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DISGUISED
09-18-2003, 03:12 PM
Aoccdrnig to a rscheearch at Cmabrigde Uinervtisy, it deosn't mttaer in waht oredr the ltteers in a wrod are, the olny iprmoetnt tihng is taht the frist and lsat ltteer be at the rghit pclae. The rset can be a total mses and you can sitll raed it wouthit porbelm. Tihs is bcuseae the huamn mnid deos not raed ervey lteter by istlef, but the wrod as a wlohe.

Interesting :)

Jeremy G
09-18-2003, 03:18 PM
Actually, I was under the impression that they cant be in total chaos from the original lettering, some of the original shape must remain intact.

And I believe to be more precise, the brain not only doesn't read all the letters, it image match's with memory the shape of the word. Which is awsome when you look at image recognition with machines compared to human brain. We are thousands of times more sensitive.

As an example to the recognition of shape, try reading your first post on a huge font size, like 32. Its much different reading it small like 10 or 12. The difference in the time it takes to recognize is vast.

DISGUISED
09-18-2003, 03:29 PM
Originally posted by dbgt goten
Actually, I was under the impression that they cant be in total chaos from the original lettering, some of the original shape must remain intact.

And I believe to be more precise, the brain not only doesn't read all the letters, it image match's with memory the shape of the word. Which is awsome when you look at image recognition with machines compared to human brain. We are thousands of times more sensitive.

As an example to the recognition of shape, try reading your first post on a huge font size, like 32. Its much different reading it small like 10 or 12. The difference in the time it takes to recognize is vast.

Yeah I didn't read the actual research I just read an article about it and that's the example they gave. Good point on the font though.

Markallen85
09-18-2003, 03:36 PM
cool :)

I love random little thingies like this, might be interesting to do an experiment to see just how much we can still read after the words are randomly jumbled....

-mark

RoD
09-18-2003, 08:09 PM
Same reason you can read "leet" speak.

frenchfry164
09-18-2003, 08:48 PM
Wow! Taht is tlruy azmiang!

I could read what you said in your post without any hesitation at all, it was like they were perfectly written.

About the image matching thing, that is completely correct. I always aced my spelling classes back in elementary school because I would just remember what the word looked like, and I could just think of the looks of it and get it correct.

Yoshi
09-19-2003, 12:48 AM
this was found 2 weeks ago because someone in another forum posted there.

Ayanwy, siltl fnnuy tghuoh...

rick barclay
09-19-2003, 04:13 AM
I think that applies only to a person's native language.
My opinion is that anyone who reads English as a second language wouldn't fare too well understanding what this
thread is about. Suppose you read Spanish as a second language. Do you think you could read someone's scrambled epsnaol spelling as easily as you do English?

Sang-drax
09-19-2003, 01:34 PM
I hvae Eginlsh as my sconed lnguaage and I had no pelbomrs rediang the text. I have also made a ltitle prgroam in C++, wcihh has greeanted tihs text y'oure ranideg rihgt now.


#include <iostream>
#include <sstream>
#include <cstdlib>
#include <algorithm>

int main(int argv, char* argc[])
{
using namespace std;

string s;
cout << "Enter the text to be scrambled :";
getline(cin, s);

//Read the words
stringstream sin(s);
string word;
while (sin >> word)
{
int l = word.length()-2;
if (l>1)
for (int i=0;i<100;++i)
//Swap two random characters at the middle
// of the word
swap(word[1+rand()%l],word[1+rand()%l]);
cout << word << " ";
}
}

kermi3
09-19-2003, 01:46 PM
Actually we were talking about htis topic (not the article) today in my cognition class. It isn't really new news - it's been known for a while.

What's most importnatn is that the frist and last leters remain the same.

frenchfry164
09-19-2003, 03:05 PM
You spelled important without ending with a "t" and I had to read it lkie tiwce to fgruie it out.

Amazing. Simply Aamnzig.

ZakkWylde969
09-19-2003, 03:58 PM
Is there a reason I'm getting errors playing with that guys program? I got a couple that I fixed for MSVC++ and some i don't reconize.


(13) : error C2065: 'vector' : undeclared identifier
c:\documents and settings\user1\desktop\cool program\cpp1.cpp(13) : error C2275: 'string' : illegal use of this type as an expression
c:\program files\microsoft visual studio\vc98\include\xstring(612) : see declaration of 'string'
c:\documents and settings\user1\desktop\cool program\cpp1.cpp(13) : error C2065: 'words' : undeclared identifier
c:\documents and settings\user1\desktop\cool program\cpp1.cpp
Error executing cl.exe.
What does all that mean?

JaWiB
09-19-2003, 05:14 PM
#include <vector> and <string>

Sang-drax
09-19-2003, 05:37 PM
Remove the line with the error messages and you should be fine (i forgot to remove it). The code you see now should work (no extra headers needed; sstream defines string)
Strange that CodeWarrior compiled my erroneous code.

axon
09-19-2003, 07:35 PM
That is similar to how speed reading works....you can train your brain/eye to skip over "unimportant" parts of sentences.

axon

Shogun
09-20-2003, 01:23 AM
actoully it is the first 2 letters that has to be right it still has to look like the word and it most be longer then 4 letters.