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View Full Version : Yanks Vs the Aussies and Brits



mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:19 AM
As per the suggestion of my dear friend (well not really) RobS, I'm dedicating a new thread to why the American language is completely wrong, and the British and Australians speak and write proper English!

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:20 AM
Well, it could be worse - I could start typing in Ebonics.... (woo-hoo! 1100)

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:21 AM
Wassup wit dat?

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:23 AM
Sheet dawg, dis message biz-ord iz whack, yo!

SilentStrike
10-01-2001, 08:23 AM
English :(

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:24 AM
ROTF!

Yo thatz tricky gee, no wat I'm sayin'?

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:26 AM
I just realised then - the title of this thread may confuse some Americans. A Yank is an American (Aussie slang for Yankee).

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:26 AM
Hey, I never said the American language is completely wrong, there are parts of it I like and parts I don't, just like with the English language.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:27 AM
I'm just stirring mate, of course it isn't completley wrong :rolleyes:

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:28 AM
How can all you Brits and Aussies even understand each other with those damn accents? :p

> A Yank is an American (Aussie slang for Yankee).

Well, thanks for clearing that up for us ignorant fools. :p Anyways, this is one piece of info I'd be interested in knowing more about - where did the term "Yankee" come from?

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:29 AM
> mate

Mate is either something in chess or someone you have sex with :D

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:30 AM
Not really expecting you to know, but I heard that Pommie comes from a pronouncing POHMIE, prosiner of his/her majesty in exile, but if that's true why does it refer to us Brits.

I hate text message speak utterly (long live predictive typing), can we all unite to destroy ppl who type lik ths. thnks 4 ur hlp.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:30 AM
What cause we don't roll our R's?

I have no idea about where the term Yankee came from.

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:32 AM
> What cause we don't roll our R's?

What, and we do? I'm from the US, not France, for Chrissakes...

> destroy ppl who type lik ths. thnks 4 ur hlp.

15 th15 83773r?

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:34 AM
>>Not really expecting you to know, but I heard that Pommie comes from a pronouncing POHMIE, prosiner of his/her majesty in exile, but if that's true why does it refer to us Brits.

POHM or POHMS - Prisoners her majesty. Yep its true. It came about when the convicts were sent here to Australia. I guess because most were English, it became synonymous when refering English people.

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:34 AM
I've spoken to some americans who can't tell the difference between English and Australian accent its not that difficult.

How big is the regional variation of accents in the states and in Oz. I occasionally have trouble with yorkshire and newcastle type accents but not often, some people from liverpool just talk too damn fast, although they could all be on speed I suppose.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:35 AM
You do Govt. You roll your R's. "How arrr you going today?" Say it like that, and that's how you sound.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:37 AM
>>I've spoken to some americans who can't tell the difference between English and Australian accent its not that difficult.

Streuth!

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:37 AM
Not huge - I've never really had trouble understanding people from other regions of the country unless they mumble or smth...

> You do Govt. You roll your R's. "How arrr you going today?" Say it like that, and that's how you sound.

lol - that sounds like a pirate... :) (one thing I will concede that I like about British English is the word bloody... I've actually been using that in everyday speech lately - it's gotten me some weird looks)

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:38 AM
"How arrr you going today?"

That just looks/sounds cornish or west country to me.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:39 AM
Bloody hell mate, I think that's great!

Try saying streuth (strewth) when you feel like saying goddamn.

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:40 AM
Streuth? That's a new one on me...

Does that work in all cases? IE - would "Streuth it" be considered an acceptable substitution for goddamn it?

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:43 AM
When you go to lunch say "I'm off to get some tucker". When you go to fill up your car with gas say "I'm just going to pop down to the servo and get some petrol". When you are going to get a six-pack of beer cans. say "I'm gonna get some tinnies (tinease)

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:44 AM
THe english language does seem to have an overdose on swear words, most tv and films seem to get stuck on "phuq" or "$hit" pardon the spellings.

Just out of interest, where did you pick up bloody from as a word.
I might just die laughing if its from Spike or Giles in Buffy.

I've had the occasionaly strange look for "cor blimey gov'nor" as an expression of surprise.

Strewth's a great word, as is bollocks.

I wonder how much of this will get censored, after all we're only talking about language and not beinbg offensive.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:44 AM
Does that work in all cases? IE - would "Streuth it" be considered an acceptable substitution for goddamn it?

Say bugger (bugher) :)

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:46 AM
Bollocks - yeah that's a cool word.

