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RoD
09-17-2002, 04:24 AM
Scince i am going to go on to college to get my masters in CS and hopefully make a career out of it, should i learn Java? I am not sure what field i am going into CS for, i am really drawn to game design even though o/s always appealed to me too.

I know Visual Basic, HTML, and now i am learning c++. i don't want to backtrack on things like pascal, but it seems rational that the more i know the better off i will be.

Thoughts?

face_master
09-17-2002, 04:26 AM
JAVA IS EVIL!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!! AHHHHHHHHHHHHHHHH!!!!!!!!!

RoD
09-17-2002, 04:27 AM
after ir ead your last post i so saw that comeing :P

Troll_King
09-17-2002, 04:57 AM
You have a bachelors degree already, and your going for your masters? You should know about Java by now!

I think that a virtual machine is an important subject. I didn't read too much about them until recently. It appears that virtual machines are built right ontop of the computer hardware. They lie underneath the kernel. The virtual machine emulates an operating system and it does this by creating a virtual environment in user mode. The programmers user mode applications are interpreted and the kernel activity is simulated with a virtual monitor mode and a virtual user mode (but it is only virtual, it's all really user mode). It's a fascinating subject.

I think it's more important to study virtual machines, the actual systems. Research the history and trace it to Java.

face_master
09-17-2002, 05:36 AM
Java is interpreted, hence SLOWER THAN RUSKI (cprog user)!!

ober
09-17-2002, 06:47 AM
Originally posted by Troll_King
You have a bachelors degree already, and your going for your masters? You should know about Java by now!

I think that a virtual machine is an important subject. I didn't read too much about them until recently. It appears that virtual machines are built right ontop of the computer hardware. They lie underneath the kernel. The virtual machine emulates an operating system and it does this by creating a virtual environment in user mode. The programmers user mode applications are interpreted and the kernel activity is simulated with a virtual monitor mode and a virtual user mode (but it is only virtual, it's all really user mode). It's a fascinating subject.

I think it's more important to study virtual machines, the actual systems. Research the history and trace it to Java.

hey... genius... the kid isn't even out of high school yet...

anyways.... back on topic... Java is important yes, and most likely, you'll be forced to take it in college anyways... if you have a decent programming background, don't worry about it now... your Java courses in college will be a breeze.

[edit from ygfperson: deleted multiple threads]

RoD
09-24-2002, 05:51 PM
thnx ober

Shadow12345
09-24-2002, 06:20 PM
I think ober has a s-s-stuttering problem

glowstick
09-24-2002, 06:59 PM
Originally posted by Shadow12345
I think ober has a s-s-stuttering problem

t-t-today junia !!
[name the movie this came from and win a prize]

xlnk
09-24-2002, 08:08 PM
If you plan on taking the AP exam for Computer Science, which I plan on taking this year, junior. Starting next year it will be in Java. Just a thing to think about.

golfinguy4
09-24-2002, 08:45 PM
Glowstick, that's way to easy.

Billy Madison

RoD
09-25-2002, 03:55 AM
dammit i was bout to answer that too!

face_master
09-25-2002, 05:12 AM
same!!

glowstick
09-25-2002, 08:35 AM
Originally posted by golfinguy4
Glowstick, that's way to easy.

Billy Madison

u win. and the prize is ...
a free self-induced pat on the back !!
wow man !!
lol.

biosninja
09-25-2002, 08:56 AM
Okay, here's the deal. I personally prefer C++ 'cos it's a lot faster than Java. Java is also okay but it's realy slow because its designed to run on multiple os's. I've done my Computer Science course and found that C++ was more enjoyable due to the fact that it was more of an challenge for me whereas java is relatively more easy than C++. But whatever you do, DON'T UNDERESTIMATE JAVA!!!!

RoD
09-25-2002, 11:39 AM
My biggest concern is that i will get a good job(after college) with some big firm and hes going to say, "ok, but can u write java?"

i wanna be able to say YES but if he needs me for java not c++ then that job would be a waste of my time. But i want to know both so i'm flexible, so what i am thinking is Java a slow learn language or could i pick it up in a few days(or weeks) should i need it at a job?

Govtcheez
09-25-2002, 11:45 AM
It won't matter - since you're not even in college yet, if you just "pick up" some language, you're not going to remember it when you're done. You need to keep with it to remember syntax and other rules.

Shadow12345
09-25-2002, 12:53 PM
Java doesn't support multiple inheritance because it interferes with Java's 'ease of use'. But I LIKE multiple inheritance! :(

I am going to test out of the C++ book and my IST teacher says I can do Java...I'm also writing a game and she said I can do that for a grade (isn't that totally sweet?)

salvelinus
09-25-2002, 01:36 PM
If you know C++ Java won't be too hard to learn. Also, Java has a good chance of being a required course in college. Supposedly, more than half of colleges now require Java as the main language to learn, as opposed to C or C++.

RoD
09-25-2002, 03:35 PM
Colleges are enforcing it because (if i am correct) it replaced C++ as the language for the AP exam....

Well to "pick up a language" then forget it isn't rlly true in my case, i picked up vb and i can still do that if i have to, tho i strongly dislike it.

So basically i should be concerned with the language i want to live by (C++) and java is going to meet my life along the way.

