober
11-12-2003, 02:20 PM
Is that where you are going Josh?

joshdick
11-12-2003, 02:26 PM
Originally posted by ober5861
Is that where you are going Josh?

maybe... :p

axon
11-12-2003, 02:46 PM
I suggest looking into University of Illinois - Urbana...great engineering school and with costs in the lower half of the other big ten schools!

ober
11-12-2003, 02:51 PM
Originally posted by joshdick
maybe... :p

That's what I thought. Drexel is a good school, I almost considered it myself.

ober
11-12-2003, 02:52 PM
wait a second... I KNOW a kid that goes there... I don't know his last name, but when I figure it out, I'll PM you!

How f-ing weird would it be to know yet another cprogger indirectly.

Silvercord
11-12-2003, 07:48 PM
now wait a freaking second, we called the school, and told them to clear up this discrepancy for us. They said that the *only * difference between the 'tech' engineering degrees and what you guys call 'real engineering' degrees is that with the 'real engineering' degrees they force you to take the FE exam (the fundamentals of engineering exam) when you are done. They said you can still take the necessary tests to become a licensed engineer if you take, say, mechanical engineering technology.

EDIT:



I KNOW a kid that goes there... I don't know his last name, but when I figure it out, I'll PM you!

that would be awesome



My professors and another PE that I know said that I shouldn't even bother going for my Masters (I'm a Computer Engineer) because it's pointless.

Do yourself a favor. Go for Electrical Engineering or Computer Engineering. "Electromechanical" sounds like a EE/ME double major or like a robotics engineer which is pretty much suicide unless you're a genius.

Yeah, I'm applying to the university of maine's Computer Engineering program(which is completely legit, not the easiest to get into, and well known), but the thing is I actually like the looks of the electro mechanical engineering degree...I wish they had that at UMaine. and i think ur right it's a EE/ME double, hence the reason why they slap an extra year in there (takes five years for a bachelors).

ober what kind of work have you been doing with your degree (or are you still in school?)

joshdick
11-12-2003, 08:35 PM
Originally posted by Silvercord
I'm looking into taking Electromechanical Engineering at theWentworth Institute of Technology in Boston. It involves lots of math and heavily relates to computers, which is why I chose it.

If you want majors that involve lots of math and relate heavily to computers, why not just major in mathematics and computer science? That seems like the obvious solution to me. An engineering major is going to require you to take engineering classes that don't focus entirely on computers. If it's just computers that you're interested in, I'd suggest computer science or computer engineering.

Silvercord
11-12-2003, 09:11 PM
As I said, I'm applying for computer engineering at UMaine, and also RIT (I dont' think i mentioned RIT earlier).

electromechanical, for some reason, still seems extremely sexy to me. i just need to think and read up.

ober
11-13-2003, 07:10 AM
>>that would be awesome

umm... I was talking to Josh.

Also, I know we talked online last nite, but just for everyone else's information, I did NOT have to take a FE exam. Again, that is to become what is referred to as a PE, Professional Engineer, and that only allows you to sign off on inspections and do other very specific tasks. You don't HAVE to take that test to be an engineer. You HAVE to take it if you want to be a licensed engineer.

But if you just want to get the degree, you don't have to worry about it.

Silvercord
11-13-2003, 10:21 AM
oh i thought you were talking about wentworth for some reason

i'm wondering, what types of jobs can't you take if you aren't a licensed engineer

ober
11-13-2003, 11:40 AM
Anything that requires a PE... like some sort of higher management position that would require you to do inspections of workorders... or any kind of position that would require you to sign off on a design... maybe like a patent engineer.

And trust me, if you think you might want to get your PE certification at some point in life, you're better off taking it right after you get out of college. My former boss was a PE and he said it is a really hard test, and this guy was freakin smart. He said that if you wait to take it, you may not retain the knowledge necessary to pass it.

Silvercord
11-13-2003, 04:10 PM
so basically, it seems like not having the PE isn't a huge restriction, and subsequently isn't something I should put on the top of my list of things to worry about?

ober
11-14-2003, 07:09 AM
I would say not. Depends if you plan on reaching upper managment someday or not. And if so, you could always go back and take it anyways... figuring you can retain the info.

Cat
11-21-2003, 11:56 PM
The coolest engineering is biomedical engineering, of course :D

It's basically all engineering fields + medicine, and it has opportunities for any interest. Whether you like making new hydrogels, recording electrical impulses from turtle brains, working with stem cells or gene therapy, making electronics for a hospital environment, analyzing specimens with spectrophotometry, develpoing cutting edge surgical procedures, studying the mechanics of the human body, mathematically modelling neurons, or developing 2D imaging techniques, there is something for you in BME.