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 08:47 AM
Actually, bloody was mostly picked up from this board (along with my newfound compulsion to insert u's into random wourds... still needs practice)... That was kinda the reason I started this discussion in the first place. I've never watched Buffy, actually - it never looked like any good to me.

> "I'm just going to pop down to the servo and get some petrol"

I retract anything good I've ever said about you, [stealth]... :p


> Bollocks - yeah that's a cool word.

On yet another tangent, I was in Best Buy yesterday (picked up the new D&D game and was supposed to get a free PH with it, but they were out), and noticed the CD "Never mind the bollocks, it's the sex pistols" for a reasonably cheap price... I've heard good things about this - anyone here have it?

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:48 AM
>>I retract anything good I've ever said about you, [stealth]...

Why? :confused: ;)

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:48 AM
I used it far too much over the summer, normally in reference to our abysmal Ashes performance.

mithrandir
10-01-2001, 08:49 AM
>>I used it far too much over the summer, normally in reference to our abysmal Ashes performance.

Too many bloody warm beers mate, that's England's problem!

RobS
10-01-2001, 08:57 AM
At least we have real beer, whole new kettle of fish, but I won't slag of Australian and american beers/lagers here, especially since I'm a whiskey person.

The Australian cricket team are, normally, in a league of their own, no-one comes close. It was real sporting of you to declare real early so we'd win one.

The problem is more, there's no money in it for the players or for investment in youth like there is in football and the state of the game is such that no-one really wants to play it, because all the victories against pakistan or however get dismissed as unimportant and then we get hammered by the best in the world and its front page news.

We we're doing quite well in test cricket up unitl the ashes.

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 09:00 AM
Is it true cricket matches can last days?

> fish

ghoti :p

RobS
10-01-2001, 09:03 AM
Real proper Test cricket matches, rather than Limited Overs matches, are scheduled for, depending on whether its county or international, 4 or 5 days. Of course the Aussies can normally finish of the Brits in 1 or 2.

How many minutes of play happen in an American Football match compared to the time between the start and finsh whistle.

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 09:10 AM
OK.. point taken... How much of that is actual play time?

RobS
10-01-2001, 09:16 AM
Assuming no delays for rain\bad weather.
Play starts at 10:00 and carries on until between 18:00 and 19:00 depending on over rate and light.
In this time there are three drinks breaks of 15 minutes I think and hour for lunch. Actual "play" play time in cricket is different since its more like baseball, in terms of the time inbetween deliveries being bowled.
Cricket is a really difficult game to explain, but it you watched for half an hour and/or palyed for an afternoon you'd be able to follow most of it easily and understand how it works.

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 09:23 AM
Hmm... I can't fathom playing a sport where you stop for lunch in the middle. Must not be too exhausting - most sports you'd die if you had to eat lunch and go right back to playing...

Drewpee
10-01-2001, 09:49 AM
Sorry, going on another tangent, Actually back to the original topic.
We all have heard of the element Aluminum...
from www.dictionary.com:

n. Symbol Al

spelling
aluminum

pronunciation:
a·lu·mi·num

Now why the heck do some Brits pronounce it:
a-lu-min-i-um ?

In the spelling, I only count one 'i'
Someone felt the urge to add yet another i and another syllable...

Can someone explain this to me?
Thanks

Unregistered
10-01-2001, 10:35 AM
We say it like that because that's how we spell it, you may have noticed that other words differ also...

Anyway, those australian and american accents sound as if they went all bent somewhere along the line...

Also, I don't know what's hard about understanding the Yorkshire accent, it ain't as bent as the liverpool, cockney, birmingham accents... see that ***** on neighbours(tv soap) - to australia from England, London, well she spoke like a ***** and sounded so ****ing wierd, what a discrace to the representation factor... Also those cockneys ........ me off, watching eastenders makes me cringe seeing that old fat little lady shout ****, why don't they just STFU, you know what they're like when they're saying mo or whatever. MAOE!

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 11:02 AM
> MAOE!

More Age of Empires?

