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RoD
10-07-2002, 01:29 PM
I have noticed alot of math topics recently, and being as i am not nearly the best in math it makes me wonder if going for my CS degree is going to work out, opinions?

BMJ
10-07-2002, 01:49 PM
Don't let math scare you...

To tell the truth, I started doing much better with math in parallel with programming; Both will teach you to think logically, and they can be analogous to each other.

When I began reading about C/C++ I was a pretty average/sub-average math student; Now, I've found that understanding math is no harder than understanding logic! Programming opened that door up for me! :) :D

Driveway
10-07-2002, 01:51 PM
I've never had any problems in math so I couldn't realate. ANyways... BMJ, what happend to your bannana?

BMJ
10-07-2002, 01:55 PM
Homer ate him :( :(

RoD
10-07-2002, 02:07 PM
damn that homer!

hmm, well i barely skated by in buisness math (percents and fractions **** me up).

I failed the math section for 12th grade state exam by like 6 points...

And i'll probably have to take trig and such in college. I am also worried because due to my lack of math skills i was never placed in algebra 1 or up and almost every college i want requires that...

Terrance11
10-07-2002, 02:10 PM
Originally posted by Ride -or- Die
damn that homer!

hmm, well i barely skated by in buisness math (percents and fractions **** me up).

I failed the math section for 12th grade state exam by like 6 points...

And i'll probably have to take trig and such in college. I am also worried because due to my lack of math skills i was never placed in algebra 1 or up and almost every college i want requires that...


If you don't like math, you're not going to like programming much either.

You don't need great math skills to program, just because you don't know calculus well doesn't mean you can't program. Just means you can't program using calculus in your algorithms.

But that's what programming is- building algorithms.

RoD
10-07-2002, 02:16 PM
See thats what gets me, i can program fine(most of the time), and i LOVE programming, but i h8 math. I like prog'n enough to bite the bullet and try and survive college, i just don't know if i will be able to hang with the college class.

Terrance1
10-07-2002, 02:16 PM
Originally posted by Terrance11
If you don't like math, you're not going to like programming much either.



Sorry, not to discourage you.

I shouldn't say that. But programming is based on building building algorithms.

I find learning programming very similar to learning math.

Terrance1
10-07-2002, 02:20 PM
Originally posted by Ride -or- Die
See thats what gets me, i can program fine(most of the time), and i LOVE programming, but i h8 math. I like prog'n enough to bite the bullet and try and survive college, i just don't know if i will be able to hang with the college class.

If you like programming you'll be fine. But to me, math and programming are very similar (learning it).

But you don't need to have excellent math skills to program. Arithmitic is needed, and maybe a decent uderstanding of algebra.

Sorry, I didn't mean to discourage you.

red_baron
10-07-2002, 02:21 PM
well programming has made math easier for me, i understand it better, and when i dont i just try to think of it as a program then i understand it. math isn't hard, if u can program well and can memorize the sets required to answer problems then you should be able to do fine.

note: i'm in grade 12 right now so i may not be the best person to give you advice; i usually get 80-90's in math, not bragging or anything just a fact.

Zewu
10-07-2002, 02:21 PM
You are born with a specific math potential

RoD
10-07-2002, 02:21 PM
I find learning programming very similar to learning math


As do i, computers just come natural to me.

ZerOrDie
10-07-2002, 04:18 PM
well if your not good at math and dont enjoy it i dont know why you would go for a CS degree

since you going to be doing a fair bit of calculus and linear algebra in the first year... you will do as many programming courses as math courses...

why not look into certifications or something of that nature?

im currently studying software engineering and have to say that if you dont want to do so many math courses it might be a better way to go...

BMJ
10-07-2002, 04:19 PM
Math didn't click with me until I was 18 :)

RoD
10-07-2002, 04:26 PM
Well i want to major in CS and get my degree, guess i'll just have to learn to get it huh.

TechWins
10-07-2002, 04:36 PM
Math has always come very easy to me and still does. That's why programming fits me perfectly. I like computer related stuff, and math is easy for me. Yay for me!:D

But if you enjoy programming, then you are going to have to take a lot of math courses for sure. You may or may not like these math courses. But who's to say that if you went for a different degree you wouldn't like other courses. I say take the degree that is going to relate to the job you wish to have.

