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confuted
05-03-2003, 02:15 PM
Well, I'm signed up to take the AP Physics B test on the 12th. My school doesn't offer the class, and silly little me didn't realize that we learned approximately none of it in my Honors Physics class. I've been studying it like mad, but honestly, I don't know how much of it I will be able to do on the test. So, I'm wondering...has anyone here taken the test in prior years? How hard is it? I know you don't get a calculator for part of it...does that mean the multiple choice is easy? And does it also mean that the half where you get the formulas and a calculator is difficult? Any suggestions for me?

CheesyMoo
05-03-2003, 02:45 PM
This is unrelated but I'm taking the Computer Scienece test next Wednesday, I'm scared I'm gonna blow it... crap.

ingall
05-03-2003, 03:41 PM
I took physics last year, it's pretty hard. I ended up with a four, and i was happy with that.

ygfperson
05-03-2003, 03:55 PM
A 4's pretty good...

I've taken AP tests twice before (US Gov't, US History) and scored a 3 on each one. I'm taking an AP Calculus test this time around, and I'm hoping for 5. Calculus is my strong suit, unlike Social Studies.

My biggest worry is explaining why stuff works. It's sorta the same with all AP tests. That's where the tripwire is.

-KEN-
05-03-2003, 05:17 PM
Originally posted by CheesyMoo
This is unrelated but I'm taking the Computer Scienece test next Wednesday, I'm scared I'm gonna blow it... crap.

me too - check out apcentral.collegeboard.com and sign up as a teacher. You get past exam questions.

the Wookie
05-03-2003, 05:19 PM
yeah im taking US history, english, and computer science ab. on the a exam last year i got a 4, hopefully ill get about the same on the ab. im more worried about US

JaWiB
05-03-2003, 06:10 PM
i love listening to you guys talk about upcoming tests :)

fortunately im only a freshman in high school and my only test are all too easy...hehe

-KEN-
05-03-2003, 06:24 PM
Originally posted by JaWiB
i love listening to you guys talk about upcoming tests :)

fortunately im only a freshman in high school and my only test are all too easy...hehe

These are AP tests...not much to do with regular highschool. And I'm a sophomore taking AP compsci, so....

Dalren
05-03-2003, 07:11 PM
Already took the CS one, don't worry its not as bad as it seems. As for Physics, Im taking the C (calc bases rather than Algebra based) one on the 12th, from what I have seen from old exams, the multiple choice is not easy but very little calculation, mostly to see if you know the theory side of the course.

sean345
05-03-2003, 07:22 PM
I took physics B 2 years ago. Honors physics usually covers some, but not all topics covered on the AP test. The problems usually make sure you know and understand the concepts and equations.

Some keys for success are to answer every question on the free response. Even if you can't get the answer show what you are doing. Even if you are confused try writing a few sentences about what is happening and show that you understand something. This way you get some credit. All the points add up.

The multiple choice is not that easy. They don't let you use a calculator so all the numbers usually work out nicely. I would recommend that you go through and answer the one's you know for sure and then use what time is left for the rest.

You can usually buy an AP physic book that gives example problems. Those usually help prepare you for the test.

- Sean

ygfperson
05-03-2003, 08:00 PM
One other question... in the calculus multiple choice, do we have to show work?

CheesyMoo
05-03-2003, 08:44 PM
Does anyone have tips for the AP CS test? My middle school doesn't have a teacher, so I have to do it on my own.

-KEN-
05-03-2003, 09:47 PM
Originally posted by CheesyMoo
Does anyone have tips for the AP CS test? My middle school doesn't have a teacher, so I have to do it on my own.

Check my reply a bit of the way up the page.

CheesyMoo
05-03-2003, 09:56 PM
Originally posted by -KEN-
Check my reply a bit of the way up the page.

Sorry, I temporarilly forgot how to read.
Thanks.

confuted
05-03-2003, 10:10 PM
I registered on the collegeboard site as a teacher, and I found some sample questions...but I haven't been able to find any of the released exams. Are they there?

alpha
05-04-2003, 09:02 AM
I'm taking the Physics C exam, along with CS AB, Calc BC, US Govt, and AP Lit. As for the Physics one, as said before, the multiple choice is concepts. but there are some calculations, and some questions are, where did this come from? there were some questions on some practice tests that take 10 min to do. no one could figure them out, and when my teacher told us, we were like, those questions should be skipped. the overall test isn't so bad though. the free response, as said before, is kindof nice with points. write things down, i.e. conservation of momentum, conservation of energy, etc. etc. they'll usually give you a point for just saying Ei = Ef, or Pi = Pf, etc. depending how they decide to grade it.

best of luck with the exams for those taking them!

