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Yaj
06-04-2002, 08:41 PM
How much math does programming involve? I heard it involves some Pre Calculous and Calculous but just for games and interactive type programs. I only know a little algebra (i wanted to go into higher maths but my mom didn't let me.. so basically i was forced against my own will to take general math for my first two years of highschool! now i see kids that don't know simple long division and are in Pre Calculous..i couldn've taken algebra in 9th grade! oh well -_-)

I would want to become a programmer but I don't know if they teach Calculous in college and I'm almost positive they don't teach Algebra 2 (and i know i won't get enough time to take that in highschool) so any information would be appriciated thanks.

SilentStrike
06-04-2002, 09:24 PM
You can understand the langauge easily with just some understanding of basic algebra.

kwigibo
06-04-2002, 10:38 PM
A solid english background is more important. But maths is a bonus. Soak up as much knowledge as possible. I believe you should do what you want to do too. :) If you want to do calculus do it. :)
Algebra and calculus apply to everyday life more than you would probably believe as well as physics and chemistry. But as I said do what you want to do. If you aren't doing something you want to do you will not enjoy it as much.

kwigibo

PS Don't go behind your mums back though talk to her about it and explain why you want to do calculus, don't disrespect your parents they are trying to do things in YOUR best interest

Unregistered
06-04-2002, 11:33 PM
if you havent taken any of the higher math your in for one hell of a bad time if you take calculus... and a CS degree involeves more math than in engeneering so you really want to brush up those math skills

and calculus is like no math you have ever taken before and you need to be really good at algerbra or youll be so lost it wont be funny

Vicious
06-05-2002, 12:15 AM
With me, its just certain things in math I cant understand ( cause my crappy books expact you to know and tell you nothing). But I havent had any problems with programming math wise... yet...

The way my mind sees it, if its not school, its not really hard.

Troll_King
06-05-2002, 12:32 AM
Math doesn't factor in very much for a while. Not until after you learn the language definitions such as C or C++. After you learn a graphics device interface than you will need to know more math because you are then basically drawing on the screen in order to simulate movement and realism, however that is only one type of program. You need math, however you have some time to learn it, no need to rush, but get involved with it if you can. Algebra will carry you through console and basic windows programming. it will carry you a long way actually. Learning to use algorithms that sort and store data involves math knowledge only if you are creating the algorithms. This typically isn't the case, you just have to learn how to use them.

You can also learn networking, system administration, shell scripting, etc. This just involves learning how to use the operating system in detail. There isn't any calculus involved there. It all depends on what you are planning to do. You might never need calculus unless for leisure or hobby.

MrWizard
06-05-2002, 01:07 AM
Let me put it to you like this. If you are interested in programming games then yes you will need a lot of math.

Calculus - You will need this mainly for Physics simulation

Linear Algebra - Everythin else.

I cannot stress how important Linear Algebra is. Again, you don't need high level math until you start getting into some serious programming.

skyline
06-05-2002, 02:09 AM
computer programming with a standard language (like c) in itself does not require much math (only arithmetic ops: +, -, /, *). but just knowing how to program in c doesn't do anything for anybody. the importance of your programming skills is applying them to solve a problem or practical application, which might involve some higher-level math (i.e. a company hires you to write a program the performs fast fourier transforms).

if you wanted to study cs after high school then you have no choice but to take the math. in your position right now, it would really help if you could at least get the trig. and pre-calc. done before graduating from high-school.

Troll_King
06-05-2002, 03:48 AM
You need math in order to make a light saber too.

Commander
06-05-2002, 07:39 AM
I thought u absolutely needed math for programming! Y would the universities ask for REALLY high marks in math and calculas if it was just a bunus?? You need the power of math if you want to program an AI or a Good game(well that's what I think)

Jet_Master
06-05-2002, 07:41 AM
Good maths skills REALLY help in Programming.
No math = weak programs...

DrakkenKorin
06-05-2002, 12:21 PM
Another reason most universities/colleges require so many math courses (namely Cal I, II, III and Linear Algebra) is to fill the requirement for a Science Degree (which vary by insititution).

In most institutions, you only need approx. between 40-50 hrs of actually COMPUTER science. Well for a degree that requries 120 hrs (again, varies by institution), it needs some filler sciences, hence Math, and Physics.

I have no problem with math, but me and Physics get along like rival gang members. Am I glad I'm not a CS major!

Grayson_Peddie
06-05-2002, 12:43 PM
Hey!

I scored 13 in the Sky Math Test at FSDB! But however, I am visually-impaired and got a special deploma, and have to take a G.E.D. to go to college that require regular deploma. Because I am taking Algebra II and VC++. :D ;) :D

ygfperson
06-05-2002, 01:05 PM
algebra is as important as reading. everyone should know it. as for programming, it's all mostly algebra. (until you get into graphics...)

Yaj
06-05-2002, 01:21 PM
"PS Don't go behind your mums back though talk to her about it and explain why you want to do calculus, don't disrespect your parents they are trying to do things in YOUR best interest"

If I brought this up with my mom she wouldn't get upset but just go into a breakdown. I know she's looking out for my best interest but sometimes I need to make decisions for myself that involve my future.

mike_k
06-05-2002, 01:29 PM
good math skills can really make it easier to program, and can make your program a lot easier to understand and a lot more efficient. one way i noticed it helped was to get rid of useless loops that made my program confusing by simplifying things into equations.

smokeybear
06-05-2002, 01:43 PM
Is math really needed? I hate Math and have a tutor. That's never good now is it?

Troll_King
06-05-2002, 03:02 PM
No need for math until you get into graphics programming. I think that math is a bit of a ploy by schools used in order to make them appear to be powerful, however society is all about money, definately not about science or math, and the schools know it. Sure there are many ways to apply math to graphics programming, but apparently DirectX does most of the work for you.

Personally I like math, however I feel that a great deal of it is useless. That's just my opinion though.

sean
06-05-2002, 04:47 PM
I agree wholeheartedly with an earlier post. Algebra flows nicely into geometry, and geo into trig, but then calculus - it's almost not even math. It's more science.

Yaj
06-05-2002, 07:49 PM
"You can also learn networking, system administration, shell scripting, etc. This just involves learning how to use the operating system in detail. There isn't any calculus involved there. It all depends on what you are planning to do. You might never need calculus unless for leisure or hobby."

what exactly is shell scripting?

Troll_King
06-05-2002, 08:27 PM
It's using the langauge of the command shell. The command shell is a program that that interprets command line linstructions. It is used by administrators who have to perform common tasks. They create batch files that regulate user accounts, and other stuff. I'm not an administrator so I don't know all the details. In Unix there is more than one shell, you have the C-shell, the Boure Shell, the Korn shell, etc.

Troll_King
06-05-2002, 08:31 PM
The point I was trying to make about the math is that you need far less math than you should need. It's almost getting to the point where you don't need to learn the computer languages either, you just have to know tools and notation.

Zeeshan
06-06-2002, 09:42 AM
If you want to get a CS degree, you'll have to go into deeper mathematics. It doesn't matter whether it is or it isn't used in the kinda programming you'll be doing.

Calculus, Trigonometry, Vectors, Algebra, Analytical Geometry, Induction...

Some basic usage :

Algorithm design : calculus, induction, algebra
Graphics : algebra, vectors, trig.
User Interface : algebra
everything else : algebra