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View Full Version : AVG Free is getting on my nerves



cboard_member
04-29-2008, 01:09 AM
For the last week or so, it's been sporadically popping up a dialog telling me about the new AVG 8 (which isn't free so far as I can tell). I was hoping it would only do this once or twice then take a clue when I never click on "Buy Now".

Nope. Every single morning, usually when I've just started to mellow out with a game or something - it wouldn't be such a problem if it didn't automatically minimise whatever I was doing and jump up. I hate that in a program.

The dialog is fugly too - one of those skinned-to-look-like-vista ones.

I've had a browse through the options and there's nothing I can see that will change this behaviour - fellow AVG users, am I not looking hard enough?

I'm on the verge of switching to another free anti-virus, if anyone wants to throw me some suggestions.

manav
04-29-2008, 01:25 AM
such a shame.
so far, in my experience, every application has a check box or some other options saying:
- Don't show again.
- Remind me later.
- I will manually do this blah . . .

Mario F.
04-29-2008, 01:26 AM
I don't have this problem. But I bet its your AVG Scheduler, since I have mine turned off... I always turn schedulers off when they are present. Try that.

Makes little sense to have it turned on for AVG. You still get to know when there's a new update to the core program or the virus database. This time from a simple balloon message on the taskbar. Either that or change the Update Plan B task on the scheduler to never check for updates. Don't worry, it will still tell you when there are new updates.

cboard_member
04-29-2008, 08:56 AM
Oooh ok. Thanks.

indigo0086
04-29-2008, 08:59 AM
It's not easy being free.

I don't get the buy me now reminder as much as I get those annoying updates that require you to restart, you can refuse to restart, but it disables avg.

Sang-drax
04-29-2008, 02:15 PM
There's really no need to use an anti-virus program anymore (if there ever was). Today almost almost all software is downloaded off the web from trusted sources (even pirated). Previously, software was shared from person to person --> viruses could spread. Maybe to prevent people from installing spyware etc., but if you trust everyone with admin access to your computer, you should be fine.

abachler
04-29-2008, 03:23 PM
.........

I only use legitimate software, no warez, no pirated stuff, don't visit warez sites, and AVG still finds virii on occasion. Oh, and my AVG doesnt pop up that thingy, so you must have left the setting on to notify you.

Neo1
04-29-2008, 03:35 PM
Abachler:

All you really need is Firefox and NoScript and a brain, has been working for me the past couple of years, no malware, no viruses, no hijackers, and i have no antivirus software, and the only firewall i have is the one in my router...

Mario F.
04-29-2008, 04:00 PM
Hmm... you are begging for the quintessential question: How do you know if you don't have any software to check if you are infected? ;)

Anyways, I dig you. However, it is very much dependent on usage and surfing habits. NopScript surely is a must. But if the family has access to your computer, or you usually take it outside and connect through wireless hotspots or the office network... you know.

mike_g
04-29-2008, 05:05 PM
I was always under the impression that theres not all that much dangerous stuff that javascript can do. Or at least its not a gaping malware free for all like ActiveX.

whiteflags
04-29-2008, 05:28 PM
Except that Javascript has an ActiveX interface itself.

mike_g
04-29-2008, 05:51 PM
Oh, I dident know that. Still, isent ActiveX mostly an IE thing. Also wouldent your browser notify you when its trying to install active x controls or has that been broken?

Mario F.
04-29-2008, 06:11 PM
javascript can be dangerous for many reasons -- like with most tools. Check google on "javascript dangers", "javascript exploits", "XSS" which is a mixture of JS and server-side scripting. "session stealing", "cookies stealing", ...

mike_g
04-29-2008, 06:12 PM
yeah, but cookie grabbing isent going to put a virus on a computer.

edit: tbh that kind of cookie grabbing doent worry me at all. I rarely do financial stuff via the internet. My cookies die when I close my browser so I generally just close and reopen it to flush them. Apparently theres ways of getting cookies as they are created over wireless, which is more disturbing, but tbh it still dosent bother me too much. At the end of the day its not like I'm rich and its the banks liability.

VirtualAce
04-29-2008, 08:27 PM
AVG 8 should be free on the free site. Normally when AVG releases a new version they release it for free on the free version of their site. But AVG has done so well that I would just as well buy it as use it for free. That coupled with Diskkeeper 2008 has kept my system running smooth.



There's really no need to use an anti-virus program anymore (if there ever was). Today almost almost all software is downloaded off the web from trusted sources (even pirated). Previously, software was shared from person to person --> viruses could spread. Maybe to prevent people from installing spyware etc., but if you trust everyone with admin access to your computer, you should be fine.