Govtcheez
10-01-2001, 11:06 AM
From dictionary.com's entry for Yankee:
Word History: The origin of Yankee has been the subject of much debate, but the most likely source is the Dutch name Janke, meaning “little Jan” or “little John,” a nickname that dates back to the 1680s. Perhaps because it was used as the name of pirates, the name Yankee came to be used as a term of contempt. It was used this way in the 1750s by General James Wolfe, the British general who secured British domination of North America by defeating the French at Quebec. The name may have been applied to New Englanders as an extension of an original use referring to Dutch settlers living along the Hudson River. Whatever the reason, Yankee is first recorded in 1765 as a name for an inhabitant of New England. The first recorded use of the term by the British to refer to Americans in general appears in the 1780s, in a letter by Lord Horatio Nelson, no less. Around the same time it began to be abbreviated to Yank. During the American Revolution, American soldiers adopted this term of derision as a term of national pride. The derisive use nonetheless remained alive and even intensified in the South during the Civil War, when it referred not to all Americans but to those loyal to the Union. Now the term carries less emotion -- except of course for baseball fans.

-KEN-
10-01-2001, 02:49 PM
personally, I think we should all 5t4rt t41k1n6 11k3 th15...then everyone will think we're cool.

bloody hell! why do all of you buggers want to colour my ghoti like lager and stuff it in my flat?!

Ok, sorry, that just sounds funny to me...of course it sounds funny in english, but even funnier in ENGLISH (other, older, more annoying english).

About that u thing, I think me and govt contracted it from this board. is there some vaccine? I've been typing colour and such lately....

Unregistered
10-01-2001, 10:11 PM
> The american english is great. We took the sophsticated Briten english and make it meaner, cooler, and down with it. The amercan way.

nah, I think your just refering to ya accent...

doubleanti
10-01-2001, 10:22 PM
::having not read much of this thread's replies::

speaking of "YANK"... the YANK!___MER!!! has nothing to do with yanks... weirdo coincidence tho... and i don't think i've revealed it's meaning...

Koshare
10-01-2001, 10:35 PM
American has alot of spanish words in it...

America does not speak English anymore where I live. They canceled all of the english as a second language classes in school, and just throw the kids right into the classes. Its funny because all of the immagrated Mexican/Vietnamese get good grades even though I have never seen a single one of them turn in an assignment...


American is the language it is because there are many different types of people. When I used to live in the Navajo indian Reservation they had slang/customs which I caught on to very fast, like...


saying Shi instead of the other word....
nodding head instead of saying hello or waving
girls ask boys out rather than other way around
drinking lol

oh, and I can tell the difference from British/Aussie/Scotish/Irish
english...

mithrandir
10-02-2001, 02:46 AM
YANK!___MER!!!

YANKINFORMER

AMERICANINFORMER

Is that what it means da?

novacain
10-02-2001, 03:49 AM
>>Now why the heck do some Brits pronounce it:
a-lu-min-i-um ?

I understand it was a spelling mistake or other error on one of the first shipments to the US.

RobS
10-02-2001, 05:56 AM
"Now why the heck do some Brits pronounce it:
a-lu-min-i-um ? "

"I understand it was a spelling mistake or other error on one of the first shipments to the US."

That's odd, most Brits I know wonder why Americans pronounce it aluminum, since our dictionaries has the 'i' in it, properly dotted and everything.
I was told by a friend, who's usually reliable on such matters that the origial discoverer, apparantly American, when he first named it actually called it Aluminum but the rest of the scientific world tried to force it into fitting with more of the periodic table by chaging it to ium at the end but I have no idea how true this is. It could have just have been down to some really dodgy handwriting somewhere.

Oh yeah, sulphur, haemoglobin and foetus by the way in cae you wondered.

Pendragon
10-02-2001, 02:23 PM
Hmm.. the English language has 'evolved' somewhere along the lines. Globally and locally.

Some of the British dialects are near impossible to understand(eg. Newcastle). The Queen's english is nearly non-existent. Such a pity.

-Penny:)

Cruxus
10-02-2001, 02:25 PM
So, now we Americans don't speak English but, instead, some language called "American"? That's news to me; I guess I should get foreign language credits for my English classes then.


Koshare said:


American has alot of spanish words in it...

Maybe the form of American English spoken in your part of the country uses many Spanish words; but, around here, only a few Spanish words are used--and not all that frequently: patio, plaza, taco, burrito, tornado, tortilla, and a few more, mainly related to food.

A strange feature of many English and Australian dialects of English is the dropping of the terminating r. It can add to miscommunication.

[stealth] said:


You do Govt. You roll your R's. "How arrr you going today?" Say it like that, and that's how you sound.

Pronouncing final r's is not the same as rolling r's. A Mexican might roll his or her r's when speaking Spanish or even English, but most Americans don't.

I see many other Americans use the word bloody; it does add some color to speech, doesn't it?