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happyclown
02-15-2009, 06:23 AM
http://i538.photobucket.com/albums/ff349/pluckaduck2/women1.jpg

http://i538.photobucket.com/albums/ff349/pluckaduck2/women2.gif

http://i538.photobucket.com/albums/ff349/pluckaduck2/women3.gif

:D

Akkernight
02-15-2009, 06:41 AM
lol! xD the best one was the first, me thinks xP and NO! I'm not a sexist >.>

abachler
02-15-2009, 08:29 AM
That first one is awesome ;)

ಠ_ಠ
03-03-2009, 11:40 PM
Money is the root of all evil, not of all problems

laserlight
03-04-2009, 01:21 AM
Money is the root of all evil, not of all problems
The biblical quote is "the love of money is the root of all evil", so changing it to "money is the root of all problems" is a good way to get the intended point across.

Snafuist
03-05-2009, 11:36 AM
Personally, I'm a huge fan of good jokes, involving gender, religion, race and other funny concepts of categorization. I'm also pretty sure that women involved in technical activities (programming, engineering, math, ...) can either laugh about it or at least don't care. But making fun of women in a "scientific" way is still really bad, because it may prevent young girls to go for a scientific career. This is making me sad occasionally. I've been talking to lots of women who would have become great scientists but eventually didn't, because some idiot came up with a lame joke. This is of course not the only reason, but on the other hand there's no need to make it more difficult than it already is.

I like this picture which has obviously been taken at someone's attic (garret? loft?):
http://www.0xe3.com/pr0n/ergreift-technische-berufe.jpg

The sign reads: "Women and girls! Boldly and bravely apply for technical jobs!"


So, let me finish with my favorite sexist joke: "At the area where men think, women have a hole"

Greets,
Philip

ಠ_ಠ
03-05-2009, 11:41 AM
So, let me finish with my favorite sexist joke: "At the area where men think, women have a hole"

Greets,
Philip

the pooper?

Snafuist
03-05-2009, 11:59 AM
the pooper?


I once told a joke, and someone didn't get it. Two weeks later, he mentioned that he himself had now been telling the joke three times since, and none of the people didn't understand it either.

I don't know how you're supposed to understand a joke by telling it to other people, but maybe you're lucky.


On a sidenote, I'm pretty sure that the sign on the picture above is from 1940 or '41, because afterwards, the typeface has been forbidden by the NSDAP: the typeface is called "Schwabacher", a common Jewish name. But in this case, it just points to the origin of the typeface, namely a town called "Schwabach". Funny nazis... Anyway, what I wanted to say is that the sign doesn't reflect the open-mindedness of Germany around that time, but rather indicates that by that time, most of the male workers were either at war or already dead.

Greets,
Philip

cpjust
03-05-2009, 12:12 PM
They banned a typeface? WTF???
Who are they to say who can or cannot use an ugly typeface? :)

matsp
03-06-2009, 03:35 AM
They banned a typeface? WTF???
Who are they to say who can or cannot use an ugly typeface? :)

I find it quite pretty, myself - however, it's not very readable if you are not used to it.

--
Mats

QuantumPete
03-10-2009, 11:25 AM
I find it quite pretty, myself - however, it's not very readable if you are not used to it.

--
Mats

If you want a hard-to-read german typeface, try the Suetterlin Schrift (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/S%C3%BCtterlin.svg/250px-S%C3%BCtterlin.svg.png).

QuantumPete

cpjust
03-10-2009, 02:02 PM
If you want a hard-to-read german typeface, try the Suetterlin Schrift (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/S%C3%BCtterlin.svg/250px-S%C3%BCtterlin.svg.png).

QuantumPete

O - MY - GOD!
That's barely more readable than the Wingdings (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wingdings) font. :p

brewbuck
03-10-2009, 06:05 PM
So if you ask an engineer, who happens to be a woman, to explain women, what will you get?

My wife could code circles around half the people here.

Elysia
03-11-2009, 04:20 AM
So if you ask an engineer, who happens to be a woman, to explain women, what will you get?

Exchange women for men in the equations?

Masterx
03-11-2009, 12:07 PM
the first and the last one are just superior !:lol

Sparrowhawk
03-11-2009, 12:59 PM
Somewhat related to this thread:

http://kotaku.com/5143550/mario-explains-relationships-for-us

I found that pretty humorous :D

MK27
03-11-2009, 01:10 PM
Somewhat related to this thread:

http://kotaku.com/5143550/mario-explains-relationships-for-us

I found that pretty humorous :D

I didn't even get to the meat -- I fell off my chair when I saw the "SING HERO" logo and read this annoucement:

"Last week, Activision filed a trademark application for something called Sing Hero...."

I really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really hope that comes to pass. As long as I don't have to play it.

[edit] okay I read the rest and now I'm crying, I hope you are happy...

lruc
03-12-2009, 05:01 AM
I didn't even get to the meat -- I fell off my chair when I saw the "SING HERO" logo and read this annoucement:

"Last week, Activision filed a trademark application for something called Sing Hero...."

I really, really, really, really, really, really, really, really hope that comes to pass. As long as I don't have to play it.

[edit] okay I read the rest and now I'm crying, I hope you are happy...

How dare you use red text with no link. That's just downright misleading. I think ill make it blue. Actually ill just make the whole post a rainbow.

ಠ_ಠ
03-12-2009, 07:42 AM
How dare you use red text with no link. That's just downright misleading. I think ill make it blue. Actually ill just make the whole post a rainbow.

rainbows have red in them

Snafuist
03-13-2009, 05:31 AM
If you want a hard-to-read german typeface, try the Suetterlin Schrift (http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/thumb/8/83/S%C3%BCtterlin.svg/250px-S%C3%BCtterlin.svg.png).