I don't agree that viruses are no longer a threat. In fact I find that view a bit short sighted and somewhat jumping to conclusions. They are still a very real threat. This statement almost made my jaw drop. The internet is by no means a safe place to browse even if you watch the sites you go to. I only visit programming sites and picked up 2 viruses last week. Other people at my work have claimed to pick up viruses after visiting game dev and other well known dev sites. I cannot verify or deny this claim about game dev but my viruses did show up after browsing the site. Not saying they came from there but it proves that no site is safe. The recent hacking we received ought to further solidify the fact that nothing is safe on the internet.

Sang-drax
04-30-2008, 12:07 AM
I don't agree that viruses are no longer a threat. In fact I find that view a bit short sighted and somewhat jumping to conclusions.I think it's true that viruses have a much harder time spreading today than 10 years ago when people shared software among each other instead of downloading form the internet.

Seriously, where do you people get these viruses? I still hope to see a computer virus, but after spending almost 20 years with computers, I have yet to see one. :p Coming to think of it, I think my parents computer got infected once about 6 years ago, but I'm not sure.


I cannot verify or deny this claim about game dev but my viruses did show up after browsing the site.You cannot get viruses from browsing the web, unless you use a really old, buggy and unpatched browser.

he recent hacking we received ought to further solidify the fact that nothing is safe on the internet.The hacking of this site really doesn't tell us anything about viruses.

I don't know what I'm arguing about, really. Of course some people consider viruses a threat and it's good that AV program exists. I just haven't ever seen the need for it personallty. I do an occasional online scan once a year or so and nothing ever shows up.

cboard_member
04-30-2008, 12:52 AM
>> AVG 8 should be free on the free site.

Heh, so it is. Thanks.

abh!shek
04-30-2008, 01:46 AM
Seriously, where do you people get these viruses? I still hope to see a computer virus, but after spending almost 20 years with computers, I have yet to see one. :p

Just go to those websites which prompt you to download "additional plugins" to watch that wonderful video, and you will get lots of viruses :D

Sang-drax
04-30-2008, 12:45 PM
To me, the term "virus" is a self-replicating program that infects other executables. This means that most malware are not viruses, like spyware, trojans, and other programs you get when you download these "additional plugins". There is really no point in making viruses anymore, because there are more efficient ways of spreading bad code.

Mario F.
04-30-2008, 01:48 PM
You can stretch that further and mention the fact a virus self-replication code targets the system memory, to distinguish them from virii-carrying worms.

However modern anti-virus software, while still holding old virus footprints on their database, are essentially anti-malware applications which search for far more than virii. The few "anti-virus" that aren't afraid of making this distinction (http://www.comodo.com/boclean/boclean.html) are often confused by users as not offering good enough protection or are frequently seen on their forums questions like "Should I also install an AV program? (http://forums.comodo.com/comodo_boclean_antimalware_faq/is_bo_clean_necessary_with_defense_and_antivirus-t20469.0.html)".

Going back to virus, if Windows Vista advertised security features prove to be true and their operation doesn't force a user to, as in the past, simply turn them off and log in as administrator, then I agree virii days are numbered. The main reason however they aren't as prevalent as before is twofold in my humble opinion:

- There are easier to code, more devastating, more interesting, alternatives like Trojans, rootkits, backdoor-carrying worms... that is, in the internet age traditional virus make little sense. The interest is in computer access, services relay and spying. I mean, self-replication is not even interesting anymore in a world of content sharing.

- On a surprising inversion of natural laws, virus writers fell behind AV technologies. A virus is hard to write and takes a lot of time and effort, especially the metamorphic ones. And yet, an AV could be updated in a matter of hours after first detection of a new threat. With the explosion of AVs and instant world-wide updates through internet access, virus writing is not a productive activity anymore.

I however completely agree with Bubba. The threats, these new threats, are real. More, new treats can be devised any time which can change our views of security. Ignoring AVs and firewalls is a bad idea, no matter the knowledge involved.

EDIT: Especially firewalls. A Personal Firewall has the potential to stop a new threat even before it was discovered.

abachler
04-30-2008, 03:45 PM
I do an occasional online scan once a year or so and nothing ever shows up.

Of course not. Unless you are installing executable code, it cant fidn anythign btu the simplest of virii. Its not like scanning fro cookies or searching for a filename. A real AV program has to run at kernel privelage to catch all virii. The sneakier ones will even overwrite parts of your BIOS.

brewbuck
04-30-2008, 03:52 PM
You cannot get viruses from browsing the web, unless you use a really old, buggy and unpatched browser.

Are you saying that only "old" bugs can be used to spread viruses? New bugs don't count? Your statement seems to imply that no new bugs will ever occur in browsers, which is obviously false. There will always be bugs, and until these bugs are fixed, they can be exploited to spread malware.


I don't know what I'm arguing about, really. Of course some people consider viruses a threat and it's good that AV program exists. I just haven't ever seen the need for it personallty. I do an occasional online scan once a year or so and nothing ever shows up.

You just aren't browsing to the right (or in this case, wrong) kinds of sites. The Internet has a vast, scummy underbelly where these things go on. I never go there, and you obviously don't either, but that doesn't make it less of a threat.