My Win32 wrapper

This is a discussion on My Win32 wrapper within the Windows Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; How do you like my new wrapper? Who said Win32 is hard? It's mostly inspired by .NET langauges where I ...

  1. #1
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    My Win32 wrapper

    How do you like my new wrapper? Who said Win32 is hard?

    It's mostly inspired by .NET langauges where I normally work in professionally. I wrote this wrapper to build native games, but I thought of adding a simple GUI interace with basic controls. I have buttons right now but can add text boxes, radio buttons, etc. What's nice is the WndProc function isn't visible. It's called by default, but if a callback function is assigned, it calls that instead. Each common event has a callback function option. I also use references instead of regular pointers (C++ feature). Even though it makes it look cleaner, it's hard to tell on the surface. If X3DForm_StartGameMode(frm, myGameLogicFunc) is called, it starts in real-time mode and you do your game logic in myGameLogicFunc() or whatever you call it. If it's not called, it's just a regular event-driven application. It's fun to build on, but also keeps everything fairly simple and something I might share soon after.

    Code:
    #include "stdafx.h"
    
    X3DFORM frm;
    X3DBUTTON btnSubmit;
    
    void myCommandFunc(int id)
    {
    	if (btnSubmit.ID == id)  { 
    		// do work
    	}
    }
    
    int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
    		   LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
    {
    	X3DForm_Init(frm, hInstance);
    	X3DForm_OnCommand(frm, myCommandFunc);
    
    	// init button
    	X3DForm_CreateButton(frm, btnSubmit, "Submit", 50, 50);
    	X3DForm_AddButton(frm, btnSubmit);
    
     	X3DForm_Show(frm);
    
    	return 0;
    }
    Last edited by dxfoo; 06-29-2010 at 05:21 PM.

  2. #2
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    You say it uses C++ references? Then why do I see a non-OO approach?
    Also, you know that there are many GUI libraries out there already (ie Qt, wxWidgets, GTK, etc)?
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

  3. #3
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    Crazy, huh? Why didn't I pick your preferred paradigm or your selected choice of assembly language? Be a little less rude next time.

  4. #4
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Not rude. A wonder. I'm sorry if you took it for a rude reply.
    I'm just saying that if you are aiming this at C++ programmers, then your code is probably going to be criticized. If you're aiming at C programmers, then you can't use references.
    Either way, it's up to you. I'm just saying.
    My own opinion is that I would never use a non-OOP C++ solution. Can't say about others, though.
    Last edited by Elysia; 06-30-2010 at 08:59 AM.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

  5. #5
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    I thougt it over. One my long-term job targets uses OOP for their games (technically Python ontop of C++), so I thought of turning it into OO to see how it would work. It took about an hour to change. The result ended up being nicer. There's less to type to make something happen. Lot less "X3DForm_DoSomething(myobject, myVar)", which turned into myObject.DoSomething(myVar). This is just a rough change at this time. I think I'll stick with the OOP approach since its less cluttering.

    Code:
    #include "stdafx.h"  
    
    X3DForm frm; 
    X3DButton btnExit;  
    
    void myCommandFunc(int id)
    {
    	if (btnExit.ID == id) 
    	{     
    		frm.Close();
    	} 
    }
     
    int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance,
    				   LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
    {        
    	frm.Init(hInstance); 
    	frm.OnCommand(myCommandFunc);
     
    	btnExit.Init("Submit", 50, 50);
    	frm.Add(btnExit);
    
    	frm.Show();
    
    	return 0;
    }

  6. #6
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    Thanks Elysia, I guess it had to sink into my brain a little and it made sense a bit after. Sorry for taking offense earlier. I was able to make events work much smoother. Rather than polling for ids in the previous example, I added events more similar to .NET.

    I have a question though... I always have to put my classes out in the global area to make this code work. Is it normal for classes to be global? I would consider a global "i" to be more dangerous than something like btnClose. I can see a large GUI and there's several global controls in this case.

    Code:
    #include "stdafx.h"     
    
    using namespace X3D;
    using namespace X3D::Win32;
    
    Form frm;
    Button btnClose;  
    
    void btnClose_Click()
    {
    	frm.Close();
    }
      
    int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
    				   LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
    {      
    	frm.Init(hInstance, "My form", 800, 600); 
    
    	btnClose.Init("Close", 50, 50);
    	btnClose.OnClick(btnClose_Click);
    	frm.Add(btnClose);
    
    	frm.Show();
    
    	return 0;
    }
    Last edited by dxfoo; 07-01-2010 at 11:08 PM.

  7. #7
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Mmm, I don't know why they need to be global in this example.
    Actually, if you ask me, I like the idea of requiring you to utilize the constructor to initialize the object. That way, you can avoid checks in your other functions to check if the object has been initialized.
    Something like
    Code:
    #include "stdafx.h"     
    
    using namespace X3D::Win32 = w32;
    
    void btnClose_Click()
    {
    	frm.Close();
    }
      
    int WINAPI WinMain(HINSTANCE hInstance, HINSTANCE hPrevInstance, 
    				   LPSTR lpCmdLine, int nCmdShow)
    {      
    	w32::Form frm(hInstance, "My form", 800, 600);
    	w32::Button btnClose("Close", 50, 50);
    
    	btnClose.OnClick(btnClose_Click);
    	frm.Add(&btnClose);
    
    	frm.Show();
    
    	return 0;
    }
    Isn't the idea that Show would block until the window closes?
    If so, then there shouldn't be any problems that I see?
    I don't see the need for globals in this case, but sometimes they may be required.

    I like what I see so far, though! You're making inroads to making a nice GUI library.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

  8. #8
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    Hmm, I tried it out and I get this error on the third line:

    error C2143: syntax error : missing ';' before '='
    Line: using namespace X3D::Win32 = w32;

    The assignment syntax is new to me. Is that for a particular compiler?
    Last edited by dxfoo; 07-02-2010 at 09:14 AM.

  9. #9
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    No, it's just me who messed up the syntax, as usual.
    It should be
    namespace w32 = X3D::Win32;
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

  10. #10
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    Okay. It has one more compile issue with 'frm' being used in btnClose_Click(). It's not visible in the global scope so I'm figuring that's why. It would be ideal if they were all in the global namespace so the application can refer to the controls whenever needed ('frm' in this example), though I don't like a long list of global variables at the end either lol. It's meant to be a simple GUI anyway with the primary focus on games. Probably not a big deal then. Thanks for the help!

  11. #11
    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Mmm, that's what you get for not compiling.
    But you could pass a reference to the event handler of the control in question.
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.
    For information on how to enable C++11 on your compiler, look here.
    よく聞くがいい!私は天才だからね! ^_^

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