(Anyone guess what my major is?)

The one downside is that you probably need a master's degree, as the BS degree is often a little broad without great depth. At my college it takes only 1 additional year to get an MS (5 years total, start to finish).

Silvercord
11-22-2003, 09:57 PM
Right now I'm stuck between taking Math and Computer Science at the university of Maine, or taking electromechanical engineering at wentworth. We called the school and you can still get a license even if you are taking the 'technology' degree. They said the only difference between the 'technology' degrees and the 'real' engineering degrees is that the 'real' engineering degrees take an extra year to get a BS, and taking the licensing exam is part of the course. Everything actually seems legit at Wentworth, and when I visited I liked the surrounding area in Boston. Plus, I'm really interested in having a job that is something along the lines of machinery design.

Well yeah, I just thought I'd update you all.

the Wookie
11-25-2003, 04:39 PM
Originally posted by Silvercord
As I said, I'm applying for computer engineering at UMaine, and also RIT (I dont' think i mentioned RIT earlier).

electromechanical, for some reason, still seems extremely sexy to me. i just need to think and read up.

RIT..:o

i hate that place

JaWiB
11-25-2003, 05:37 PM
The coolest engineering is biomedical engineering, of course

It's basically all engineering fields + medicine, and it has opportunities for any interest. Whether you like making new hydrogels, recording electrical impulses from turtle brains, working with stem cells or gene therapy, making electronics for a hospital environment, analyzing specimens with spectrophotometry, develpoing cutting edge surgical procedures, studying the mechanics of the human body, mathematically modelling neurons, or developing 2D imaging techniques, there is something for you in BME.


Hey, that sounds really interesting! Is programming involved, by any chance? I'm just sort of reading any posts regarding college degrees...Hopefully I can make a list in my head to remember when I start looking at colleges the next two years :D

Cat
11-25-2003, 07:23 PM
JaWiB -- certainly, for a number of areas. My 2 minute brainstorm came up with:

1) Writing programs for medical devices (e.g. I saw an automatic biopsy machine with a custom-written OS and software, I've seen others running WinCE on a StrongARM, etc.)

2) Writing programs for image processing. X-rays, CAT scans, PET scans, etc. use some of the most sophisticated image processing in existence to construct useful images. Programs to interpret and display the data gathered by medical imaging are very important and a constantly-evolving field.

3) Firmware programming for almost any medical device. In fact, I was told by a recruiter from Medtronic that if I had firmware experience, I would be practically guaranteed a position with their company.

4) "Traditional" (desktop) software for hospitals, clinics, etc. which are moving towards less paper and more electronic recordskeeping.

5) Developing programs to allow people with disabilities to better operate a computer -- screen readers for the blind, etc.

6) Writing programs for research applications.

7) Writing device drivers for custom hardware for research & design purposes.

I'm sure there are many others. Personally, I've done most of my work-related programming at assembly level, but I have done WinCE programming, too.

Biomedical engineering is a massive field -- there are many, many subdisciplines, enough for anyone interested in medicine and engineering.

frenchfry164
11-25-2003, 11:00 PM
Speaking on the subject of computers, what do you guys think is the best college for someone majoring in Computer Science, and possibly minoring in Physics? Right now I want to go to Vanderbilt, if I can get enough scholarship money.

JaWiB
11-26-2003, 04:14 PM
I'm sure there are many others. Personally, I've done most of my work-related programming at assembly level, but I have done WinCE programming, too.

Biomedical engineering is a massive field -- there are many, many subdisciplines, enough for anyone interested in medicine and engineering.


Heh, that reminds me that I should try to learn assembly :D

Sounds like a great field, I'll have to wait and see if it still sounds good in a couple years :)

Cat
11-26-2003, 05:33 PM
The best thing about it (well, apart from it being f***ing AWESOME) is that it is relatively new, and that it has only tapped a small fraction of its potential. Recent advances -- like the computing explosion, sequencing the genome, the discovery of stem cells, advances in micromachining -- have only BEGUN to reshape the field. I work in some pretty cutting-edge research, and from my point of view, I see the biomedical field has a vast potential waiting for intelligent people to tap. There is tremendous interest, and tremendous money being pumped in, but I think it will take many decades before we'll even slow down.

In contrast, some areas (like mechanical engineering), although they have sizable areas left to be explored, are more robustly developed, offering fewer opportunities for growth. I think that the Biomedical engineering field has massive opportunity for the next 50 years or so, in that it should be quite easy for an intelligent and talented person to really do very well, much like the electrical engineering from the 1950s-2000s.

This is the right time for a LOT of major breakthroughs, so if you become the right person in the right place, you can do great things.