[EMOBA]
09-25-2002, 04:16 PM
You're going to get hired because of your transcript. That's the only thing companies have to judge you by other than certifications (unless they test you, which a lot of them do).

I was hired for my co-op (coding in java) because of my transcript. I had a very limited knowledge of it (basic syntax)when I was hired becuase my school uses C++ as it's teaching language.

So don't worry about it so much, but the more you know the better...

edbowen
09-25-2002, 05:40 PM
A well rounded programmer should be familiar with the popular languages. If you know the principals of programming, you should be good in any language. You just need to learn the syntax to switch languages. The language you specilize in will depend on the project. Each language has it strengths and weaknesses, so one language will not work in every situation.

Fountain
10-06-2002, 02:03 PM
ALL the jobs in most UK computing mags/industry publications require good Java programmers.

I have watched the ads for a while now, and the money being offered for 'competent' Java programmers is double that of C++ programmers.

Just a thought.

red_baron
10-06-2002, 05:26 PM
heh i put c aside to learn java (and still am) though the oop part was a lil confusing at first, still trying to get use to incroporating it with my code, its weird, but i think java is easier in that a lot of classes and functions are already written for you so it takes a lot less time to program something in java then in c/c++.

Terrance
10-06-2002, 07:17 PM
Definately choose c++ over java, my teacher talked to us about this.

The java programming language is based on c++, and learning java is easier than learning c++.

Anyways, the business world is moving in the direction of c sharp(a better java- maybe??????), and regardless, c++ won't be an outdated programming language for at least 15-20 more years.

My class had a short discussion about this. But you'd be better off talking to someone who knows more about java.

But the main point our teacher made was that if we know c++, then we'll figure out java if we need to.

TechWins
10-06-2002, 09:50 PM
Can someone please explain this computer science AP exam? Do you need to take this to be accepted into a the CS filed at a university? What exactly is the content of the test? If I were to take this test when should I take it (I'm currently a Junior)?

zahid
10-06-2002, 09:58 PM
Definitely knowing Java will counted as plus.

But personally I don't like the slow thing. Actually people like speed.

Mister C
10-06-2002, 10:25 PM
The java programming language is based on c++, and learning java is easier than learning c++.


Terrance, not exactly. Both C++ and java are based on C. It also depends on who you talk to which is easier- I feel that somethings are easier in C++ while others things are easier in Java.



Can someone please explain this computer science AP exam? Do you need to take this to be accepted into a the CS filed at a university? What exactly is the content of the test? If I were to take this test when should I take it (I'm currently a Junior)?


TechWinds, the CS- AP Comp Science exam is given every May. There is the A and AB exams. You can successfully earn, usually scoring a 3, 4 or 5, college credit. Since you are a junior I would ask your high school couselor or AP coordinator about the exam. It is usually taken during your senior year.

I took APCS when I was in high school years ago. The language was Pascal

jawwadalam
10-06-2002, 10:26 PM
Originally posted by biosninja
Well, I would definately recomend C++. The reason is that C++ is just more challeging and the fact that you can do almst anything with it.:D

Java on the other hand....I'ts a nice language, easy to use. Everything is done for you. A window is created, the mouse is initialised ect ect... That is something that is always welcome. But then again, Visual C++ also does that.:D
What I had got the Response for the Same Question...

TechWins
10-06-2002, 10:37 PM
Thanks, Mister C, for the info.

jawwadalam
10-06-2002, 11:11 PM
I had the Same... Question...
So Check out this Thread Toooo
http://www.cprogramming.com/cboard/showthread.php?s=&threadid=25730

Captain
10-07-2002, 12:49 AM
Middleware is a platform for building solutions that support domain specific planning. Businesses are contracted the tools, by vendors.

On the other hand systems development requires understanding of platform implementation and the development of a knowledge base lead by practical experience.

If you are still confusing them, than how can you have any confidence in what you believe in.

Terrance1
10-07-2002, 02:05 PM
Originally posted by Mister C
Terrance, not exactly. Both C++ and java are based on C. It also depends on who you talk to which is easier- I feel that somethings are easier in C++ while others things are easier in Java.




Hello, I'm on my school's computer, and don't want to login.

Java is based on c++, and c++ is based on java.

Java is completely oop based, making it a lot less functional than c++ which acts as both an oop and top-down language.

OOP is slower than top down, so that's one disadvantage.

The world will never turn completely to java based programs, and c sharp is already taking over java.

So, stick with c++.

Terrance1
10-07-2002, 02:07 PM
Originally posted by Terrance1


Java is based on c++, and c++ is based on java.



I mean c++ is based on c.

We were just talking about this in class a few minutes ago.

Java overall is an easier language to learn than c++.

Captain
10-07-2002, 02:18 PM
I'd agree that C++ is a specialization of the ANSI C standard 1985. In terms of Java being related to C/C++, that is far less important than understanding the middleware technology on which Java is constructed, because there you will be able to differentiate them as system or solution based development languages.

RoD
10-07-2002, 02:35 PM
thnx for the rlly good info!

can someone elaborate, is java or c++ the AP exam now?

Captain
10-07-2002, 03:15 PM
No problem. I'm happy to provide help.

Mister C
10-07-2002, 09:59 PM
This year 02-03 the AP exam switches to Java. It had been in C++

Check out the College Board website.