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C-Compiler
12-23-2008, 11:16 AM
I program in C++ and I have a pretty good idea of what im doing but Im not an expert. Ive been self tought for about 9 months now, the first 6 in basic C. So I was wondering my copy of Visual Studio allows me to program in C# and Visual Basic, so I was curious if they are worth learning Visual Basic I looked at but didnt like and I have no idea about C#.

Sebastiani
12-23-2008, 11:27 AM
I program in just about any language that the job demands, but in general, I prefer using C++. As far as C# and VB, they're pretty useful for platform-specific stuff, but suffer from (rather irritating and non-intuitive) language defects.

Yarin
12-23-2008, 11:30 AM
I would become yet more familiar with C/C++ before moving on to another language.
You may feel comfortable with C++ now, but after 9 months, there's still a bit more about the language to learn, mainly how to efficiently use it.
Let me put it this way, it's much better to know only a few languages really well than to know a bunch of languages only enough to get by.
I'd wait.

Thantos
12-23-2008, 11:34 AM
It depends on what I'm writing. Right now I probably spend most of my time in PHP as I'm doing web applications. For desktop I'm spending more time in Java as I'm doing GUI programs. For CPU bound applications I tend to use C or C++. And for embedded programs I use C.

I haven't used C# and have only limited experience with VB. VB annoys me, a lot, so I tend to say away from it.

Thantos
12-23-2008, 11:36 AM
I actually completely disagree with Yarin. IMO it is better to broaden your horizons early before you get set into thinking in one mode of thinking. I think people would be better off if they were exposed to a bunch of different languages, especially if they use different paradigms, early on so that they can learn when to switch to another language for a particular task.

jwenting
12-23-2008, 11:44 AM
For the last decade mostly Java, a bit of Ruby, some Rexx, C++, C, Delphi.
Also Javascript, Python, an ever increasing amount of PL/SQL.

Before that also x86 Assembler, Cobol, Fortran, Basic, Pascal.

Try to learn new languages regularly, even if you don't use them in anger they give you a different perspective on things, make you a better developer.

matsp
12-23-2008, 11:54 AM
The last few (15 or so) years, I've used C, C++ and PHP, along with a few lines of assembler now and again.

Knowing more than one language (of different origin) is always good to get yourself a broader base to work on things from.

--
Mats

stevesmithx
12-23-2008, 12:08 PM
I am coding for the past 1 year or so (:p lol) and I usually code in C or java.

prog-bman
12-23-2008, 12:16 PM
I program mainly in C# right now. I like it alot.

But I still have a strong love for the C++. I just don't get to program in it everyday at work.

I have also messed around with VB.net. It and C# are very similar as far as what you can do. But I am not a fan of vb syntax. So I would choose C# over it any day.

cpjust
12-23-2008, 01:41 PM
In my current job it's Java, Perl & Bash; in my last job C++, Java, Rexx & Batch files; before that C++, Rational Visual Test (which is basically like VB) & Batch files.

So yeah, learning different languages would be useful. Given the trend to move toward more (binary) portable languages like Java, I would suggest learning Java for sure, and VB even though I hate it, is good to know. Scripting languages like Bash & Perl are good too.

VirtualAce
12-23-2008, 04:38 PM
...even if you don't use them in anger ...

How do you use a language in anger? Actually with VB that sorta makes sense.

I program in primarily in C++ but dabble some in C# and ActionScript.

michaelp
12-23-2008, 05:23 PM
I use D when I program.
Used to use C++.

kermit
12-23-2008, 06:57 PM
I actually completely disagree with Yarin. IMO it is better to broaden your horizons early before you get set into thinking in one mode of thinking. I think people would be better off if they were exposed to a bunch of different languages, especially if they use different paradigms, early on so that they can learn when to switch to another language for a particular task.

I think there is some merit to this. Being limited in my time (I don't program for a living, but do something completely unrelated) I don't have the 'luxury' of spending a lot of time mastering any language, let alone one. C is the language I am most comfortable with, and though I have taken stabs at C++ (Python too), and really like some of the features it offers, I find that it is overwhelmingly large to learn, given lack of time. Seeing that C is my 'favourite' language, I tend to fall to it for *every* program I write, even if there might be a better language to use. This is actually something I was just thinking about the last couple of days; I have been contemplating writing a regex tutor of sorts, and already I am thinking in terms of C, and wondering if there might be an easier way (Python might work well enough). Sometimes I think it is time to learn a different language. I think I am crippling my efforts, because for some things, C is just a lot more work than is necessary.

