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Klinerr1
07-25-2002, 03:40 PM
there are 3 main compilers i see used, dev c++ 4, borland(free version) and MSVC++ 6 enterprise. what do you use?


I use dev c++ 4

harry_p
07-25-2002, 04:16 PM
MSVC++ 6 Standard

Fountain
07-25-2002, 04:19 PM
hmm borland 5.5 prof . yes thats it

Klinerr1
07-25-2002, 08:04 PM
for the rest of the people that said other say what compiler you use
------

im trying to get msvc++6 enterprise but i can find ti in stores and my parents dont wanna got it on a e-shop because they are very catious about giving away their credit card number

whistlenm1
07-25-2002, 08:08 PM
A dev-C++ user here (mainly) :rolleyes:

Dual-Catfish
07-25-2002, 09:39 PM
im trying to get msvc++6 enterprise but i can find ti in stores and my parents dont wanna got it on a e-shop because they are very catious about giving away their credit card number

Why do you need the enterprise edition? I doubt your parents want to fork out ~$1000 for a compiler. Besides, I doubt you even know the differences between the Standard and Enterprise editions.

Unreg1stered
07-25-2002, 09:48 PM
Dev C++, and G++ (Cygwin).

black
07-25-2002, 10:03 PM
Dev-C++:)

Klinerr1
07-25-2002, 10:44 PM
1. wut is g++?
2. whats the difference between standard and enterprise, isnt standard not useful if u plan on selling things you create? i heard i should get enterprise thats all. and i was planning to pay for it myself. Yes i have like a thousand dollars, i do like little things for people and get money like making layouts for their sites etc.

MrWizard
07-26-2002, 04:33 AM
MS VC++ 6.0 Professional edition here.

onurak
07-26-2002, 05:02 AM
g++ stands for GNU c++ compiler it is free compiler that comes with all the linux distirubution(red hat suse bla bla bla).

Monster
07-26-2002, 05:26 AM
Visual C++ 6.0 Professional and Borland C++ 6.0 Enterprise

Ruski
07-26-2002, 06:27 AM
I use Dev-C++ ... but not 4 :) 5!

Shiro
07-26-2002, 12:10 PM
DJGPP, Borland C++Builder (free version), Visual C++ 6.0.

Klinerr1
07-26-2002, 01:34 PM
dev c+ 5 is not recomended to use until they complete it, ive gotten uncalled compiler errors with it because of its beta. im gettgin 5 when its done, unless i buy vc++ 6 by hen

moonwalker
07-27-2002, 05:24 AM
I heard that borland c++ 6 builder (personal) is 69 bucks.
is it worth it ?

Is there anything that I can't do with BC++ 5.5 (free version) that
I can do with the 69 buck personal edition, besides the IDE ?

dead_cell
07-27-2002, 09:18 AM
I've been using DevC++4 for the last while, but lately I went out and bought VC++.NET - I'm still getting used to the millions of tabs and options Microsoft has so thankfully thrown into there... But overall the switch wasn't all that horrific.

Klinerr1
07-27-2002, 10:33 AM
whats thwe difference in the difference msvc++ 6 versions?

Ruski
07-27-2002, 10:49 AM
Originally posted by Klinerr1
dev c+ 5 is not recomended to use until they complete it, ive gotten uncalled compiler errors with it because of its beta. im gettgin 5 when its done, unless i buy vc++ 6 by hen
I dont have any problems so far :)

Powerfull Army
07-27-2002, 05:56 PM
Speaking of compilers,i tried alot and am having trouble geting 1 for true-dos(16 bit apps).Can someone tell me what(in the free section of borland compilers) i need to download to get a 16-bit compiler?I have bcc32 but what do you use for 16-bit and how do you get it?

frenchfry164
07-27-2002, 06:22 PM
yes, dev-c++ USED to not be recommended, BUT they just came out with a new version of it a few weeks ago. I downloaded it to see how buggy it was (I tried the old version of 5, and it wouldn't even compile anything without throwing 5 errors at me, and then one of those This program needs to terminate messages), and I was shocked, because it works very well with WinXP and it works fine. It also has a bunch of new features, like the source explorer (it's a tab on the left part that has all your source files) that lets you go through and look at your parts of the source like functions, classes, structures, etc. and it lists all the variables, member functions, and all that right there. If you click on one of the variables it'll take you to where it is implemented (also where it is declared if you right click and click "Goto declaration") and it works VERY well with Allegro and Multisource Projects.

Powerfull Army
07-27-2002, 09:30 PM
I tried that,it doesnt compile 16-bit.Anyway I'd much rather have the Borland 16-bit compiler,how do you get it?Anyone?

