Win32 Framework For C?

This is a discussion on Win32 Framework For C? within the Windows Programming forums, part of the Platform Specific Boards category; Is there any good and simple (but complete/advanced) framework for C. I'm creating windows controls on runtimes. Perhaps a framework ...

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    Question Win32 Framework For C?

    Is there any good and simple (but complete/advanced) framework for C. I'm creating windows controls on runtimes. Perhaps a framework that cover most aspects of Windows GUI programming in C is enough for me. I had googled for "Win32 Framework for C" however nothing useful returned. There are 2 reasons for me not to use C++. I don't know C++ and I don't want spend time convert my existing code to C++.

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    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    GTK+ is in C and very advanced. It's also cross-platform. What is isn't is a viable target for switching over existing Win32 code, though - it's too abstract for that.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    Quote Originally Posted by megablue View Post
    Is there any good and simple (but complete/advanced) framework for C. I'm creating windows controls on runtimes. Perhaps a framework that cover most aspects of Windows GUI programming in C is enough for me. I had googled for "Win32 Framework for C" however nothing useful returned. There are 2 reasons for me not to use C++. I don't know C++ and I don't want spend time convert my existing code to C++.
    C++ can compile C code, as well, and you'll be happier off with C++ when you know it. So my suggest is use C++ to compile your C code first. You may have some problems due to the typesafety, which is a good thing. It means you'll become a better programmer.
    Then you can slowly continue to learn C++ while creating your C code. Experiment with classes, etc.
    It's the easiest way of learning a new language, you know. Especially when it's backwards compatible!
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    Quote Originally Posted by megablue View Post
    Is there any good and simple (but complete/advanced) framework for C. I'm creating windows controls on runtimes. Perhaps a framework that cover most aspects of Windows GUI programming in C is enough for me. I had googled for "Win32 Framework for C" however nothing useful returned. There are 2 reasons for me not to use C++. I don't know C++ and I don't want spend time convert my existing code to C++.
    Frameworks aren't necessary at all. You can just code in Win32 API without a framework unless you want it to be portable.
    "The Internet treats censorship as damage and routes around it." - John Gilmore

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    C++まいる!Cをこわせ! Elysia's Avatar
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    But again, pure Win32 is really difficult and often very annoying too. I would do anything to avoid pure Win32
    Quote Originally Posted by Adak View Post
    io.h certainly IS included in some modern compilers. It is no longer part of the standard for C, but it is nevertheless, included in the very latest Pelles C versions.
    Quote Originally Posted by Salem View Post
    You mean it's included as a crutch to help ancient programmers limp along without them having to relearn too much.

    Outside of your DOS world, your header file is meaningless.

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    There is of course A REASON that most frameworks are written in C++:
    It is much easier to write them in C++, because of the structure of such a framework implies a lot of repeated "similar, but not quite the same" work - which C++ is a very good language for.

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    Please don't PM me for help - and no, I don't do help over instant messengers.

  7. #7
    Cat without Hat CornedBee's Avatar
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    True. Frameworks work a lot better in object-oriented languages.
    All the buzzt!
    CornedBee

    "There is not now, nor has there ever been, nor will there ever be, any programming language in which it is the least bit difficult to write bad code."
    - Flon's Law

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