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VS C++ Express - directory structure

This is a discussion on VS C++ Express - directory structure within the Windows Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; I got all excited to download this puppy after thinking about it for years. Unfortunately, MS offered only 64KB download ...

  1. #1
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    VS C++ Express - directory structure

    I got all excited to download this puppy after thinking about it for years. Unfortunately, MS offered only 64KB download speed for the 140 MB.

    Can someone explain the general directory structure (underlying) of the projects/source code/object code?

    I eventually want to move the whole thing to my D drive under a library VSCpp directory but aren't sure how to accomplish that without breaking anything? IOW, on one of the option screens, there are THREE destination directories you can change. I was hoping you'd point to the top directory branch and it would build the others based on that one.

    I'll have plenty of more questions about VS C++ later. Haven't even TRIED to use DEBUG (am using printfs so far like .bat debugging).

  2. #2
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Easiest way is to simply create a project and drop the files into the project. Visual Studio cares little for the path of the source files--it stores their path as part of the project, so you can organize them at will.

    Btw, if you intend to write C, then Visual Studio does not come with the best compiler for that. As an editor, it's excellent, but I don't recommend you use their compiler for C (C++ is another matter, though). You're best off using GCC IMO.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  3. #3
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    Quote Originally Posted by Elysia View Post
    Easiest way is to simply create a project and drop the files into the project. Visual Studio cares little for the path of the source files--it stores their path as part of the project, so you can organize them at will.

    Btw, if you intend to write C, then Visual Studio does not come with the best compiler for that. As an editor, it's excellent, but I don't recommend you use their compiler for C (C++ is another matter, though). You're best off using GCC IMO.
    I'm confused by the directory structure as I have my only project called "test". There is a long path with a test directory which has the executable and source?? IIRC. But inside that test directory there's one MORE test subdirectory. Just wondering how to move all these directories from C:\Users\me to D:\Libraries\VSCpp.

    Why would you not recommend the VS C++ compiler for C??

  4. #4
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    Visual Studio usually creates

    SolutionName\ProjectName\Debug
    SolutionName\ProjectName\Release

    If your solution and project is named test, that becomes test\test\Debug, etc.

    Visual Studio's compiler is not very good at compiling C. It is very poor, in fact.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

  5. #5
    'Allo, 'Allo, Allo
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    It doesn't do C99, but in the scheme of things it's hardly very poor.

  6. #6
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ!
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    It doesn't do C90 very well either.
    stahta01 likes this.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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