RoD
10-07-2002, 04:44 PM
then CS degree it is!

Cshot
10-07-2002, 05:04 PM
The hardest part for you is probably having to finish all the prerequisite courses before you get on to more interesting CS courses. A lot these courses are designed to weed out the students early on.

Most programs require you to take Calculus, Linear Algebra, Statistics, Physics-Mechanics, Physics-Electricity, etc...

These courses are math intensive and the Physics courses require calculus. And these are only the lower division courses. CS courses such as Algorithms also require math for algorithm analysis.

You said you haven't taken Algebra so you still have a long ways to go. I'm not trying to discourage you but trying to get you to see the whole picture. It won't be easy but if you try hard enough you'll probably get through.

Good Luck!

RoD
10-07-2002, 05:08 PM
I can see i will be here for a looooooong time. Hah.

MethodMan
10-07-2002, 05:55 PM
Im currently in CS, some of the math related courses include, Calculus I and II, Discrete I and II, Linear Algebra, Physics, and Statistics. Many of the ones CShot mentioned. If you plan to minor in math, you have to take several more math courses.

Ive never loved math, but Im not that bad in it, Ive gotten by so far, its really not bad, some courses are actually fun, well depending on your prof.

Well Good Luck!

red_baron
10-07-2002, 05:57 PM
methodman u go to u of t?

RoD
10-07-2002, 06:10 PM
I don't know what i plan to minor in, all i know is i want to be a programmer and major in CS.

MethodMan
10-07-2002, 07:06 PM
Originally posted by red_baron
methodman u go to u of t?

No sir I dont, hehe.

Shadow12345
10-07-2002, 07:27 PM
Math and Programming

Unrelated. If you struggle greatly in math you might have some difficulty with programming, but being good at math is NOT prerequisite for programming. However, a BS in CS may not be what you want in terms of a major. A BA in CS has less difficult math and sciences whereas with a BS at most places you have to take linear algrebra, calc, physics, etc. with BA you have to take things like statistics, but you also have to have a minor in some other area i.e business. That is how it is at my state college. Basically a BS is required for engineering jobs, but a BA is just fine for most jobs. In fact the head of the department of computer science at the college I was looking at today said he's only heard of one person getting turned down because she had a BA instead of a BS (it was a department of defense type of job).

relfen
10-07-2002, 07:52 PM
Remember the point of college is not to go in educated...it's to come out educated. Take the classes, go to class, do the homework, use the resources available if needed(tutors, study labs, teacher, other students). Don't sell yourself short. You might get the right teacher and realize that it all just makes sense. And if you find out that math isn't your thing there are other majors available. You can always just take programming classes as electives and get a different degree and still go into programming as a career. My boss has a history degree and my co-worker has a degree in Physical Therapy and both work in the tech industry.

BMJ
10-07-2002, 09:02 PM
Mmmmmmmm.... I love Calculus, Trig, Linear Algebra, Physics.... *drool*

Captain Penguin
10-07-2002, 09:11 PM
I agree with most of what has been said. Math is a vital part of programming (linear algebra is the core of 3d graphics). Math helps with programming, programming helps with math. Being good at math can make programming much easier - I'm quite good at math and most programming ideas come easily to me (its the specifics of the language that bog me down)

In my programming class their are students who havn't passed algebra 1 and they are struggling through loops. I, on the other hand, am writing a matrix class to perform matrix manipulations such as Gaussian elimination and calculating Determinants and Inverses. I have previous programming experience, though, and am in a high-level math course (linear algebra). From my practice with matrix manipulation, writing a 3d engine on my own one day is entirely plausible. I'm not trying to brag - just giving an example of how math can accelerate your learning of programming.

Captain Penguin
10-07-2002, 09:14 PM
Originally posted by BMJ
Mmmmmmmm.... I love Calculus, Trig, Linear Algebra, Physics.... *drool*

I love concrete mathematics - just plain 'ol calculating and such. (calculus is the best course i've taken yet)

I tend to have trouble with problem solving, like in physics(but then again, my physics teacher was TERRIBLE), but I think programming is helping me out there.

