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moemen ahmed
07-02-2002, 09:33 PM
I was wondering if anyone here knows ASM and if so, do u think its usefull to learn it(even if its just for helping understanding archetecure of computers

golfinguy4
07-02-2002, 09:45 PM
I know a little. It is good to know how the computer functions. This allows you to write more effecient code.

Being able to write in it gives you a great deal of power because if you need speed, you can tell the computer exactly what to do.

Hillbillie
07-02-2002, 11:59 PM
>o u think its usefull to learn it<

I think it's very useful to learn assembly. You understand exactly what is happening, and this enables you to write better code even in HLLs.

Check out the assembly forum over at FD. They'll (Compuboy and Garfield) have you a guru in a week. :D

borko_b
07-03-2002, 02:29 AM
I know some ASM but it is Macro Assemble (MASM)
it is not pure asm ...
it has such things like :

.while
.if
.elif
structures...
invoke ( this is the calling macro...)
no more
...
push _val3
push _val1
push _val0
call whatever
pop ebx
pop ebx
pop ebx
...
just :
...
invoke whatever,_val0,_val1,_val3
...
it does the above automaticly

actually it resembles C
even some porgrams that i make
have less writting than C!!!!


Yes it is usefull !!
Especialy if you have some time-critical modules
Best way is to design the module in C
Clean the code as much as you can
And translate it function by function into ASM...

BUT beware ! If you start to learn you will have to study every detail in your code!
Sometimes badly written code is slower that C! (because of the compiler)
If you can't beat the compiler ! don't code in ASM :)

Shiro
07-03-2002, 11:14 AM
I was wondering if anyone here knows ASM and if so, do u think its usefull to learn it(even if its just for helping understanding archetecure of computers


At university I've learned ASM, but currently I don't use it very much. Mostly because I don't need it and it is not a language which is very recommendable for large projects.

But it is very usefull to learn, just because programming in and understanding ASM requires you to study computer architecture and micrprocessor technology in special. When you understand these things, you'll understand why and how higher level languages work.

moemen ahmed
07-03-2002, 12:26 PM
I agree with u guys, thats why I gonna learn ASM bit by bit , as i find it amazing to know more about the archetcure of computer especially the RAM........

I got the book(Art of assembly) and some tutorials ....wish me good luck :)

if anyone like to co-operate so we can help each other it would be amazing::cool:

golfinguy4
07-03-2002, 01:24 PM
M.A.

Go to the assembly forum at www.flashdaddee.com and download the book titled assembly book.zip. It is in the sticky at the top of the board. This book is very good, new, and understandable.

Thats my humble opinion.:)

P.S. I found the exact link. It is http://64.91.238.78/forums/attachment.php?s=&postid=13651. Good Luck!

borko_b
07-03-2002, 01:29 PM
>>...Art of assembly...
is there anywhere in the net a copy of this book in html varriant

Shiro
07-03-2002, 01:34 PM
With Google you can find a lot of references to "the art of assembly":

http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/
http://www.planetpdf.com/mainpage.asp?WebPageID=326
http://www.arl.wustl.edu/~lockwood/class/cs306/books/artofasm/toc.html

moemen ahmed
07-03-2002, 01:37 PM
Art of assembly is available in http://onlinereferences.dynodns.net:6969/or/default.asp
as PDF file.its free registeration , go and check it

thank you guys..........


OMG Im spending my time now on learning c++ and improve my abilities in VB beside the new visitor(ASM the monister :):rolleyes:

Shiro
07-03-2002, 01:42 PM
You could also consider to take a look at Java. This language is used a lot these days. It can be found anywhere, in embedded systems, internet applications, IT applications etc. But I understand it could be too much at once. :)

johnc
07-03-2002, 06:49 PM
i didnt start htis thread, but ive been looking for a good asm tutorial for along time, and i had AoA(art of assembly) but it tuaght high level assembly HLLA, and i wanted to learn actual pure assembly, anyways. thx.

Hillbillie
07-03-2002, 07:17 PM
>Go to the assembly forum at www.flashdaddee.com and download the book titled assembly book.zip. It is in the sticky at the top of the board. This book is very good, new, and understandable.<

Yes. I can't emphasize enough how good that book is. Aren't you the one that posted it, golfinguy?

IMO, that book makes AoA shameful...

golfinguy4
07-03-2002, 08:35 PM
Yep, I did put it up. I hate AoA; it is crap. It isn't even real assembly.

Hillbillie
07-03-2002, 10:02 PM
The thing I like about this one is it's focused on 32-bit assembly in protected mode...which is right down my alley.

moemen ahmed
07-03-2002, 10:13 PM
The thing I like about this one is it's focused on 32-bit assembly in protected mode...which is right down my alley.

may u make it more clear for me...please :)

Hillbillie
07-04-2002, 12:13 AM
>may u make it more clear for me...please<

What exactly can I clarify? :confused: It teaches you 32-bit protected mode assembly in contrast with the 16-bit real mode assembly AoA teaches.

moemen ahmed
07-04-2002, 01:42 AM
whats the defference between protected mode and real mode ?

Hillbillie
07-04-2002, 12:56 PM
>whats the defference between protected mode and real mode ?<

The biggest difference is that in protected mode, you can use all 4 GB of memory. You can't in real mode.

In protected mode, you can "do away" with segments. You'll still have segments, but they will cover the entire 4 GB.

Real mode is 16-bit. This means that you can only address 16 bits of memory at one time. 32-bit protected mode is 32-bits, meaning you can address 32 bits of memory at one time.

Since 32-bit protected mode is 32-bits, the code that runs in 32-bit PM is 32-bits. Since the BIOS code is 16-bits, you cannot directly use BIOS interrupts in PM. There's ways around this though (slow, but they work).

Enmeduranki
07-04-2002, 03:22 PM
Or you could try something a little different (http://www.cs.wisc.edu/~larus/spim.html).

moemen ahmed
07-04-2002, 03:59 PM
Or you could try something a little different.

in fact its something nice :) thank u man !