As an aside, does anyone here relate to the idea that you like your first language most, because it was your 'first'? :)

indigo0086
12-23-2008, 07:55 PM
I use mainly C#, I haven't used C++ in a while, and when I did I never did anything in it. I'm lacking a nice project to keep me occupied. Netflix has taken over.

zacs7
12-23-2008, 08:00 PM
Just C and Java for now, I'd love to get into C++ but I've got 2 largish projects going at the moment (one in C, one in Java).

Other than that, vbscript at work (poor me!) and a bit of Perl.

psychopath
12-23-2008, 08:55 PM
C++, C++/CLI and ObjC these days. Java at school mostly.

Mad_guy
12-23-2008, 09:11 PM
(As I think many of you would know by now...) About 90% of my code these days is written in Haskell. I also use a bit of C too since it's tremendously helpful sometimes.

I use lots of languages on the side, though - recently I've been investigating clojure (http://clojure.org), which is a lisp that is very nicely integrated with the JVM - you get access to the abundance of java code out there, but you can write in a nice, fairly clean lisp that embodies functional and concurrent programming (and the benevolent dictator of this project seems very dedicated to making it work and be pragmatic.) If you have to work with the JVM and want to try something, it's pretty enjoyable. :]

stevesmithx
12-23-2008, 09:25 PM
How do you use a language in anger? Actually with VB that sorta makes sense.

I program in primarily in C++ but dabble some in C# and ActionScript.

It would make sense if you are programming in whitespace (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Whitespace_(programming_language))

abachler
12-24-2008, 02:25 AM
I know C/C++, several flavors of BASIC, and assembly for a couple dozen microprocessors and microcontrollers (80x86, 6800 series, 6500 series, 8501, even some really old ones like the 4004. Ive also designed and built my own processors out of decrete logic. I know industry has this impetus to drive programmers to learn higher and higher level languages, but honestly, I think that is the wrong direction, regardless of all the perfectly logical arguments for it. Some things are just wrong no matter how much you can justify them.

zacs7
12-24-2008, 03:42 AM
> several flavors of BASIC
You must mean "sub-flavors", because there's only one true flavor of BASIC and that's "poo flavored".

> I think that is the wrong direction, regardless of all the perfectly logical arguments for it.
So do I... well it depends on the task. But I do see a big window that could be opening up when the oldies retire and there aren't enough "low-level" programmers to maintain code or work with mainframes and alike. But that's my secret so I can get all the money and chicks in a few years.

Sebastiani
12-24-2008, 09:19 AM
>> I know industry has this impetus to drive programmers to learn higher and higher level languages, but honestly, I think that is the wrong direction, regardless of all the perfectly logical arguments for it. Some things are just wrong no matter how much you can justify them.

Well, assembly language certainly has it's place (optimizations, utilizing processor-specific extensions, etc), but it just isn't practical for developing large programs, IMO.

VirtualAce
12-24-2008, 09:56 AM
I think it is important to understand what you are looking at in assembly. Believe it or not there are some issues that I've had to address professionally that required me to pour through some assembly and find out what was going on even though assembly is not a requirement.

I would never develop in assembly but it sure helps with debugging or when the compiler generates some crazy code to do something extremely simple. I know compilers are great and awesome and these days they are near 'perfect' but if you actually look at some of what they spit out in the end you might be surprised by what you find.

abachler
12-24-2008, 11:51 AM
Well, assembly language certainly has it's place (optimizations, utilizing processor-specific extensions, etc), but it just isn't practical for developing large programs, IMO.

Granted, but I'm not suggesting everyone use nothing but assembly, only that C/C++ is as high level as we really need. You realyl cant abstract the thought process any more than that. But it seems they want to create a language than non-programmers (realyl people who cant pogram) can use to program which is a bit of a daft notion. For one, the ability to program in any language substantially makes you a programmer of some sort. Secondly, you will never come up with any programming language that doesnt require the capacity for abstract thought, so programming will never be a job that 'the masses' can do. While it doesnt necessarily take abstract thought to learn a language, it is required to effectively apply that knowledge.