Finding access violations in the source

This is a discussion on Finding access violations in the source within the Windows Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; Hi! I've got a problem here (what a surprise! ). Given an access violation (address logged), there must be a ...

  1. #1
    Normal vector Carlos's Avatar
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    Finding access violations in the source

    Hi!
    I've got a problem here (what a surprise! ).

    Given an access violation (address logged), there must be a way to find out where the problem is in the source code, isn't it?

    Do you know a tool, which shows the function/method from where this access violation comes,given the corresponding dlls and pdbs, and, of course, the source code?

    Thank you in advance!

    Have a nice code,
    Carlos

  2. #2
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    You don't need a tool, just debug the code (with printf statements or just step through your program with the debugger).

    In most cases the Access Violation is because you are reading from or writing to memory which you didn't allocate.

  3. #3
    Normal vector Carlos's Avatar
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    I *do* know, why access violations happen .

    It's not a case you could easily debug...it's not about a homework, is a huge project, with many dlls and ocx-es.
    On the other side, the problem is sporadic, reproducing it might take days (trying to get the error for 3 days, haven't succeed yet).
    All I have is the log-file from our customer.

    I hope I made myself clear now...

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    Yes you made yourself clear. I had a simular problem last year (sporadic reset of machines). It took us about 8 months to find out what the problem was.

    I don't think you can use the address of the Access Violation because this is just some un-allocated memory.

  5. #5
    Normal vector Carlos's Avatar
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    I don't think you can use the address of the Access Violation because this is just some un-allocated memory.
    Actually is not the address of the un-allocated memory, but the address of the problem-code.
    Given the pdb file and the source, it is possible to track the source.

    By the way, we found an adequate tool, the CrashFinder. Seems to be very useful!
    You can find it here

    You can find information about CrashFinder (provided by the author) here
    Last edited by Carlos; 11-20-2002 at 04:26 AM.

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