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Raoul_Duke
12-03-2002, 02:08 PM
Having had a look at the website and this board, i'm just a little bit confused as to what software i need to get started :confused:

I'm new to linux too (Red Hat 8) and so it's still a bit strange for me but i'm starting to feel at right at home :)

So yeah, my question is what do i need?

TIA :)

damonbrinkley
12-03-2002, 03:03 PM
To start off you just need gcc which is a C compiler and a text editor(assuming you want to do C programming). After that you'll eventually want to look into make and autoconf for building software.

What are you looking to do exactly?

Raoul_Duke
12-03-2002, 03:36 PM
Cool, i have GCC and a few text editors........as for what i'm looking to do.....not sure really, hoping to learn something new. I'm in the process of ditching Windoze and seriously getting into what a PC can do. Linux seems to have the perfect community for me :)

Is c++ good for working with sound :confused:

unixOZ
12-03-2002, 05:26 PM
The community is GREAT! Welcome hehehe

Lynux-Penguin
12-03-2002, 11:36 PM
U dont need anything
Linux (REDHAT)
comes with anything a programmer desires (usually)
however for Server APPS and stuph like that
visit http://www.linux.com/

Raoul_Duke
12-04-2002, 12:09 PM
What's a good text editor for c/c++ ??

I've got a few installed and was wondering what people thought was a good one for a n00b like me....Emacs or XEmacs.....or are they no good for C/C++? or should i stick with something very basic whilst i'm learning?

Any help/recommendations would be cool :)

unixOZ
12-04-2002, 04:26 PM
What's a good text editor for c/c++ ??


That question might generate lots of posts, my personal favouire is emacs, easy to use (read the HOWTO), quick, nice to program under X11 and console (for those elitee hackers) and very customizable. :D

Raoul_Duke
12-04-2002, 04:47 PM
Thank you......i'll start reading the howto :)

expect many more questions ;)

DarkViper
12-04-2002, 05:00 PM
ManDrake PowerPack Linux 9.0 comes with over 1000 useful programs, games, editors, programming tools, among other things too. thats the one im getting

so GCC is the best for Linux Programming eh? il hafta look into it!

Lynux-Penguin
12-05-2002, 01:50 AM
Originally posted by DarkViper

so GCC is the best for Linux Programming eh? il hafta look into it!

gcc is all there is
if there is another it probably RUNS through gcc
gcc-gnu c compiler
it is the DEFAULT compiler on all new Linux systems
back in the day(when I started)
we used cc
and that sucked
gcc is similar but much better

in fact on newer versions I have noticed that you never need to use #include
only for local headerfiles never standard ones...

Jaguar
12-05-2002, 12:44 PM
I prefer to Vim text editor but if you need GUI, I will recommend "anjuta" in GNOME, very nice.

DOlson
12-05-2002, 01:37 PM
I use Kate with the project plugin, then I just use a console pane at the bottom (F7, IIRC) to run my commands like make, make clean, etc.

I like it. I tried Anjuta, KDevelop, GVim for a while, Nedit, and emacs.

Kate works best for me. YMMV. Here's a screenshot of it:

http://aslan.no-ip.com/~dana/img/kate1.png

Oh, and btw, you can get different compilers for Linux. Gcc isn't the only one. Intel makes their own, and there are others. On top of that, if you wanna do RAD stuff, you can get Kylix 3, which does both C++ and Delphi now.

Raoul_Duke
12-05-2002, 01:43 PM
Cheers guys, plenty for me to look at :)

coreBuild
12-05-2002, 05:05 PM
Lynux Penguin, you really don't know anything do you?

kevinalm
12-05-2002, 11:40 PM
Originally posted by coreBuild
Lynux Penguin, you really don't know anything do you?

Sorry to have to tell you, but basically Lynux-Penguin is right. Gcc is the actual compiler linux uses. Everything else is either a plugin or alias to gcc or a front end ide that uses gcc as the compiling engine. Gcc is even the compiler that the linux os and kernel are compiled with.

Not sure about the #include thing though. Maybe that is what you mean?

TsunUntan
12-08-2002, 08:11 PM
What LynuxPenguin was refering to was the fact that on Linux systems in the /usr/include directory, the gcc compiler includes all the standard header files into the program by default so if you miss a header file or find an undeclared function gcc checks the directory for the header file you wished to include, otherwise you need to include it directly or tell gcc where it is ex:

gcc -lcrypt myencryption.c
or
#include <crypt.h>

should work, although im not sure, but I read this somewhere, let me know ok?

Hammer
12-08-2002, 08:22 PM
If you miss a header file, your compiler should warn you by saying something like:
>implicit declaration of function ...

Generally, it isn't good practive to work like this though.

kevinalm
12-09-2002, 12:04 AM
Originally posted by Hammer
If you miss a header file, your compiler should warn you by saying something like:
>implicit declaration of function ...

Generally, it isn't good practive to work like this though.

That's what I thought, but I doubted it would even compile. Just installed RH8.0 so I have had a chance to see if gcc 3 does. Doesn't seem like a real good idea though.

LynuxPenguin
12-09-2002, 01:11 AM
in my opnion you should always include the headers you want to use.

Less work for the compiler, though I could be wrong oh also
I ususally like to do
gcc -o myname -Wall myprog.c
so you can see a more definite error listing when it compiles

Lynux-Penguin
12-09-2002, 01:12 AM
oops forgot the - in my name