Klinerr1
07-28-2002, 12:50 AM
Originally posted by frenchfry164
yes, dev-c++ USED to not be recommended, BUT they just came out with a new version of it a few weeks ago. I downloaded it to see how buggy it was (I tried the old version of 5, and it wouldn't even compile anything without throwing 5 errors at me, and then one of those This program needs to terminate messages), and I was shocked, because it works very well with WinXP and it works fine. It also has a bunch of new features, like the source explorer (it's a tab on the left part that has all your source files) that lets you go through and look at your parts of the source like functions, classes, structures, etc. and it lists all the variables, member functions, and all that right there. If you click on one of the variables it'll take you to where it is implemented (also where it is declared if you right click and click "Goto declaration") and it works VERY well with Allegro and Multisource Projects.
really, kool.. but im just gonna stick with 4 untill 5 is completed.

squireBOB
07-28-2002, 03:45 AM
I WWF myway around Borland CBuilder 5 Pro. I tried VC++6 ENT but I never seemed to win a match with it.:D

Ruski
07-28-2002, 05:29 AM
Originally posted by Klinerr1

really, kool.. but im just gonna stick with 4 untill 5 is completed.
I've got the 5 and it's really cool :)

toaster
08-05-2002, 12:39 PM
to that someone who wanted MSDEV 6.0 Enterprise Edition:

why? std and pro editions are just missing a few buttons, that's all there is for the extra 100(s) bucks difference.

if you're desperate, you can get it for a discount price. :)
however, you must be a HS/College/University student.

anyway, you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI.

don't just stick to MS, try other flavors.
each one has their own advantages and disadvantages.
if you like creating DOS based programs, try using Borland or other dos compilers like DJGPP.

the link:
http://efollett.journeyed.com/cgi-bin/sgin0101.exe?TRAN85=Y&UID=2002080200532540&GEN0=&GEN2=&GEN7=&GEN5=&GEN8=WWW&GEN9=index2.htm&T1=61781723&FNM=00&UREQA=2&UREQB=1&UREQC=3&UREQD=4

as for security, I had no problems so far. by hey, still costly (~$400). if you have previous versions, you can upgrade rather.

moi
08-05-2002, 01:09 PM
Originally posted by Klinerr1
there are 3 main compilers i see used, dev c++ 4, borland(free version) and MSVC++ 6 enterprise. what do you use?


I use dev c++ 4

leave it to klinerr1 to leave out gcc, which is without contest as popular as or more popular than every compiler on that list :rolleyes:

jdinger
08-05-2002, 02:17 PM
Originally posted by toaster
anyway, you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI.

and you read this where?

Unregistered
08-05-2002, 04:55 PM
Originally posted by toaster

anyway, you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI.


dood, just about anything can compile for win32 :rolleyes:

toaster
08-05-2002, 05:25 PM
one word makes a big difference:

"anyway, you can ONLY ..."

this applies for the executables unless you are doing html, scripts, SQL, and the other stuff so java is the most portable in MSVS unlike the others. If your just working with MSVC++ 6.0 EE, you're only able to create Win apps (that means only for Windows and no DOS, Linux, and the other OSes unless they create Windows emulation which Linux did started a while back).

toaster
08-05-2002, 05:28 PM
Originally posted by jdinger


and you read this where?

if you open the "&New..." dialog under the "&File" menu, it shows for itself.

moi
08-05-2002, 05:56 PM
Originally posted by toaster
one word makes a big difference:

"anyway, you can ONLY ..."

this applies for the executables unless you are doing html, scripts, SQL, and the other stuff so java is the most portable in MSVS unlike the others. If your just working with MSVC++ 6.0 EE, you're only able to create Win apps (that means only for Windows and no DOS, Linux, and the other OSes unless they create Windows emulation which Linux did started a while back).

very poor english. i just went over this one using The Elements of Style to guide me

"anyway, you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI."

the object is missing, so insert it in implied position to gain meaning

"anyway, you can only create (applications) for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI."

which indicates the false statement that people thought you said. to say what you meant to say:

"anyway, <with MSDEV> you can only create (applications) for the Win32 compatible platforms just FYI."

notice that with msdev has been moved to modify correctly. note that (applications) was just inserted to help make analyzing easier, it is not of course nessecary:

"anyway, <with MSDEV> you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms just FYI."

now i don't expect anyone to type perfect english on the internet, but don't get all ........y when someone fails to comprehend your malformed sentences. :rolleyes:

toaster
08-05-2002, 06:19 PM
[raises an eye brow]

I wasn't "........y" about their response(s). I just felt that I needed to clarify myself. Thank you for your grammar corrections.

