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audinue
02-22-2009, 02:16 AM
Please tell me the best one you think. C++ IDE that you love.

And occasionally its features.

Thanks in advance.

valaris
02-22-2009, 02:20 AM
Visual Studio 2008...
If you can get it I don't think you can really top it.

cyberfish
02-22-2009, 02:55 AM
Notepad++ on Windows, gedit on Linux, gcc/gdb/gprof/make on the command line.

Elkvis
02-22-2009, 02:59 AM
for windows, I like Visual Studio 2005 or 2008, but for any other platform, NetBeans really does it for me.

audinue
02-22-2009, 03:07 AM
Awesome! Ok, anything else?

laserlight
02-22-2009, 03:11 AM
Besides Visual Studio, I use the cross platform Code::Blocks (http://www.codeblocks.org), and a lightweight IDE named Geany (http://www.geany.org) functions as my normal text editor, though I also use Notepad++.

*Moved to General Discussions*

PING
02-22-2009, 04:34 AM
Code::Blocks, Dev-Cpp on Windows. On Linux, I stick to Kwrite+gcc.

Elysia
02-22-2009, 04:47 AM
Visual Studio because it features all that features I need, and some other useful tools, too. Plus it has a debugger, all in one package. Very handy.
It's also the only IDE and debugger that I'm familiar with.

anon
02-22-2009, 06:00 AM
Code::Blocks for larger things, wxDev-Cpp for smaller things (particularly single-file programs). Also Notepad++ (just viewing things and other languages).

SMurf
02-22-2009, 10:05 AM
Funny enough I tried Visual Studio 2003 recently and I reckon that 6.0 was better. A good example was just trying to open a text file for reference, in 6.0 this would open the built-in text editor, whereas in 2003 it ShellExecutes instead (bringing up Notepad). If I wanted that I would've used the Run dialog. :rolleyes:

But yeah, VS all the way.

Elysia
02-22-2009, 10:07 AM
Strange. At least 2008 doesn't do that. Or at least VS doesn't do it for ME.

BMJ
02-22-2009, 11:08 AM
In Windows I use Visual Studio and for plain text editing I use notepad++.

In Linux I just use vim and gcc.

cpjust
02-22-2009, 12:32 PM
Visual Studio on Windows and Eclipse on Linux.

Ronix
02-22-2009, 12:40 PM
jEdit is my absolute favourite for any language, although I occasionaly use Visual Studio if I'm working on Windows

VirtualAce
02-22-2009, 01:39 PM
Visual Studio 2005 or 2008. 2003 is old, clunky, and intellisense and the function browser are 50% functional at best.

For Windows based development I don't think you can top Visual Studio 2008. To be fair it's not because Borland cannot make a better IDE but because they have chosen not to. And with as many years as they have been off the scene they would have a tremendous amount of 'catch-up' to do to match MSVS.

swgh
02-22-2009, 04:14 PM
MSVC++ 2008 although I do still have DevC++ 4.992 installed I use it for test programs and like said above its handy for small single file programs too.

I did have code::blocks but uninstalled it. And I agree with Bubba, 2003 is "deceprecated" as MS themselves like to put it :p I have had 2005 too at one point and found it to be good, I upgraded to 2008 at the turn of the year.

happyclown
02-22-2009, 04:59 PM
M$ VC++ 2008 for me.

I started using it about a month ago, only because I kept seeing Elysia recommending it to other people.

And I can see why, it's GREAT! :)

Cell
02-22-2009, 09:49 PM
XEmacs & gcc/g++.

Doodle77
02-22-2009, 10:13 PM
SciTE + gcc/friends on both Windows and Linux.

novacain
02-23-2009, 12:51 AM
MSVC 2003 with Visual Assist (by Whole Tomato Software)

MSVC 6 (for legacy apps)

MSVC 2005 (for web based interfaces to browse our DBs or config our remote units as we do not give our the UID::PWDs)

I am evaluating MSVC 2008 for new development.

These are the only IDEs I have ever used comercially in the last 10 + years.

Elysia
02-23-2009, 03:46 AM
Visual Assist does terrific wonders for IntelliSense. It's just a shame it costs so much.

zacs7
02-23-2009, 05:47 AM
vim all the way. I find it's certainly faster for some things but other things it's a pain in the ass.

I mainly use it because it's everywhere and very nice :)

cpjust
02-23-2009, 07:30 AM
vim all the way. I find it's certainly faster for some things but other things it's a pain in the ass.

I mainly use it because it's everywhere and very nice :)

Everywhere except on non-UNIX systems.
"very nice" is an interesting description of it. I have quite a few descriptive words for it too. :D

sean
02-23-2009, 09:32 AM
There's gvim for non-UNIX systems. My boss uses it on XP nad has it customized like you wouldn't believe - very nice setup.

MS IDEs are very nice and professional. At work they give us FlexBuilder / Eclipse preinstalled (we all do either Java or Flex) and recommend we use it, but I can't stand how sluggish it can be. That's my problem with MS as well.

I prefer to use Notepad++ or a very lightweight editor (on Linux I use gedit, because it already has very nice syntax highlighting). That's all a matter of style, though.

sorrofix
02-23-2009, 06:07 PM
On a UNIX system I use vi. On other systems (read: Windows) I usually end up using the VS 2005 IDE or SciTE/Notepad++.

Masterx
02-24-2009, 12:13 PM
Code::Blocks for larger things, wxDev-Cpp for smaller things (particularly single-file programs). Also Notepad++ (just viewing things and other languages).
same here , plus a visual studio 2008 .
most of the time( almost always) i use CodeBlocks, because it is cross platform and available on linux, mac, windows and also it provides a GUI designer for Wxwidgets which again is a crossplatform C++ GUI toolkit! and... its just lovely!

DevC++ for small projects, most of the time i use it to check my functions or class members to see whether they work or not!