I learned to write in the Sütterlin typeface myself several weeks ago. It's so unreadable because "e" looks nearly exactly like "n". Every other letter more or less resembles its latin counterpart, though I'm still having trouble to read Sütterlin texts fluently (or at all, depending on the writer's skills).

Furthermore, QuantumPete's picture shows how it looks when Sütterlin is written by third graders who try to impress their teacher (or used to... the font has been forbidden in schools in 1941 and has never been taught again in Germany).

Here are some more examples:

A recipe for "Tiroler Krapferln": http://www.sagen.at/doku/fo_fotos/Tirolerkrapferl.jpg
(perfectly readable)

A letter from Clotilde: http://www.vogtverlag.de/images/suetterlin.png
(harder to read, but I like the look)

Another letter: http://www.grossvaterbriefe.de/userfiles/u1/facsimile.jpg
(absolutely cryptic, the only thing I can read are the first two words: "My dear ...")


If there's someone around here who has texts written by experienced writers, I'd be glad to hear from you. My only source for practice material is the archive of the land registry office, and apart from the fact that these texts are full of abbreviations, they're plain boring.

Greets,
Philip

cpjust
03-13-2009, 06:37 AM
Other than the fact that it's virtually impossible to read, I still don't see why anyone would ban a specific typeface??

Snafuist
03-13-2009, 01:21 PM
Other than the fact that it's virtually impossible to read, I still don't see why anyone would ban a specific typeface??

The "Schwabacher" typeface has been forbidden because Hitler/Bormann assumed it to be of Jewish origin (which is wrong, it's named after a town called "Schwabach"). As their solution for the "Jewish question" was the extinction of Jews and Jewish culture, it seems natural to restrict the use of a "Jewish" typeface. This semi-confidential newsletter from Borman instructs party members and the press on behalf of Hitler to discontinue the use of the Schwabacher "Judenlettern" (Jew-typeface) and use Antiqua instead: http://upload.wikimedia.org/wikipedia/commons/b/bc/Schrifterlass_Antiqua1941.gif

The Sütterlin typeface has been forbidden because the ultimate goal of the Nazi regime was dominance in Europe. But for the subordinated populaces to be able to understand written commandments, the Germans had to use a typeface that everyone was able to read. These subordinated people were not designated to be taught anything, and during a radio broadcast, Goebbels once uttered less charmingly: "we shall not hesitate to call them slaves". As a consequence, Hitler decided that German children should learn to read and write an internationally recognized typeface, namely the one that we're all used to today.


Generally, it's hard to find any sense in the Nazi legislation at all. Its cruelty and malice is only superseded by the communist empire during the cold war. Today, it may sound funny to forbid typefaces, but I can spot a high amount of consistency with the Nazi ideology.

Greets,
Philip

cpjust
03-13-2009, 01:31 PM
Well I understand why the Nazi's banned it, but is it still banned today? If so, that makes no sense.

Snafuist
03-13-2009, 02:46 PM
Well I understand why the Nazi's banned it, but is it still banned today? If so, that makes no sense.


No, it's not banned. Today, the use of symbols commonly associated with National Socialism (such as the swastika, the "SS" Sig rune etc.) is forbidden, which is equally funny. By using, showing or even selling products with such symbols, you may get imprisoned for up to three years. Same goes for certain books, such as "Mein Kampf". In Germany, these books haven't been published since early 1945. Their possession used to be illegal, but I'm not sure about the current situation.

Besides, there's the Antifa, a partly radical and partly illegal "anti-fascist movement", active in all major cities, and of course there's the average populace which tends to highly dislike any visible connections to National Socialism. In Germany, nobody would dare to publicly show a swastika, because you would run the risk of having your teeth kicked in after at most ten minutes.

Using the Schwabacher or Sütterlin typeface is not forbidden, but it may get you into trouble because of its connection to the time before 1945.

I know that this sounds ridiculous. It is.

Greets,
Philip

CornedBee
03-13-2009, 04:46 PM
The "Wiederbetätigungsgesetze" (something like "laws about doing it again") in Germany and Austria were created mostly to appease the Sowjet Union. In the years after the war, one main problem for these countries was that the Sowjets were trying to exert control, and the western Allies were trying to exert counter-control, leaving Germany and Austria to be squashed in the middle. The laws were basically created to pull away political ground from the Sowjets, who were using the fear of the reestablisment of national socialism as a major argument in their continued pressure.

On the social level, of course, showing sympathy with nazis is going to give you serious problems, but the legal system should not have such prejudices. (You're allowed to show sympathy for other radical groups, after all. Freedom of opinion, and all that.) Yet is has, mostly as a relic from that time, but also because it would be an extremely unpopular move to get rid of them. It would get the proposers stamped as nazi sympathizers immediately.

cpjust
03-13-2009, 05:40 PM
On the social level, of course, showing sympathy with nazis is going to give you serious problems, but the legal system should not have such prejudices. (You're allowed to show sympathy for other radical groups, after all. Freedom of opinion, and all that.) Yet is has, mostly as a relic from that time, but also because it would be an extremely unpopular move to get rid of them. It would get the proposers stamped as nazi sympathizers immediately.

Who's showing sympathy for Nazi's?
BTW, what "them" are you referring to by "unpopular move to get rid of them"?

ಠ_ಠ
03-13-2009, 05:46 PM
Who's showing sympathy for Nazi's?
BTW, what "them" are you referring to by "unpopular move to get rid of them"?

The person trying to remove the anti-Nazi laws. The anti-Nazi laws.