-KEN-
05-04-2003, 10:12 AM
Originally posted by blackrat364
I registered on the collegeboard site as a teacher, and I found some sample questions...but I haven't been able to find any of the released exams. Are they there?

Eh, I've forgotten my password there and don't want to re-register...search around a bit. The free-response questions are something like 50% of the test anyhow.

//edit: Search google for previous exam questions.

All of the multiple choice are God-awful annoying, we have tons of books with released previous exams in them in my class, and I hate them all. They're basically all designed so that you slip up somewhere stupid and fail.


EX:




void Trick(int &a, int &b)
{
a=5*b;
b=a+15;

cout<<a<<" "<<b<<endl;
}



"What is outputted to the screen with the call:

int t=3;
Trick(t, t);"

The "trick" being a and b now share the same memory, and anything done to one effects the other.


Also, they're reeeeaaaallll big on loops that look like they'd take years to trace, but really you notice they reset the counter every X amount of times so you only have to trace it a little bit of the way.

adc85
05-04-2003, 10:53 AM
Just out of curiosity, the function 'Trick(t, t)' would return 30 for each one, right?

CheesyMoo
05-04-2003, 11:19 AM
15 30 I think... I hope so otherwise I'm screwed Wednesday.

doubleanti
05-04-2003, 11:28 AM
For your B Physics exam, here's what I was tested on: optics, Newtonian mechanics, conservation of energy, I don't recall if there was any E&M (but at least conceptually it's based off mechanics learned earlier). And don't fret so much since, firstly, it can only buy you a quarter of college physics that they probably have a placement test for at your college of choice, and secondly it isn't that difficult. Later on the have calc-based physics, which is very annoying (I wish they would have the differential forms instead of the integral forms so it would match up with my D.E. class, but anyhow!). Also note that some APs won't give you any specific course credit, just elective credit. So far as AP Comp Sci, if you have your syntax straight and you are keen on flow control and passing data, you should be fine. Study nonetheless, as I too took these two tests without their classes (we didn't even have 'honors' physics, haha 'back in my day', makes me feel old). For your calc test, I don't think you need to show work if it's multiple choice but remember if you slip up it hurts you, so take that in mind. Generally if you have a good grasp of the material I say go ahead and answer every question, and if you got some wrong you'll get your 3, else get your 5.

Oh, and remember that to pass you only need to get half of the questions right. Colleges have their own placement tests usually, and even if they aren't publicized check the student affairs offices for your departments. And, when you do get to college, don't rely on the curves and you will do better in the long run. Don't ever rely on any curves, they make you lazy ultimately and you lose understanding of the material. Approach your college classes as if they were a set of two APs in high school and you'll find the exams up here much easier. Well enough of old me, haha, good luck and if you have any follow up questions ask!

Sincerely!
doubleanti, who's blowing up in engineering...

PS, just to give you guys an idea. The mean scores up here are usually in the 40 to 45 percentile for physics and engineering. Maths and humanities are usually not curved. In this past midterm in the ECE20 class (LC-2 ISAs / asm / C), the mean score was a 38 I believe, and many of them got in the 20's, 30's, and 40's. Lowest most pushed back bell-shape I've ever seen!

alpha
05-04-2003, 11:34 AM
Originally posted by CheesyMoo
15 30 I think... I hope so otherwise I'm screwed Wednesday. I think its 30 30

-KEN-
05-04-2003, 12:00 PM
Originally posted by CheesyMoo
15 30 I think... I hope so otherwise I'm screwed Wednesday.

You're screwed ;). Actually, just read up on references.

Do you know your AP classes? If not, give up all hope.

CheesyMoo
05-04-2003, 12:33 PM
Oh, I'm retarded, I didn't read the whole program, I thought it displayed them after each assignment. Whoops, I'll be more careful.

Yeah I don't know the subset that well, crap.