It is also interesting how the following sentence is similar to my commented sentence yet more understandable [to me]:

"Anyway, you can only work for specific companies with your limited abilities."
versus
"anyway, you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI."

I had also shown the sentence to some of my friends and they understood it perfectly fine.

moi
08-05-2002, 06:20 PM
Originally posted by toaster
[raises an eye brow]

I wasn't "........y" about their response(s). I just felt that I needed to clarify myself. Thank you for your grammar corrections.

It is also interesting how the following sentence is similar to my commented sentence yet more understandable [to me]:

"Anyway, you can only work for specific companies with your limited abilities."
versus
"anyway, you can only create for the Win32 compatible platforms with MSDEV just FYI."

no time or desire to argue english. buy the elements of style. it's a great book.

toaster
08-05-2002, 06:24 PM
All right. I'll get myself a copy.

say, why don't you search up all my posts and send me a list of my grammatical and spelling errors. That might help my english skills.

moi
08-05-2002, 06:28 PM
its about as boring as books get, but it is considered the standard for english language composition.

Ruski
08-06-2002, 06:55 AM
By The Way: http://www.compilers.net/Dir/Free/Compilers/CCpp.htm

mithrandir
08-06-2002, 08:22 AM
I use MSVC++ 6.0 Enterprise, and DJGPP.

Ruski
08-09-2002, 07:25 AM
I used to use Dev-C++ but mooved onto Visual C++ as soon as I discovered that dev was freaked :)

onurak
08-09-2002, 10:45 AM
in my opinion there aren't 3 big compilers do not forget gcc

Ruski
08-09-2002, 10:53 AM
Isnt GCC Unix??

Unreg1stered
08-09-2002, 02:22 PM
Originally posted by Ruski
Isnt GCC Unix??

The original version is for UNIX, but there's a ported version for Windows as well.

MethodMan
08-09-2002, 02:48 PM
I use borland, with notepad for my C++, I dont like visual c++.

tgm
08-09-2002, 03:56 PM
Dev-C++ is not a compiler. It is an IDE (integrated development environment). The compiler that comes packaged with Dev-C++ (if you download it that way) is the Windows port of GCC (http://gcc.gnu.org/) known as MinGW (http://www.mingw.org/).

I use VC++ (mostly for the IDE) on Windows but doing my compiling with MinGW on Windows and GCC on Linux. For my Linux IDE I use Anjuta (http://anjuta.sourceforge.net/).

civix
08-09-2002, 05:18 PM
Microsoft Visual C++ Professional Edition...:D

Fountain
08-09-2002, 05:36 PM
my borland was nice 'n' cheap as a student licensed copy...cant really complain about it!

Works for me..

Cruxus
08-09-2002, 08:32 PM
I marked other.

My main compiler is Microsoft Visual C++ 6.0, Standard Edition, which was only $109 compared to the $2,000 or whatever the Enterprise Edition costed at the time. A second compiler I have is Borland (Inprise) C++Builder 5.0, Standard. On my Linux computer, I use GCC 2.95.2 (g++), which was what came with my distribution.

Cruxus
08-09-2002, 08:54 PM
Klinerr1, I'm not sure about the new Microsoft Visual C++ .NET (7.0), but the differences between the various editions of Visual C++ 6.0 were kind of like this:

Introductory Edition: Like Standard Edition, but you cannot legally redistribute your executables. A dialogue box pops up, even in console (text-only) applications.

Standard Edition: You can legally redistribute your executables! Here's the big one: The compiler does not do optimizations--not for file size, not for run-time speed. Microsoft's documentation says that the MFC library cannot be statically linked into your executable, but it seems the static libraries are included. InstallShield Express (an installer-creation utiltity) is not included. The full MSDN Library help and documentation system is included.

Professional Edition: The compiler does optimize. InstallShield Express is included. If you're not a C++ newbie, you'd probably want this edition.

Enterprise Edition: An SQL Server, Developer Edition, with debugger is included. A few other tools that would probably only be of use if you develop in-house, distributed applications for businesses is included. In my opinion, you'd be wasting a lot of money paying for features you'd probably never use.

I'm not sure about version 7.0 (.NET), but I would think the differences between the editions would be similar. (It was only Visual C++ 5.0, Learning/Standard Edition, that would not let you redistribute the executables. Microsoft changed back to let you in version 6.0.)

Yaj
08-09-2002, 10:37 PM
I use DevC++ but I don't know what version i'm using.

d00b
08-09-2002, 10:44 PM
I'm an MSVC++ 6 Enterprise user.... I got a 60% student discount though, and next season when I buy MSCV++.NET I'll get another big discount, which is the only reason I can afford it! :)