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indigo0086
12-09-2008, 05:24 AM
I started my internship around august (on a month break until next semester starts again) and it has been ASP.NET development, so I've been using mainly C# and Javascript. I am doing some web development stuff on the side, but don't want to lose touch with C++, and until I finish school I can't focus entirely on C++ these days.

Anything new I need to know about?

abachler
12-09-2008, 05:38 AM
The programming community at large voted to deprecate C++ in favor of LOLCODE, other than that, nothing new (j/k) :)

SlyMaelstrom
12-09-2008, 05:43 AM
Bjarne Stroustrup actually turned out to be an evil super-computer from the planet Zolak. C++0x is postponed indefinitely.

indigo0086
12-09-2008, 05:56 AM
I hope Bjarne Doesn't write a book on C++0x, I dropped my chinese import of his C++ programming language book. Imagine that multiplied by 0x.

jwenting
12-09-2008, 07:24 AM
I'm with you. I'm writing mainly PL/SQL these days myself.
That's where the money is...

Mario F.
12-09-2008, 07:33 AM
Well, if it serves of any consolation to you, I'm also staying away from C++ for some time now. And for no good reason, and the replacement couldn't be "worst": I'm becoming hooked in learning all about assembly for the ZX Spectrum.

indigo0086
12-09-2008, 07:53 AM
I'm with you. I'm writing mainly PL/SQL these days myself.
That's where the money is...

For oracle databases of course. Others would say TSQL.

kypronite
12-09-2008, 07:53 AM
I hope Bjarne Doesn't write a book on C++0x, I dropped my chinese import of his C++ programming language book. Imagine that multiplied by 0x.

I planned to buy his C++ programming language special edition but with C++0x coming out soon,I'm sure he will write another c++ book :/

indigo0086
12-09-2008, 07:56 AM
I don't like his writing style, very...classical.

lruc
12-09-2008, 04:34 PM
I don't like his writing style, very...classical.

That's why I like it.

Mario F.
12-09-2008, 05:22 PM
I don't like his writing style, very...classical.

In these days of Idiots Guides and other half-baked canned options, this comment doesn't surprise me anymore. Sign of times and the crap that is starting to hit the job market.

whiteflags
12-09-2008, 05:31 PM
I don't know, I don't find Prelude's writing very "classical" either, and it tends to be super-informative. I rather think it to be a fault in Bjarne's writing style. Most writers for computer science have the benefit of knowing English as a first language and not bothering to be as technical as the next Programmer Joe (or Jane, as the case has it). It really depends on the subject too. TC++PL is really a tome rather than an instructional manual, imo.

A programming discussion without its diatribes is just specification writing.

indigo0086
12-09-2008, 10:29 PM
In these days of Idiots Guides and other half-baked canned options, this comment doesn't surprise me anymore. Sign of times and the crap that is starting to hit the job market.

Considering the book I prefer is the one you recommended to me, it's a sign of your recommendations.

jwenting
12-10-2008, 12:17 AM
TC++PL is really a tome rather than an instructional manual, imo.


which is exactly how it was intended...
The samples and exercises are there to illustrate a point, not as a teaching aid.

abachler
12-10-2008, 10:33 AM
The thing to consider is that no single writing style will appeal to everyone. People have different levels of expectation, prior knowledge, reading comprehension, and intelligence.

matsp
12-10-2008, 10:44 AM
The thing to consider is that no single writing style will appeal to everyone. People have different levels of expectation, prior knowledge, reading comprehension, and intelligence.

That is correct. But I think jwenting's comments are more to the point - it describes the language, it is not trying to teach you how to use the language - you are assumed to have a good understanding of the subject of programming, basic understanding of programming languages, object orientation and other such things.

--
Mats

abachler
12-10-2008, 12:05 PM
That is correct. But I think jwenting's comments are more to the point - it describes the language, it is not trying to teach you how to use the language - you are assumed to have a good understanding of the subject of programming, basic understanding of programming languages, object orientation and other such things.

--
Mats

Which falls under expectations and prior knowledge. When I buy a cookbook, I dont expect it to teach me to cook; it is assumed that you have a basic understanding of food preperation technology. On the other hand if I buy 'How to cook for dummies' I would expect it to teach me what a measuring spoon is.

matsp
12-10-2008, 01:07 PM
Which falls under expectations and prior knowledge. When I buy a cookbook, I dont expect it to teach me to cook; it is assumed that you have a basic understanding of food preperation technology. On the other hand if I buy 'How to cook for dummies' I would expect it to teach me what a measuring spoon is.

I think we are in full agreement on all accounts - I just think that jwenting expessed the REASON that it's not a good teaching book, whilst you described the proverb "different hourses for different courses", but not the reason WHY it's different from a teaching type book.

--
Mats

Mario F.
12-10-2008, 01:53 PM
Considering the book I prefer is the one you recommended to me, it's a sign of your recommendations.

Which means your preference is C++ Primer, 4th Edition by Lippman, et al. A fine book indeed and I'm pleased you think so too.

Curiously enough though there's no distinct writing style on either this or C++ Programing Language's. Both books are absolutely transparent on what comes to show the writers style, and make an effort instead to be manuals of the C++ Programming Language.

If you see a difference, I commend you and must be certainly from the fact you carry a distinct advantage (or on this case, it appears, disadvantage) over me; your higher knowledge of the English language.

You can however say Stroustrup's book is clearly more terse. But, as said, it doesn't pretend to teach you how to program.

indigo0086
12-10-2008, 08:20 PM
I guess it's me then. I started reading the book not too long ago, even though I know a good deal of C++, but I wanted to hear it from the mouth of the creator.

The problem with the book and I is that not only are the code examples a bit short while doing quite a bit at times (reminds me of my Unix programming teacher), but even if I were to use it as a reference, the language used is very verbose and detail laden where as I'm used to more concise and "to the point" ways of having things described (via a code example or a short description, with the details as a sidebar. I like to have a clear line between the "core" and the earmarks.

I also was reading it from start to finish which probably isn't a good Idea for a "tome" or "reference" book, but it is written in a way that it comes off as an instructional guide.

c++0x
12-10-2008, 08:58 PM
I don lyk da way Stroustrup rites cuz he is lyk a teechr xplane.

jwenting
12-11-2008, 12:19 AM
I don lyk da way Stroustrup rites cuz he is lyk a teechr xplane.

http://catb.org/~esr/faqs/smart-questions.html#writewell

indigo0086
12-11-2008, 04:55 AM
looking over c++0x's posts he seems to be a contributing member despite his horrendous delivery. I think he's being ironic. Maybe he's like rain man.

stevesmithx
12-11-2008, 05:45 AM
looking over c++0x's posts he seems to be a contributing member despite his horrendous delivery. I think he's being ironic. Maybe he's like rain man.
Now I know why there is a www.noslang.com (http://www.noslang.com). :)

zacs7
12-11-2008, 06:00 AM
> Now I know why there is a www.noslang.com.
It doesn't do slang of his high-grade very well ;)

stevesmithx
12-11-2008, 06:42 AM
>It doesn't do slang of his high-grade very well
Indeed. ;)

jwenting
12-11-2008, 06:46 AM
1am n0 1337 hax0r?