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h3ro
04-19-2008, 09:14 AM
Hallo,

I was thinking of buying some new books now and was wondering if someone could recommend something. I feel that I am starting to understand c++ OK, but I am no expert. I would like some books that focused on how to write good code, not just code.

So here is my shopping list:
* One book to have as a c++ syntax reference (Maybe "The C++ Programming Language" by Bjarne Stroustrup )
* The Art of Computer Programming (1-3) by Knuth
* A introduction to assembly. Any recommendations?
* A book about basic AI. Any recommendations?

Any other book anyone here strongly recommend? Im am ordering them from Amazon in US to Norway, so it is better to order several books at the same time.

Thanks

medievalelks
04-19-2008, 09:38 AM
You might check here:

http://www.accu.informika.ru/bookreviews/public/index.htm

Salem
04-19-2008, 10:11 AM
Good code comes from good design IMO. The technique you use to build a barbecue in the back garden won't work when it comes to building the house.
http://www.amazon.com/UML-Distilled-Standard-Addison-Wesley-Technology/dp/0321193687/ref=pd_bbs_sr_1?ie=UTF8&s=books&qid=1208621088&sr=8-1

Another shorter book list.
http://www.rafb.net/efnet_cpp/books/

Knuth is great if you want to know all about algorithms, but since the STL hides away a lot of that, do you really need to know it on a daily basis?

Mario F.
04-19-2008, 01:52 PM
I'd suggest, all from Addison Wesley,

Romanik & Muntz' Applied C++
Sutter & Alexandrescu's C++ Coding Standards
Scott Meyers' Effective C++ series

Not sure what to advise concerning AI. The only book I had was a borrowed one which I can't remember the title exactly, but it was from Premier Press. Wasn't entirely happy with it though.

As for design, other than Applied C++ which also brushes on this issue. I really like Applying UML and Patterns from Addison Wesley.

As for assembly no idea; This topic only marginally interests me.

laserlight
04-19-2008, 02:01 PM
I would like some books that focused on how to write good code, not just code.
There is Write Great Code (http://webster.cs.ucr.edu/WriteGreatCode/index.html) by Randall Hyde, which does dwell on assembly language.

DavidP
04-19-2008, 10:33 PM
Code Complete, which is published by Microsoft. It is quite good.

medievalelks
04-20-2008, 09:14 AM
Code Complete, which is published by Microsoft. It is quite good.

Ah yes, and oldie but a goodie. One of the first I read. I also liked "Writing Solid Code" by Maquire, but always got a kick out of the subtitle:

"Microsoft's Techniques for Developing Bug-Free C Programs"

Kind of like

"Id Software's Techniques for Developing Family Friendly Games"

h3ro
04-23-2008, 05:57 AM
Thanks a lot for the recommendations. Any assembly books I should look at?


Microsoft's Techniques for Developing Bug-Free C Programs"

Kind of like

"Id Software's Techniques for Developing Family Friendly Games"
Awesome!


Knuth is great if you want to know all about algorithms, but since the STL hides away a lot of that, do you really need to know it on a daily basis?
your right. Might try to find a good book on STL instead. I want a book on algorithms as well, as I have to do a "algorithms and data structures class" next year.

indigo0086
04-23-2008, 06:57 AM
how many books can you go through?

h3ro
04-23-2008, 07:50 AM
I was not planning to read them all now. But it is cheaper to order several at the same time for me, so I try to order several good books on topics that interests me

brewbuck
04-23-2008, 08:56 AM
I don't really have a comment on the other categories, but I want to say "Good on you" for choosing Knuth. That book is fairly intense.

Mario F.
04-23-2008, 11:02 AM
hmm... yes. Maybe too intense, actually.

Knuth is next to impossible to read if one doesn't have a strong background in computer science , or working for it. If that's not the case, I'd suggest staying away from this book as it may quickly become an exercise in frustration and move you from your current objective; Learning C++

medievalelks
04-23-2008, 07:29 PM
Two more:

Programming Pearls, by Bentley.

Conceptual Blockbusting, by Adams.