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View Full Version : What do these words have in common?



deltabird
03-03-2003, 08:08 PM
This is extra credit at my school: What do these words have in common?

DOOR, FRY, HORN, PASTRY, TOAST, WINDOW

Anybody know it?

Xei
03-03-2003, 09:03 PM
They are each names used to define an object.

napkin111
03-03-2003, 09:28 PM
Do you mean the objects the words represent or the words (letters) themselves?

//napKIN

Panopticon
03-03-2003, 10:16 PM
They are all words.

MrWizard
03-03-2003, 10:54 PM
They all contain at least one vowel.

alpha
03-03-2003, 11:00 PM
French.

French Door, French Fry, French Horn, French Pastry, French Toast, French Window.

Xei
03-03-2003, 11:14 PM
Originally posted by alpha
French.

French Door, French Fry, French Horn, French Pastry, French Toast, French Window.

Yup, the answer must be French! :P

novacain
03-04-2003, 01:27 AM
MrWizard>>They all contain at least one vowel.<<

what is the vowel in FRY?

Jeremy G
03-04-2003, 01:52 AM
y is known to be counter-changeable between a vowel and constanant.

Unregd
03-04-2003, 10:44 PM
Easy on the French! <sarcasm>You could just as easily say global-hegemonic door, global-hegemonic fry, global-hegemonic horn, global-hegemonic pastry,global-hegemonic toast, and global-hegemonic window and all in one breath (if you have the speed and lung capacity).</sarcasm>

dbgt goten wrote:


y is known the be counter-changeable between a vowel and constanant.


Letters are letters. Spoken sounds are consonants, vowels, and everything in between.

novacain
03-04-2003, 11:18 PM
>>y is known to be counter-changeable between a vowel and constanant.

When I was taught English in the dark ages, there were 5 vowels and 21 constants.

Y was a constant (even though in some cases it 'acted' as a vowel).

Shadow
03-05-2003, 12:32 AM
You sound the horn as your car is sliding through somebody's house window, and you take out the cupard full of pastries. You go through the wall into the next room where you go sliding door-first into a fireplace where you toast the car and fry like an egg.

adrianxw
03-05-2003, 02:59 AM
There is no doubting the nature of "Y" here, it is a vowel, the vowels in Danish are A, E, I, O, U, Y, , and . The other letters are consonants except W which does not appear in the Danish alphabet and C is a little dubious. My wife and I spent some time discussing it, and although school children are taught the alphabet with C, we do not believe that has always been the case.

thinking
03-05-2003, 01:32 PM
Door -> Window
Fry -> toast
Horn -> pastry (:confused:for a moment i thought i was onto something)

adrianxw
03-05-2003, 02:24 PM
We have a type of pastry which translated would be a "Cream Horn"...

salvelinus
03-05-2003, 02:41 PM
Originally posted by adrianxw
My wife and I spent some time discussing it, and although school children are taught the alphabet with C, we do not believe that has always been the case.
That is true, they used to be taught the alphabet with Fortran.

adrianxw
03-05-2003, 02:57 PM
Well of course, a line beginning with a "C" in Fortran is treated as a comment and would thus be ignored...

salvelinus
03-06-2003, 06:53 AM
Ouch! Actually, the C wouldn't be ignored, because otherwise the compiler wouldn't know it's a comment.
::grumble who'd of thunk someone here would know Fortran grumble::

no-one
03-06-2003, 12:03 PM
well being an american citizen and English being my native tounge, and english being one of the least taught subject i ever learned in the many schools i was in(many). I was taught, the English vowels were; A,E,I,O,U, sometimes Y, and in rarer cases W, though i have never seen that.

Silvercord
03-06-2003, 04:31 PM
they all take up pixels and bug me

LouDu
03-06-2003, 06:42 PM
they make me think so thereofre no :P

nut
03-07-2003, 05:52 PM
so ? ... what happened to the answer ? nobody came close to it ?

Govtcheez
03-07-2003, 06:28 PM
Illiterate retard says:
so ? ... what happened to the answer ? nobody came close to it ?

Three days ago, alpha said
French.
French Door, French Fry, French Horn, French Pastry, French Toast, French Window.

Commander
03-07-2003, 09:14 PM
y is not a vowel. can u say y without satying e....i thought so.

i rest my case




:confused: <thinking>what the hell did i just write t.... ::explosion::</thinking>

no-one
03-10-2003, 12:59 PM
... wtf did you just say?

well technically 'Y' works out to a vowel since "every word must contain a vowel", words like

by,
why,
cry,
dry,
ect...

use 'Y' as their vowel.

Govtcheez
03-10-2003, 01:02 PM
Please, please let this thread freaking die, guys. Debating about whether or not 'y' is a vowel is the most pathetic thing I've ever seen.

no-one
03-10-2003, 01:19 PM
trust me once you start, its a hell of a lot of fun!!

edit:: tr(y) it!! note the tr(y)!! HAHAH!!!

LouDu
03-10-2003, 02:02 PM
some mod can you please kill the thread please (A)(E)(I)(O)(U)