_beginthreadex does not complile

This is a discussion on _beginthreadex does not complile within the Windows Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; Oh I see, thank you. But tell me, what are the differences between the debug and release builds?...

  1. #16
    * Death to Visual Basic * Devil Panther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    768
    Oh I see, thank you.

    But tell me, what are the differences between the debug and release builds?
    "I don't suffer from insanity but enjoy every minute of it" - Edgar Allen Poe

    http://www.Bloodware.net - Developing free software for the community.

  2. #17
    CSharpener vart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Rishon LeZion, Israel
    Posts
    6,484
    there is a number of differences
    you can search inet
    For example:
    http://www.flounder.com/debug_release.htm
    The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time,
    the last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

  3. #18

  4. #19
    * Death to Visual Basic * Devil Panther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    768
    Quote Originally Posted by vart
    When you create project in VS2003 you already have 2 build "release" and "debug"

    When you enter Project Properties in the "Configuration" combo you will see Active(Debug) for example

    You can choose then the build you want and change settings for this build

    If you choose Release - select Multithreaded RunTime
    If you choose Debug - select MultiThreaded Debug RunTime

    Then only select the suitable build (combo on the standard toolbar) when you compile and link the exe
    Ok, so if I understand this correctly, the Release mode is an optimized version of the program, while Debug mode is the program as it was written?

    Also, what is the point of using Debug, why not use Release directly?
    It just seems like double work, no?
    "I don't suffer from insanity but enjoy every minute of it" - Edgar Allen Poe

    http://www.Bloodware.net - Developing free software for the community.

  5. #20
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
    Join Date
    Apr 2003
    Posts
    8,893
    No, it's no additional work at all for you, unless you consider flipping a compiler switch and waiting for it to compile again work.

    The debug version has its reason for existence in its name: debugging. Debug versions often contain additional code (behind the scenes, you usually don't notice it, unless you write debug code like assertions yourself, which you should) that do some sanity checking. That is, although you absolutely know a pointer can't be NULL, the debug version might check anyway, because there might be a bug somewhere that causes it to be NULL regardless. In release, this check is not there to improve performance.
    The other part is that after optimization, it can be very hard to map the execution status back to the source code, so line-by-line debugging is not possible with a release build. The debug build does not reorder instructions or apply any other optimizations, so mapping to source is rather easy.
    And of course, debug builds contain debug information. Every bit of program code has embedded annotations as to where it came from: which source file, which source line, how the variables where mapped to registers and memory regions, all that stuff that is usually lost in compilation. That's the main reason why debug versions are so much bigger than release versions. (We're talking factor 20 - 100 size increase here.)
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

  6. #21
    * Death to Visual Basic * Devil Panther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    768
    But it seems like the debug version creates a false reality, like the NULL example you just provided.

    It just seems like twice the work to detect problem, because something that works great in the Debug mode, might crash with the release version of the program.
    "I don't suffer from insanity but enjoy every minute of it" - Edgar Allen Poe

    http://www.Bloodware.net - Developing free software for the community.

  7. #22
    CSharpener vart's Avatar
    Join Date
    Oct 2006
    Location
    Rishon LeZion, Israel
    Posts
    6,484
    Quote Originally Posted by Devil Panther
    But it seems like the debug version creates a false reality, like the NULL example you just provided.

    It just seems like twice the work to detect problem, because something that works great in the Debug mode, might crash with the release version of the program.
    In most cases you will start working with release.
    When release crashes - you create debug version and try to debug it.
    If debug works fine - you know that the problem lies in the difference between debug and release - you start applying different technics for locating the problem (like building release build with debug info included, tracing etc)...

    But in most cases the problem that occured in release version occures also in debug, so using debugger with debug version greatly speeds up the process of locating the problem
    The first 90% of a project takes 90% of the time,
    the last 10% takes the other 90% of the time.

  8. #23
    * Death to Visual Basic * Devil Panther's Avatar
    Join Date
    Aug 2001
    Posts
    768
    So it's recomended to start the project with the Release mode, and if needed switch to Debug.

    Thank you all for your time and help.
    "I don't suffer from insanity but enjoy every minute of it" - Edgar Allen Poe

    http://www.Bloodware.net - Developing free software for the community.

Page 2 of 2 FirstFirst 12
Popular pages Recent additions subscribe to a feed

Similar Threads

  1. How do you complile a .pc file?
    By Unregistered in forum C Programming
    Replies: 7
    Last Post: 04-29-2002, 02:35 PM

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21