Mister C
10-07-2002, 09:56 PM
Yep, if you want to get a CS degree you have to take calculus and other math. I ended up having 21 hours of undergrad math with my CS degree.

Shadow12345
10-08-2002, 01:03 PM
Yep, if you want to get a CS degree you have to take calculus and other math. I ended up having 21 hours of undergrad math with my CS degree.

NOTtrue!!! For a Bachelor's in computer science you do not necessarily need Calculus and Linear algrebra, but you may need a minor in business (or something else) depending what track you take. Unless you plan on working with something that absolutely needs that kind of math (an engineering job or 3d graphics) you do not need that kind of education. Most industry jobs only require the 'B' but do not distinguish between a BS and a BA (a BA is less math, but requires a minor).

And no one here can tell me I'm wrong because I spoke with the head of the Computer Science program at a university in my state just yesterday. I spoke with him for 40 minutes and I know fully all of the details between a BA and a BS. A BS grants CSAB accredidation (sp?) while a BA does not. What does that mean in terms of getting a job? Usually not much. The guy I spoke with yesterday said one person he's taught in his whole career was turned down from a department of defense job because she didn't have a BS in CS. He said that as far as he knows everyone else granted a BA has been able to find jobs in industry or elsewhere.

So in terms of being able to find a job a BA is just as good as a BS.

On the other hand, I do agree with the fact that Programming and Math help each other, but it is a bad idea to tie them together so strongly that if you fail in one you are somehow a failure at both. I personally HATE and SUCK at math, and, I'm a decent programmer. I admit I have gotten much better at math (my english skills have degraded though) since I started programming.

Cshot
10-08-2002, 01:30 PM
Oh another thing. If you're going to pursue a BA, the choice of schools is also important. Not all schools offer a BA in computer science, and there are also a few out there where the program differences is minimal. A BA may mean taking 1 less math course in some schools so you need to look into carefully.

RoD
10-08-2002, 01:46 PM
Well i am looking @

www.fgcu.edu

Shadow12345
10-08-2002, 02:00 PM
You don't even have to worry about the difference between a BS and BA. It seems they have basically combined the two together. I would be interested to see the course descriptions of the math required at Florida Gulf Coast University in the BS in CS degree.

That seems like a nice school.

RoD
10-08-2002, 02:05 PM
Yea i think it looks nice. I have been there a few times, i moved out of fort myers back to NJ while it was being built, the campus is rlly nice.

Shadow12345
10-08-2002, 02:35 PM
I hope all goes well if you attend that University. Most state schools are actually very nice. I've heard people say bad things about them but I think they are good. Today someone called me "narrow minded" because there is a local college I refuse to go to (I plan on going to RIT which is a tech university in New York or the University of Maine).

I don't have any muscles.

RoD
10-08-2002, 02:56 PM
I also refuse to go to our local, that doens't make us narrow minded, makes us more ambicious(sp)

red_baron
10-08-2002, 03:07 PM
Originally posted by MethodMan
No sir I dont, hehe.

heh then where do u go?

Bajanine
10-08-2002, 07:33 PM
I have always loved math. Math follows a given set of rules which makes it easy.

When learning a new topic like moments of inertia, I find it extremely helpfull to try writing a program to do it faster and easier. In the process you can even learn aspects that aren't specifically covered in your text book. I have even written simple programs on my programmable HP 42s, to make my monotonous calculations go faster.

red_baron
10-08-2002, 08:18 PM
Originally posted by Bajanine
I have always loved math. Math follows a given set of rules which makes it easy.

When learning a new topic like moments of inertia, I find it extremely helpfull to try writing a program to do it faster and easier. In the process you can even learn aspects that aren't specifically covered in your text book. I have even written simple programs on my programmable HP 42s, to make my monotonous calculations go faster.

umm math doesn't always have to follow a set of rules when you are trying to prove something there isn't a set 'rule' on how to do it, you have to be creative and think of a way to prove the problem